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Travel Tips

Updated

Diabetes should never keep you from doing the things you love, and travel – even world travel – is no exception. Luckily, there are several resources that can give you pointers to prepare for your travels…

Keeping Feet Healthy

Updated

As you may know, people with diabetes have good reason to take good care of their feet. Having diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels that serve the feet and legs, which can lead to loss of sensation and reduced blood circulation, raising the risk of foot ulcers and even the need for amputation…

Novel Diabetes Drug Cycloset Approved

Updated

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug for treating Type 2 diabetes. Called Cycloset, the drug is actually a new version of the older drug bromocriptine, which has been used at higher doses to treat people with Parkinson disease.

Some Accu-Chek Spirit Pumps Recalled

Updated

On April 30, Disetronic Medical Systems, Inc. (a division of Roche) announced a recall of certain Accu-Chek Spirit insulin pumps due to a manufacturing problem: These pumps may be at risk of having their "up" and/or "down" buttons fail with repeated use. Pumps with serial numbers ranging from SN02119552 to SN10006093, which were shipped in the United States, are affected by this recall.

Protecting Yourself from Swine Flu

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If you’ve been reading, watching, or listening to the news over the last week, you’ve probably heard about the cases of H1N1 influenza (or "swine flu") that have broken out in Mexico and in a few locations in the United States and other parts of the world. On April 29, the World Health Organization (WHO) raised the worldwide pandemic alert level to Phase 5, sending a "strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short." In other words, more cases may be on the way.

Stronger Warning For Gastroparesis Drug

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The drug metoclopramide (brand names Reglan, Maxolon, and Octamide), which can be used to treat gastroparesis (slowed stomach emptying caused by nerve damage), now must carry a boxed warning to alert doctors and users of a risk it may pose. People who take the drug for longer than recommended have a higher chance of developing tardive dyskinesia, a neurological disorder whose symptoms may remain even after the drug is stopped.

Fibrate Drug May Lower Heart Risks in Some

Updated

New data from the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study has shown that taking the drug fenofibrate (brand names TriCor, Lofibra, and others) may help people with Type 2 diabetes and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes Alert Day Brings Free Tools and Tips

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This past Tuesday, March 24, was American Diabetes Alert Day. This one-day "wake-up call" for the American public has taken place on the fourth Tuesday in March for the last 21 years. Sponsored by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the day aims to raise awareness of the seriousness of diabetes and urge people to find out if they or their loved ones are at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Stem Cell Research Restriction Lifted

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On Monday, March 9, President Barack Obama signed an order lifting the ban on federal funding for certain types of embryonic stem cell research — a move that is being commended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Getting Screened for Glaucoma

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Next Thursday, March 12, is the second annual World Glaucoma Day. Because people with diabetes have a higher risk of developing glaucoma (about twice the risk of those without diabetes), this may be a good time to brush up your knowledge of steps you can take to prevent and treat this sight-robbing condition. Getting screened for glaucoma is crucial, because it has no early warning signs.

HbA1c Test to be Used for Diagnosis

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When you were diagnosed with diabetes (or prediabetes), did your doctor do a fingerstick blood test in his office, or give you a fasting plasma glucose test? Or did he make the diagnosis based on your HbA1c level? Although some doctors are already using HbA1c test results as a diagnostic tool, you may be surprised to know that there are currently no official guidelines for doing so. However, that may be about to change.

Salsalate Study Now Recruiting

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Last week, in his blog entry "Stress, Inflammation, Diabetes," David Spero wrote about the anti-inflammatory drug salsalate — an older, cheaper medicine that has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in preliminary studies. Several readers commented that they were interested in learning more about salsalate and possibly trying it. Now, thanks to a new clinical trial that is recruiting participants, they may have a chance.

Higher HbA1c = Lower Brain Function?

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Following on the heels of last week’s blog entry ("Diabetes, Exercise, Outlook, and Your Brain"), which summarized some recent research about things that may affect brain function, comes another study looking at the effects of high blood glucose on the brain. Published online this week in the journal Diabetes Care, the new study has found a link between higher HbA1c levels and lower cognitive functioning in people with Type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes, Exercise, Outlook, and Your Brain

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A few new studies about cognitive function — the ability to think, reason, and remember — have made the news this month. One has linked Type 2 diabetes with an early decline in certain types of cognitive function; another has shown that a positive attitude may help ward off dementia; and a third has shown that exercise may help boost cognitive functioning in older people.

