Product Review: Dodow

[1]According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a third of adults report[2] that they get less than the recommended amount of sleep. No doubt you’ve had your share of sleepless nights where you spend what seems like hours tossing and turning and staring at the clock. At the very least, the next day you feel groggy and count the hours until it’s time for bed. But if sleep eludes you on a regular basis, it can seriously affect your health, putting you at risk for Type 2 diabetes[3], heart disease, obesity and depression. If you have diabetes, a lack of adequate sleep can increase insulin resistance[4] and raise your A1C level[5], too.

A lack of sleep or a poor quality of sleep can be caused by certain medical issues, such as sleep apnea[6], peripheral neuropathy[7] and restless legs syndrome. However, if you suffer from insomnia due to stress, worries, anxiety or a mind that never seems to shut off, Dodow may be for you. Dodow is a sleep device that works by synchronizing your breathing to a light pulse that gradually slows from 11 to six beats per minute. By breathing at six respirations per minute, you quickly pass from an alert state to a resting state. You can choose an 8- or 20-minute session to help ease you into slumber. It’s perfect for those Sunday nights when you can’t fall asleep, and can even help you drift away despite a snoring partner, loud music, noisy neighbors or light streaming in through your window. Over time, you may be able to fall asleep without the help of Dodow. You might even be able to toss those sleeping pills! Start sleeping better tonight…with a little help from Dodow.

Check the price on Amazon![8]

Advertisement

Want to learn more about improving your sleep with diabetes? Read “Getting the Sleep You Need”[9] and “Eating for Better Sleep.”[10]

Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: https://www.amazon.com/Dodow-Device-300-000-Falling-Asleep/dp/B00ZFOB4BK/ref=as_li_ss_il?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1541895998&sr=1-4&keywords=Dodow&linkCode=li3&tag=madavorwebsit-20&linkId=69bc79a16ffb133fa7fab9539bdf3033&language=en_US
  2. a third of adults report: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0215-enough-sleep.html
  3. Type 2 diabetes: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/diabetes-resources/definitions/type-2-diabetes/
  4. insulin resistance: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/insulin-resistance-need-know/
  5. A1C level: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/blood-glucose-management/h-b-a-1-c/
  6. sleep apnea: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/general-health-issues/sleep-diabetes-whats-connection/sleep-apnea-diabetes/
  7. peripheral neuropathy: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/complications-prevention/diabetic-peripheral-neuropathy/
  8. Check the price on Amazon!: https://amzn.to/2FwYEL7
  9. “Getting the Sleep You Need”: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/general-health-issues/getting-the-sleep-you-need/
  10. “Eating for Better Sleep.”: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/eating-better-sleep/

Source URL: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/product-review-dodow/


Amy Campbell: Amy Campbell is the author of Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning and a frequent contributor to Diabetes Self-Management and Diabetes & You. She has co-authored several books, including the The Joslin Guide to Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association’s 16 Myths of a “Diabetic Diet,” for which she received a Will Solimene Award of Excellence in Medical Communication and a National Health Information Award in 2000. Amy also developed menus for Fit Not Fat at Forty Plus and co-authored Eat Carbs, Lose Weight with fitness expert Denise Austin. Amy earned a bachelor’s degree in nutrition from Simmons College and a master’s degree in nutrition education from Boston University. In addition to being a Registered Dietitian, she is a Certified Diabetes Educator and a member of the American Dietetic Association, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Amy was formerly a Diabetes and Nutrition Educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, where she was responsible for the development, implementation, and evaluation of disease management programs, including clinical guideline and educational material development, and the development, testing, and implementation of disease management applications. She is currently the Director of Clinical Education Content Development and Training at Good Measures. Amy has developed and conducted training sessions for various disease and case management programs and is a frequent presenter at disease management events.

Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor.