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What About Insulin?

Updated

Although there are active patents on the insulin analogs—lispro (Humalog), aspart (NovoLog), glulisine (Apidra), glargine (Lantus), and detemir (Levemir)—the patents have already run out on recombinant human insulins. So, with billions of dollars at stake, why haven’t generic manufacturers rushed to make generic versions of recombinant human insulin? And why are only two U.S.-based manufacturers (Eli Lilly and Company and, more recently, Sanofi-Aventis) manufacturing insulin? Read More “What About Insulin?”

Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Updated

Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Riomet, Glumetza, and others) is a popular and highly effective oral diabetes drug used to help manage Type 2 diabetes. This drug works by lowering the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making the body’s cells more sensitive to insulin. Metformin also has some other beneficial effects in that it may help lower blood lipid, or fat, levels (cholesterol and triglycerides) and can, in some people, promote a small amount of weight loss. Read More “Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency”

Statin Studies Show Important Benefits for People With Diabetes

Updated

Two recent studies have confirmed the benefits of therapy with statins, a class of prescription drugs also known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that lowers cholesterol levels. The studies demonstrated that statins can help prevent cardiovascular “events,” such as heart attacks, both in people with diabetes who don’t have cardiovascular disease and in those who have already had a heart attack or episode of severe angina (chest pain associated with heart disease). Read More “Statin Studies Show Important Benefits for People With Diabetes”

YouTube, Diabetes, and a Story

Updated

In my free time, which I haven’t had much of lately, I like to catch up on what I’ve missed on television through the wonders of YouTube.com. If you’re not a fan of YouTube or have never visited the site but are looking for a reason to go, well, here’s one, especially if you have diabetes. This video has been out for quite some time now and is worth a screening for all of you who are Wilford Brimley fans, like myself. Read More “YouTube, Diabetes, and a Story”

What We’re Reading: “His First Syringe”

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.sixuntilme.com. In it, blogger Kerri relates the story of teaching her partner, Chris, how to give her an insulin injection. This blog is written by Kerri Morrone, a writer and editor with Type 1 diabetes.

And as a reminder, today is the final day during which you can nominate The Diabetes Self-Managment Blog for “Best Blog” and “Best Professional News Blog” over at The Diabetes O.C.. You can go straight to the nominating page, or read more about the awards in this previous “What We’re Reading” post. Read More “What We’re Reading: “His First Syringe””

You Pricked What?

Updated

I’m a little late with this post, and you’ll have to forgive me as I’ve been recovering from what I’ll now refer to as a “six-unit Thanksgiving.” I overate this Thanksgiving but took six units of insulin as an estimate for my gluttony and pretty much hit the nail on the head with a blood glucose level of 130 an hour after eating loads of cornbread, turnips, potatoes, turkey, ham, and just a few bites of banana pudding. Read More “You Pricked What?”

Antioxidant ALA Eases Pain From Diabetic Neuropathy

Updated

In a new study published in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care, the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (or ALA), taken in pill form, lessened pain in people with diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage resulting from diabetes. Previous research has shown that intravenous ALA therapy can help to reduce pain and numbness due to diabetic neuropathy, but treatment with ALA in pill form has not been widely studied. Read More “Antioxidant ALA Eases Pain From Diabetic Neuropathy”

Flying With Sharp Objects

Updated

Travel is great, but can be frustrating, especially if you arrive at your destination at 5:45 AM Tuesday, your checked baggage doesn’t catch up with you until 3:45 PM Wednesday, and nobody answers the phone at the local numbers given so you have to call overseas—twice—to get any information regarding the whereabouts of your bag. It’s bad enough when it leaves you with not much more than the clothes on your back—which aren’t warm enough for the
season—but worse when the children of the household you’re visiting have to wait one more day to find out what “Auntie Jan” brought them. Read More “Flying With Sharp Objects”

 

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