Does Aspirin Do Much Good?

Updated

Should people who have diabetes — but no signs of cardiovascular disease — take aspirin to help reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke? Studies have shown that aspirin helps prevent additional heart attacks and strokes in people who have already had one. And since having diabetes puts people at an increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke, the American Heart Association recommends aspirin therapy. However, two studies published late last year have called this practice into question.

FDA: Stifler or Savior?

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The FDA’s recent decision to tighten its standards for new diabetes drugs has drawn protests from some of the diabetes online community. Decide what you think of this regulatory reconsideration.

Diets Do Work?

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Does eating fewer calories help people keep extra weight off? Or does it just make people feel deprived, leading to a "boomerang" effect of more binge eating and weight gain down the road? A new study published in the American Journal of Health Promotion has examined these questions and found that cutting calories may actually be a good way for middle-aged women to keep the extra pounds at bay.

2008: The Year in Diabetes

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As the year draws to a close, we thought that we’d take a look back at the news stories, blog entries, recipes, and articles that were the most popular on DiabetesSelfManagement.com in 2008. Leave us a comment and let us know which ones were your favorites and why!

Cancer Drugs Reverse Type 1 Diabetes in Mice

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According to a new animal study, a class of cancer-fighting drugs may have some Type-1-diabetes–fighting potential. The study found that treating mice that had recently developed Type 1 diabetes with the drugs imatinib (brand name Gleevec) and sunitinib (Sutent) sent the condition into remission in 80% of them.

World Diabetes Day 2008

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Today, November 14, is World Diabetes Day. Events have been planned on every continent to raise awareness of the global diabetes epidemic and the need to increase prevention efforts, improve treatment, and find a cure. The theme of this year’s World Diabetes Day is "Diabetes in Children and Adolescents."

Calories, Carb Counts Coming to Philadelphia Menus

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Another city will now require chain restaurants to post nutrition information about the food items they sell on menus and menu boards. This time, it’s Philadelphia, and the new requirements there will go beyond those in place in New York City and California; not only will calorie counts have to be posted on menu boards, but saturated and trans fat, sodium, and carbohydrates will have to be be disclosed along with calorie counts on printed menus.

Insulin Syringe Recall

Updated

The company Tyco Healthcare Group (Covidien) is recalling one lot of ReliOn insulin syringes, so if you use this brand, you should check your package(s) to see if yours are affected.

The Rising Costs of Treating Type 2

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A study published this week in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine has put the spotlight on the rising cost of Type 2 diabetes drugs. According to researchers from the University of Chicago, the University of California, San Francisco, and Stanford University, spending on diabetes drugs increased by 87% between 1994 and 2007, from $6.7 billion to $12.5 billion.

Updated Guidelines for Treating Type 2

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This week, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) updated their recommendations for how Type 2 diabetes should be treated. The new guidelines have been published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia and will be published in print in the January 2009 issue of Diabetes Care.

Fighting Fatty Liver With Exercise

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As Eric Lagergren has highlighted in his last few blog entries ("A Week in the Life," "The Paranoid Moments," and "When the Paranoia Subsides"), having diabetes can raise your risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat accumulates in the liver, possibly leading to liver damage and other complications. Now a new study has shown that, in addition to all of its other benefits, exercising regularly can help people with diabetes significantly reduce the amount of fat in and around their livers.

Free Depression Screening, In Person and Online

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Today, October 10, is National Depression Screening Day. This means that screening for depression and other mental health disorders is available in person at thousands of sites across the United States, as well as online.

California Chain Restaurants Will List Calories

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A new law passed in California this week will require chain restaurants throughout the state to list calorie counts on menus and menu boards. While a similar measure went into effect in New York City this summer, this law will make California the first state in the nation to have such a requirement.

Disability Law Amendment May Benefit People with Diabetes

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In a move that the American Diabetes Association is calling "a historic victory," President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act into law on September 25. This amendment to the original 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act is meant to restore its broad protection of people from unfair treatment because of their disabilities—which can include diabetes.

Study Shows Real Benefit from CGMS

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A new study, funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and published online this month in The New England Journal of Medicine, has found that using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system can lower blood glucose levels significantly in six months in adults with Type 1 diabetes.

