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January 1, 2020: Is there any way I can save money on my diabetes supplies?

Yes — buying your supplies in bulk can save a significant amount of money. However, make sure you don’t buy more of any item than you will use before its expiration date.

Learn more money-saving strategies here.

December 31, 2019: What is the goal of diabetes management?

The primary goal of diabetes management is optimal blood glucose control. Self-monitoring of blood glucose helps you and your diabetes care team evaluate your overall blood glucose control and review the trends and patterns of your blood glucose levels during the course of the day.

Learn more about blood glucose monitoring here.

December 30, 2019: What is the benefit of keeping my A1C at the recommended level?

The lower your HbA1c, the better your chances of avoiding serious diabetes complications.

Learn more about A1C here.

December 29, 2019: What A1C level should I aim for?

Each person with diabetes and his diabetes care team should set individualized A1C goals. For most people with diabetes, the A1C target is below 7%.

Learn more about A1C here.

December 28, 2019: I was recently diagnosed and don’t know what I should eat. What can I do?

If you haven’t already worked with a dietitian to design an individualized meal plan, ask your diabetes care team for a referral to a registered dietitian.

Learn more about nutrition and meal planning here.

December 27, 2019: I’ve been called in for a job interview. Do I need to mention my diabetes?

If your diabetes has no bearing on your ability to do the job, it would not be appropriate to bring it or any other personal medical information up during your interview.

Learn more about diabetes on the job here.

December 26, 2019: Does having an episode of high blood glucose mean I’ve failed at diabetes management?

Not at all — keep in mind that even with your best efforts in managing your diabetes, you may still experience high blood glucose from time to time.

Learn more about high blood glucose here.

December 25, 2019: Lab tests indicate that my testosterone level is low. Could this be affecting my diabetes?

Yes — low testosterone levels may contribute to increased insulin resistance, which can contribute to hyperglycemia (high blood glucose).

Learn more about testosterone and diabetes here.

December 24, 2019: Will my insulin regimen need to be adjusted while I’m pregnant?

Most likely — insulin adjustments are often necessary every 7 to 10 days during pregnancy.

Learn more about pregnancy and type 1 diabetes here.

December 23, 2019: Where should I store my oral diabetes medicines?

Store opened containers of medicines you are currently using at room temperature. Unopened packages of pills can also be stored at room temperature.

Get more tips for managing your medicines here.

December 22, 2019: Should I tell my doctor about the over-the-counter painkiller I’ve been using to treat headaches?

Yes — you should tell your health-care team about any over-the-counter medicines or alternative therapies you use so that together you can determine whether those substances or practices are having an effect on your blood glucose control.

Learn about drugs that can worsen diabetes control here.

December 21, 2019: What should I keep in mind if I’m switching from syringes to insulin pens?

You should be aware that if you switch to a different syringe or insulin pen or from one to the other, the injection technique may differ.

Learn more about insulin delivery devices here.

December 20, 2019: I’ve been experiencing high blood glucose a lot lately. Is there anything I can do?

Yes. Part of your hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) action plan will likely be more frequent blood glucose monitoring, at least temporarily, to help determine why your blood glucose is high and what you can do to avoid future episodes of hyperglycemia. Reviewing the amount of carbohydrate in your meals and snacks may also be helpful in determining the cause of hyperglycemia.

Learn more about hyperglycemia here.

December 19, 2019: I’m feeling fine. Do I still have to keep an eye on my blood glucose levels?

Yes. Part of your hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) action plan will likely be more frequent blood glucose monitoring, at least temporarily, to help determine why your blood glucose is high and what you can do to avoid future episodes of hyperglycemia. Reviewing the amount of carbohydrate in your meals and snacks may also be helpful in determining the cause of hyperglycemia.

Learn more about hyperglycemia here.

December 18, 2019: What do I need to do to keep my blood glucose levels within target range?

Keeping blood glucose levels close to normal requires learning how to balance food intake, physical activity, and the effects of any diabetes medicines your doctor may prescribe to lower your blood glucose level.

Learn more about managing blood glucose levels here.

December 17, 2019: Who gets celiac disease?

Celiac disease commonly shows up in children, but it has been diagnosed in people of all ages, mainly because not everyone with celiac disease experiences symptoms right away. (In many cases of undiagnosed celiac disease, there are no symptoms at all.) Celiac disease often occurs in those with another autoimmune disorder, and it is found in 5% to 7% of people who have type 1 diabetes.

Learn more about celiac disease here.

December 16, 2019: Are there any long-term complications of untreated celiac disease?

Yes — long-term complications of untreated celiac disease (an intolerance to gluten) include osteoporosis, fertility problems, and benign or malignant tumors of the small intestine.

Learn more about celiac disease here.

December 15, 2019: I have various dietary restrictions related to my diabetes. Can I still go on a cruise?

Yes — in fact, there’s no better place than a cruise ship if you have dietary restrictions. Just let the maître d’ know what you need. You’ll get to preview the next day’s menu, make your choice, and the chef will, if possible, alter the recipe to meet your needs.

Learn more about cruising with diabetes here.

December 14, 2019: I always get stiff on long flights. Is there anything I can do to avoid this?

Yes — do stretching exercises on the plane and walk up and down the aisle every hour to prevent muscle stiffness.

Learn more about traveling with diabetes here.

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