Product Review: Dex4 Glucose Gel


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If you take insulin[1] or types of diabetes pills called sulfonylureas[2] or meglitinides[3], you’re at risk for hypoglycemia[4] (low blood glucose), which is generally considered to be a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Missing or delaying a meal, unplanned physical activity, drinking alcohol without eating, or taking more medicine than prescribed all raise the risk of having a “low.” Symptoms of hypoglycemia include feeling shaky or dizzy, sweating, feeling hungry, having a headache, or not being able to concentrate.

The best way to handle hypoglycemia is to prevent it from happening in the first place. But because life happens, it’s important to be prepared. Dex4 Glucose Gel is a fast-acting source of carbohydrate that’s an excellent option for treating low blood glucose. Using a glucose gel is a convenient and fast way to treat lows, since it doesn’t require chewing and is easy to swallow. Each 1.2-ounce pouch of Dex4 Glucose Gel contains 15 grams of carbohydrate — the amount recommended for treating hypoglycemia. The pouches are convenient to carry in your purse, briefcase, or backpack. Keep a few in your car’s glove compartment and desk drawer, as well. They’re also perfect for traveling or anytime you’re on the go!

 

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Endnotes:
  1. insulin: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/what-does-insulin-do/
  2. sulfonylureas: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/diabetes-medicine-sulfonylureas/
  3. meglitinides: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/diabetes-medicine-meglitinides/
  4. hypoglycemia: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/blood-glucose-management/understanding-hypoglycemia/
  5. Check the price on Amazon!: https://amzn.to/2sPngGj

Source URL: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/product-review-dex4-glucose-gel/


Amy Campbell: Amy Campbell is the author of Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning and a frequent contributor to Diabetes Self-Management and Diabetes & You. She has co-authored several books, including the The Joslin Guide to Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association’s 16 Myths of a “Diabetic Diet,” for which she received a Will Solimene Award of Excellence in Medical Communication and a National Health Information Award in 2000. Amy also developed menus for Fit Not Fat at Forty Plus and co-authored Eat Carbs, Lose Weight with fitness expert Denise Austin. Amy earned a bachelor’s degree in nutrition from Simmons College and a master’s degree in nutrition education from Boston University. In addition to being a Registered Dietitian, she is a Certified Diabetes Educator and a member of the American Dietetic Association, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Amy was formerly a Diabetes and Nutrition Educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, where she was responsible for the development, implementation, and evaluation of disease management programs, including clinical guideline and educational material development, and the development, testing, and implementation of disease management applications. She is currently the Director of Clinical Education Content Development and Training at Good Measures. Amy has developed and conducted training sessions for various disease and case management programs and is a frequent presenter at disease management events.

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