Early Blood Glucose Control Protects Years Later

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Tightly controlling your blood glucose levels soon after being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes can lead to lower risks of diabetes complications—including heart disease and death—years later, according to new follow-up results from a major clinical trial. This new study was published online this week in The New England Journal of Medicine, and looked at participants in the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) 10 years after that study had ended.

Is Online Diabetes Education For You?

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Whether you are newly diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for years, meeting with a diabetes educator individually or as part of a group is one of the best things you can do to understand how to manage your diabetes (or brush up). Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t get much diabetes education, whether because of lack of insurance coverage, lack of access to a diabetes educator or to group classes, lack of time, or another obstacle.

Byetta and Pancreatitis: What You Should Know

Updated

The injected Type 2 diabetes drug exenatide (brand name Byetta) has been in the news this week because of safety concerns. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on August 18 that six cases of severe pancreatitis have been reported in people taking Byetta since October 2007.

Drug Combo Linked to Increased Health Risks

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According to an evaluation of multiple studies, taking a combination of two common types of Type 2 diabetes drugs may be linked to an increased risk of dying or ending up in the hospital due to cardiovascular disease.

Kidney Disease: Learn the Symptoms

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This coming week (August 11–15) is Kidney Disease Awareness and Education Week, which is sponsored each year by the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association (ANNA). The purpose of the week is to raise awareness about kidney disease, treatment options, and related legislative issues among policymakers as well as the general public. How much do you know about your risk for kidney disease?

Knocking Out Prediabetes

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If you are one of the more than 56 million Americans who have prediabetes, more guidance on how reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes may be on the way. This week, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) agreed to recommend an aggressive approach to treating prediabetes, releasing the first official treatment recommendations that have been made for this condition.

New Combination Drug Approved

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On June 23, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new pill that combines two older drugs for Type 2 diabetes. Called PrandiMet, the pill is a combination of repaglinide (brand name Prandin) and metformin (Glucophage and other brand names).

Diabetes Linked to Hearing Loss

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If you have diabetes and have trouble hearing, you’re not alone. A new study has found a higher rate of hearing loss in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. While other small studies have found links between the two conditions in the past, this new study has found that hearing loss is quite common in people with diabetes.

Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 3): VADT

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The VA Diabetes Trial, or VADT, was the third large study of tight blood glucose control and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Type 2 diabetes that was presented at the June 2008 ADA Scientific Sessions. You can read about the results of the other two major studies in this vein, ADVANCE and ACCORD, in "Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 1): ADVANCE" and "Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 2): ACCORD."

Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 2): ACCORD

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This is my second report on the large studies of tight blood glucose control and cardiovascular disease risk in Type 2 diabetes that were presented at the ADA Scientific Sessions earlier this month. You can read about the results of the ADVANCE trial in "Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 1): ADVANCE." This week, I’ll discuss the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes, or ACCORD, trial.

What’s Your eAG? You’ll Know Soon…

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If you’ve ever wondered how your HbA1c level relates to the numbers you get on your blood glucose meter, help may be on the way. A recent study has found a more accurate way to "translate" HbA1c results into average blood glucose levels. In the near future, therefore, doctors and labs may be reporting HbA1c test results both as a percentage (the old way) and as an "estimated average glucose" (or eAG) number.

Tight Control and Cardiovascular Disease (Part 1): ADVANCE

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Three large studies presented at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) Scientific Sessions meeting in the last week have shed some light on the question of whether tight control of blood glucose levels helps prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people with Type 2 diabetes. None of the trials found that tight control was associated with a lower risk of CVD, and one found an increased risk of death among the participants practicing more intensive control.

Quitting Smoking as a Group

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A new study of social networks and smoking has found that when a person quits smoking, his decision may have a big effect on the smoking behaviors of his family members and friends.

Two Diabetes Contests Encourage Creativity

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Two contests that combine artistry, diabetes, and celebrity judges are aiming to increase diabetes awareness and inspire people to get creative. The Dancin’ To Change Diabetes Contest is calling for video entries through June 1, while the Inspired by Diabetes Creative Expression Competition has just chosen its winners. Both contests will pay tribute to their winners in San Francisco during the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 68th Annual Scientific Sessions in June.

