Yesterday's Tip: What is “perimenopause”?

Perimenopause is a term used to describe the transition period that women go through from their reproductive years to menopause.

Learn more about menopause here.

April 25, 2017: What causes menopause?

Natural menopause is the result of the cessation of both ovulation and associated hormone (estrogen and progesterone) production.

Learn more about menopause here.

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April 24, 2017: I’ve just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Will it go away?

In most cases, gestational diabetes disappears after delivery, but women who have had it have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life.

Learn more about pregnancy and diabetes here.

April 23, 2017: Roughly how many calories a day will nursing my baby require?

Providing breast milk for one baby burns, on average, about 500 calories per day.

Learn more about women’s health here.

April 22, 2017: Is it OK to use insulin while I’m breast-feeding?

Yes — insulin is considered safe to take when pregnant or breast-feeding, and there have been no reported cases of adverse effects in babies. Diabetes pills, however, are not recommended for women who are breast-feeding.

Learn more about women’s health here.

April 21, 2017: Can I breast-feed my child if I have diabetes?

Yes — while having diabetes can make breast-feeding more challenging, it is not considered a medical reason not to breast-feed.

Learn more about women’s health here.

April 20, 2017: How might labor affect my blood glucose levels?

While labor leading to a vaginal delivery may lower a woman’s blood glucose level, a cesarean section can be stressful to the body and may raise the blood glucose level.

Learn more about pregnancy and diabetes here.

April 19, 2017: How much should I eat while I’m pregnant?

The calorie needs for pregnancy range from 2400 to 2800 calories per day for most physically active pregnant women.

Learn more about pregnancy and diabetes here.

April 18, 2017: How frequently should I check my blood glucose while I’m pregnant?

To keep tabs on increasing insulin requirements during pregnancy and facilitate adjustments, blood glucose self-monitoring should be done 7–10 times daily.

Learn more about pregnancy and diabetes here.

April 17, 2017: My insulin requirements have changed since I became pregnant. Why might this be?

The normal hormone production and weight gain that occur during pregnancy increase insulin resistance, causing a woman’s insulin needs to change during this time.

Learn more about pregnancy and diabetes here.