Soup Nutrition

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Soup Nutrition

Chosen wisely, soup is a great way to sneak in some vegetables, whole grains, and even an ounce or two of protein. Homemade soup is generally your best nutritional option, but the reality is that store-bought soups are a mainstay for many of us — they’re quick, convenient and easy to prepare. The downside of store-bought soups? Sodium, and lots of it. Excess sodium contributes to high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attack. Luckily, there’s a decent assortment of store-bought soups that are reasonable (and even low) in sodium and that are tasty, too! Choose soups with less than 480 milligrams (mg) of sodium, less than 5 mg of saturated fat, and at least 3 grams (g) of fiber per serving. If possible, look for at least 7 g of protein per serving, too. As for higher-sodium soups? Enjoy them in moderation and limit your portion (go for a cup rather than a bowl).

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Soup Nutrition

Ready to whip up some homemade soup? Check out our soup and stew recipes!

Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDCES

Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDCES

Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDCES on social media

A Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator at Good Measures, LLC, where she is a CDE manager for a virtual diabetes program. Campbell is the author of Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition & Meal Planning, a co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet, and has written for  publications including Diabetes Self-Management, Diabetes Spectrum, Clinical Diabetes, the Diabetes Research & Wellness Foundation’s newsletter, DiabeticConnect.com, and CDiabetes.com

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