Low-GI Diet May Help Kids With Type 1

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A small study published in the April 2008 issue of Diabetes Care has shown that a diet low on the glycemic index may lead to better blood glucose control in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.

“National Diabetes Goal” Set

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On Wednesday, a group of diabetes advocacy and business organizations, under the umbrella of Novo Nordisk’s National Changing Diabetes Program (NCDP), announced an ambitious goal: By 2015, they want 45% of Americans who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes to know their blood glucose level and what actions they can take to lower their risk of developing diabetes.

Kidney Fund Contest Opens to Young Artists

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The American Kidney Fund is looking for artwork made by kids and teens who have kidney disease to include in its 2009 calendar. In addition to having their art published, 13 winners of this national contest will receive an all-expenses-paid weekend trip to Washington, DC, for themselves and a parent or guardian.

Actos May Help Slow Heart Disease

Updated

According to a new study, the Type 2 diabetes drug pioglitazone (brand name Actos) appears to slow the progression of coronary atherosclerosis, or narrowing of the heart’s arteries due to plaque buildup, better than an older diabetes drug, glimepiride (Amaryl, also available generically). People who have diabetes are at increased risk of developing heart disease, and coronary atherosclerosis can lead to angina or heart attack.

Keeping the Weight Off

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A new study has highlighted some methods that can help people who have lost weight keep the pounds off over the long term. In the longest and largest study of this nature yet published, researchers found that person-to-person interaction with a weight-loss professional worked best, and that using an interactive Web site also helped people keep weight off over a period of two years.

FreeStyle Navigator CGMS Approved

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A new continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), the Freestyle Navigator manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for people with diabetes who are 18 and older.

ADVANCE Study Contradicts ACCORD Findings

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The surprising and much-publicized early findings from the ACCORD study, which showed a slightly increased risk of death among certain people with Type 2 diabetes who used intensive drug therapy to lower blood glucose levels, have prompted researchers conducting a similar ongoing study to release early results. The ADVANCE study, which is the largest study ever of aggressive blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes, has found no increase in risk of death associated with intensive treatment.

Blood Pressure Rising… What Can You Do?

Updated

According to a report published in the February 12 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, rates of uncontrolled high blood pressure are on the rise in American women. Women now have higher rates of uncontrolled high blood pressure than men do in every state, and rates in men are still higher than they should be.

Gastric Banding May Help Reverse Type 2

Updated

A study published in January in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that gastric banding weight-loss surgery in obese people with Type 2 diabetes led to better blood glucose control and higher rates of diabetes reversal than lifestyle changes meant to help people lose weight. The surgery also helped people lose significantly more weight than lifestyle changes. This was the first randomized study comparing weight-loss surgery to conventional therapy for managing Type 2 diabetes in obese people.

The ACCORD Trial Findings: What You Should Know

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In one large, ongoing trial of people with Type 2 diabetes and a high risk of cardiovascular disease, intensive blood glucose control has been linked with a slightly higher risk of death compared with less-intensive, "standard" treatment. Participants in the trial who were receiving intensive treatment will now be switched over to standard treatment. While these findings were unexpected and have raised some concerns about diabetes treatment strategies for specific groups of people, they should not trigger a change in therapy for most people with diabetes.

Caffeine May Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Updated

A small study conducted at Duke University has suggested that caffeine may hurt blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes. The study’s authors have suggested that people with diabetes may want to avoid caffeinated beverages based on these findings; however, not all medical experts agree that total avoidance is necessary.

Vytorin Study Results Disappoint

Updated

The newly released results of a preliminary study suggest that the drug Vytorin, which combines the cholesterol-lowering drug ezetimibe with a statin, may slow the growth of arterial plaque no more effectively than a statin taken alone.

Symlin Now Available in a Pen

Updated

The injected diabetes drug pramlintide (brand name Symlin) is now available in pen form. Drug manufacturer Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced this week that two new prefilled, pen-injector devices—the SymlinPen 120 and the SymlinPen 60—are now on the market to make the process of injecting mealtime doses of pramlintide simpler and more convenient. Until this week, pramlintide was only available in vials.

ADA’s New Guidelines OK Low-Carb Diets for Weight Loss

Updated

On Friday, December 28, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) issued its 2008 Clinical Practice Recommendations, which are a set of guidelines that help health-care providers treat people with diabetes based on the most current scientific evidence. One key change in this year’s recommendations is the inclusion of low-carbohydrate diets as an option for people with diabetes who are trying to lose weight.

Bayer Recalls Faulty Test Strips

Updated

Bayer Diabetes Care has issued a voluntary recall on certain lots of test strips designed for use with its Contour TS blood glucose meter. Blood glucose monitoring performed with the faulty test strips may produce readings that are 5% to 17% higher than actual blood glucose levels.

Study Finds New Risks for Avandia

Updated

A new study of an older, "real-world" population, published in the December 12 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has confirmed the findings of earlier research by linking Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) with increased heart risks. It has also uncovered a new risk associated with the drug—namely, an increased risk of dying that had not been observed before. Studies of rosiglitazone have made the news a lot lately (see our own recent coverage in "Avandia: New Warning and Findings").

If the Shoe Fits…

Updated

Are you sure that the shoes you wear are the right size for your feet? A recent study suggests that a large proportion of people with diabetes may be wearing the wrong size shoes, potentially exposing themselves to foot injuries that could lead to complications such as foot ulcers and amputation.

Avandia: New Warning and Findings

Updated

The Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand names Avandia, Avandamet, and Avandaryl) has continued to make headlines over the last month as a new warning, new prescribing recommendations, and new findings about one of its side effects have been published. As you may recall, an analysis of multiple clinical trials published earlier this year in The New England Journal of Medicine linked rosiglitazone to an increased risk of heart attack and triggered a storm of controversy about the drug’s safety (read more at "Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks").

National Diabetes Month, Weeks 4 & 5: At-Risk Populations and Youth

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As November draws to a close, so does National Diabetes Month, which has been devoted to increasing public awareness about the management and prevention of diabetes. Each week so far has focused on a different "face" of diabetes (see previous blog entries "National Diabetes Month, Week 1: Caregivers," "National Diabetes Month, Week 2: Employees," and "National Diabetes Month, Week 3: Around the World"). The final two weeks of the month are focused on at-risk populations (Week 4) and youth (Week 5).

National Diabetes Month, Week 3: Around the World

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Last week, I had the pleasure of meeting singer (and season 5 American Idol finalist) Elliott Yamin. Yamin, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 16, is currently lending his voice to Inspired by Diabetes, a project cosponsored by the International Diabetes Federation’s (IDF) Unite for Diabetes initiative and pharmaceutical corporation Eli Lilly and Company. At the center of this project is the Creative Expression Competition, a worldwide contest "which seeks expressions of the challenges and triumphs of the diabetes journey through art, essay, poetry, photography and music."

National Diabetes Month, Week 1: Caregivers

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November is National Diabetes Month, which also incorporates World Diabetes Day on November 14. It’s a month dedicated to raising awareness about diabetes and advocating for its prevention, cure, and management. Events are scheduled around the country and the world—keep any eye out for happenings in your area, or enter your ZIP code into the "Local Events & Information" box on the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) home page.

Get Your Flu and Pneumonia Shots

Updated

Flu season is getting under way, and if you have not done so already this year, it’s time to get your flu shot. People with diabetes age 2 and older will also benefit from being vaccinated against pneumonia.

Exubera Inhaled Insulin Discontinued

Updated

On Thursday, October 18, pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced that it will stop selling its inhaled insulin product, Exubera. Pfizer said that it will help doctors switch people who currently use Exubera to alternative treatments over the next three months.

Treating Depression Through the Workplace

Updated

As bloggers Jan Chait and David Spero discussed in their blog entries ("Diabetes-Savvy Mental Health Professionals Needed" and "Depression and Type 2 Diabetes—Symptoms or Disease?") this week, people who have diabetes are also more prone to depression. Depression is highly treatable, but a large percentage of people with depression are not diagnosed or treated, and depression is a leading contributor to disability worldwide. A study published last month, however, shows that the workplace may be an effective—and cost-effective—place to diagnose and treat depression.

Cinnamon—Not So Useful?

Updated

Can cinnamon help improve blood glucose control in people with diabetes? Some preliminary studies (including the one discussed last year in Amy Campbell’s blog entry "Can Cinnamon Help You Control Your Diabetes?") seemed to imply that it could. But now, newer research is showing less promise for the spice’s use in people with either Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes.

Warning About Possible Meter Malfunction

Updated

Certain blood glucose meters manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care may not work properly if they have been dropped onto a hard surface, such as the floor. A warning to this effect was released by Abbott and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier this month.

Actos Tops Avandia in Heart Safety Studies

Updated

Two more meta-analyses, or studies that review the results of multiple past clinical trials, have found that taking the diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) appears to increase heart attack risk while its rival drug, pioglitazone (Actos) does not. The studies confirmed, however, that both drugs increase the risk of heart failure.

What We’re Reading: Type 1 Diabetes Conference Survey

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to a survey that is gathering information about the feasibility of planning a conference for adults with Type 1 diabetes. You can find out more about the conference idea and leave comments with your thoughts at diabetes blogger Allison Blass’s post on the subject here. People who take the survey and propose a name for the conference will also have a chance to win a book or a mug.

The survey closes on September 7, so click on the link above to put in your two cents about a conference for adults with Type 1 diabetes.

Article of the Week: To Pump, or Not to Pump?

Updated

Choosing the right time to try insulin pump therapy can be a complicated decision. This article focuses on the needs of children and adolescents, but the information it provides is applicable to anyone considering switching to insulin pump therapy. It covers basics of pumping, advantages and challenges of pump therapy, factors that may affect the decision, and switching back to injections if pumping doesn’t work out.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

New Research Focuses on Blood Pressure Control (Part 1)

Updated

As an article published in The New York Times earlier this week (and blogged about on DiabetesSelfManagement.com by Jan Chait and Eric Lagergren) stated, controlling cholesterol and blood pressure levels are crucial for staving off heart disease in people with diabetes. And indeed, high blood pressure, or hypertension, is a hot topic right now, as multiple new studies have addressed the rate at which it is diagnosed, the damage it can do, and ways of lowering it.

Is Obesity “Catching”? And Should It Be Diagnosed?

Updated

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine recently made headlines when it found that obesity can spread through social networks; in other words, that having friends who are obese raises a person’s risk of becoming obese himself.

Recipe of the Week: Dill dip

Updated

This low-carbohydrate dip is great with raw vegetables at a party or as a snack. Dill weed is abundant in late summer and should be found with the other fresh herbs at your grocery store or farmer’s market.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: School Planning 101

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Believe it or not, kids will be heading back to school pretty soon! If your child has diabetes, he should have a written diabetes management plan for school. This article can help you understand types of plans, questions that should be answered by a plan, and concerns that a school plan should address.

Two Standard Blood Tests May Get an Overhaul

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Findings from three recent studies may soon cause the way two important blood tests are administered or interpreted to change. Researchers studying the relationship between after-meal triglyceride levels and heart risk and the accuracy of the HbA1c test have concluded that there may be better ways to measure or present results from these tests.

Recipe of the Week: Cool tomato, cucumber, and onion toss

Updated

This refreshing, lettuce-free salad is a great way to start off a meal—thanks to its water and fiber content, it helps fill you up on few calories. It’s also an ideal dish for a hot summer day when you don’t feel like using the stove.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Disease, Treatment, and Oral Health

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This article addresses oral health problems that can be related to medical conditions (including diabetes) or drugs a person might take to treat certain conditions. Dental hygienist Shirley Gutkowski explains how to manage dry mouth, yeast infections, gum disorders, and other problems, and also discusses how depression can affect oral health.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Panel Recommends That Avandia Stay on the Market

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An advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has voted that the Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia; also found in Avandamet and Avandaryl) should remain on the market. The panel does, however, recommend that the drug carry new safety warnings to reflect its risk to the heart.

Recipe of the Week: Fantastic fruit medley

Updated

As Amy Campbell explains in her blog entry this week, fruit tends to have a low “energy density” thanks to its high fiber and water content. This fruit salad, low in calories but a good source of fiber (not to mention vitamins and minerals), certainly fits the bill.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Spiritual Self-Care and the Use of Prayer

Updated

Can spirituality help you manage your diabetes? Research in the area of mind/body medicine says that it may. Check out this article from the archives to learn more about how prayer and other holistic practices can contribute to a person’s health and well-being.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

More Good News About Exercise

Updated

Two recent studies have shown that exercise can play a crucial role in both managing diabetes and fighting hard-to-treat depression.

Recipe of the Week: Chocolate mocha pudding

Updated

Amy Campbell’s blog entry this week highlights the health benefits of eating dark chocolate. This recipe, conveniently prepared using the microwave, combines chocolate with the taste of coffee for an antioxidant-rich treat.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Sexual Wellness

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In his blog entry this week, David Spero discusses some of the sexual problems that can arise in people with diabetes and some ideas for overcoming them. This article from the archives expands upon that subject by examining different sexual disorders, giving guidance on how to tell if they are related to diabetes, and offering tips on getting help and maintaining your relationship.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

More Trouble for Avandia; Alternative Drugs Reviewed

Updated

It hasn’t been a very good year for Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia). First, in December and January, studies came out linking the drug to an increased risk of bone fractures in women (see "Diabetes Drug Linked to Fracture Risk”). Then, in May, the drug made headlines when an analysis of multiple studies found a link between rosiglitazone and increased risk of heart attack (see "Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”). Now two more studies have been published, one of which links the drug to a slew of adverse effects and the other of which ties it to an increased risk of cancer in women.

Recipe of the Week: Indian summer stew

Updated

Who says stew is only for winter? This dish mingles herbs and spices with fresh summer vegetables like green beans, eggplant, bell peppers, and yellow squash for a hearty dish that’s high in fiber but low in calories.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Getting to Know Ketones

Updated

“Does anyone really know what a ketone is?” this article asks. “Are they a danger to your health (as in diabetic ketoacidosis), or a sign that you have lowered your carbohydrate intake enough to cause weight loss (as some people who follow low-carbohydrate diets believe)?” Read on to learn about how ketones can be related to diet or exercise, how to test for ketones, and how to deal with diabetic ketoacidosis.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Diabetes Mentoring Program Proposed

Updated

Have you ever wished you had a “diabetes mentor”—someone who had experience living with diabetes and could help guide you through the learning process? Or perhaps you wish that you could put your accumulated expertise with diabetes to work helping someone who is recently diagnosed or has questions. If so, you may be interested in a soon-to-be-launched diabetes mentoring program called “Peers for Progress.”

Recipe of the Week: Mango ice

Updated

Let the freezer do most of the work when preparing this icy treat, which is made with real mango. It’s a great low-calorie, fat-free way to cool down on a hot day, and it gets a serving of fruit into you, too!

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Managing Hyperglycemia

Updated

In her blog entry this week, Jan Chait writes about how she learned to use the information she got from checking her blood glucose to manage her diabetes. This article from the archives delves further into the subject, explaining blood glucose goals, causes of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose), and what steps you can take to bring down high blood glucose levels.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Lipid-lowering Drugs Help Avert Neuropathy, Stroke

Updated

Two new studies presented recently at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions found previously unknown benefits for cholesterol– and triglyceride-lowering drugs in people with Type 2 diabetes. One study found that medicines from two different classes of lipid-lowering drugs reduced people’s risk of developing peripheral neuropathy; the other found that a drug in the statin class reduced the risk of certain cardiovascular events in people who recently had a stroke.

FDA Issues New Supplement Rules

Updated

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced new standards for the manufacturing of dietary supplements (such as vitamins, minerals, and herbs) to ensure that they are free of contamination and impurities, produced in a quality-controlled environment, and contain exactly what their labels say they contain. These new rules do not, however, go as far as to require that supplements be safe and effective—that is, that they actually have any particular effect in the body.

What We’re Reading: 10 Best Diabetes Web sites

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to HealthCentral.com‘s First Annual Top Site Awards, which recognize the 10 best Web sites dedicated to educating and supporting people with diabetes. We are proud to announce that, along with several other excellent sites (many of which have been featured in previous "What We’re Reading" posts), a panel of experts named DiabetesSelfManagement.com to this exclusive list.

You can read more about the awards and view the list of winners here.

Recipe of the Week: Black bean salad

Updated

This hearty salad combines fiber-rich beans with fresh summer produce, including corn, tomatoes, and bell peppers. The combination makes for a cool, satisfying side dish or meal.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Meditation and the Art of Diabetes Self-Management

Updated

When you’re feeling stressed, taking a few minutes to meditate can really help you calm down and get focused. Regular meditation may even help improve your diabetes control. This article by former blogger Joe Nelson explains how meditation works and features some simple techniques that can get you started.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

New Risk of Smoking Found for Type 1

Updated

You may already know that smoking increases the risk for Type 2 diabetes, and that it can increase a person’s risk of diabetes complications such as circulation problems, nerve damage, and kidney disease. A recent study, however, looked at people with Type 1 diabetes and found a link between smoking and severe hypoglycemia (dangerously low blood glucose levels).

Recipe of the Week: Spicy grilled tilapia

Updated

For many people, the official start of summer means the official start of grilling season. As a healthier and more exotic alternative to hamburgers and hot dogs, why not grill up a few spice-rubbed tilapia fillets? This simple recipe is low in fat, carbohydrate, and sodium, and is a good source of protein.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Be Aware of Hypoglycemia Unawareness

Updated

In his blog entry this week, Andy Stuckey writes about feeling the symptoms of low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia. This article from the archives reviews symptoms and discusses how to prevent and treat hypoglycemia as well as how to deal with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of the usual signs of hypoglycemia.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Seven-Day Continuous Glucose Monitor Approved

Updated

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a continuous glucose monitoring system that measures a person’s glucose levels for seven consecutive days with a single sensor. The other continuous glucose monitoring devices currently on the market are approved for no more than three consecutive days of use with a single sensor.

Recipe of the Week: Asparagus salad with yogurt dressing

Updated

One way to get more vegetables into your diet (a topic Amy Campbell writes about this week in her blog entry) is to make them the star of the show. Asparagus is in season now; why not pick some up at your local market and toss with yogurt, herbs, and cherry tomatoes to make this salad? One serving of the low-calorie, low-carbohydrate dish supplies two servings of vegetables.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Choosing Dental Care

Updated

If, like many people, you find yourself constantly putting off a visit to the dentist, check out this guide. It tells you how to look for a dentist and dental hygienist, what to expect at a dental checkup, how to deal with “dental anxiety,” and what mouth and dental problems are more common in people with diabetes.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

New Data on Avandia; New Warnings for TZD Drugs

Updated

In a follow-up to the study they published online on May 25 that warned about possible elevated heart attack risk associated with the diabetes drug rosiglitazone, (brand name Avandia), The New England Journal of Medicine has published another study this week that found no significant increase in risk of heart disease associated with the drug. (For more details about the first study, see "Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks.")

Recipe of the Week: Banana-berry smoothie

Updated

Prefreezing fruit, such as sliced banana and blueberries, makes it easy to throw together a cool smoothie anytime. This smoothie supplies fiber and protein for a filling and refreshing breakfast or snack.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Foot Care: Drugstore Do’s and Dont’s

Updated

People who have diabetes have a higher risk of developing problems with their feet due to poor blood circulation and nerve damage. Do you know how to care for your feet at home and which over-the-counter products are the best choices for keeping your feet healthy? This article from the archives, written by a podiatrist, can help you find out.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Avandia Update

Updated

Following upon the recent conclusion from an analysis of multiple studies that diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) may increase heart attack risk (see “Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched its own analysis of data abut the drug. Last week, a statement from a member of Congress indicated that the preliminary results of the FDA’s evaluation show a similar magnitude of heart attack risk.

What We’re Reading: Charges Against Doug Burns Dropped

Updated

Following up on an earlier "What We’re Reading" feature ("Hypoglycemia Mix-Up Leads to Arrest"), we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.diabetesmine.com. The post announces that the case against current "Mr. Universe" Doug Burns has been dismissed. Mr. Burns, who has Type 1 diabetes, was involved in an altercation with police in April and was arrested after being mistaken for intoxicated when he was actually experiencing hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose.

The blog entry is written by Amy Tenderich, a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

Chromium Supplements Show Little Benefit in New Study

Updated

As dietitian Amy Campbell stated in her blog entry “Chromium Confusion,” the research on whether supplements of the mineral chromium can help people control their diabetes is “ever-changing.” Now the latest research on the topic, published in the May 2007 issue of Diabetes Care, has concluded that chromium supplementation is probably not helpful for most people with Type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks

Updated

An analysis of data from multiple clinical trials has shown that people with Type 2 diabetes who take the oral drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) have a 43% increased risk of having a heart attack. The results of this study, known as a meta-analysis (which combines and analyzes data from other studies), was published in the online edition of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) on May 21.

Recipe of the Week: Pear and peanut butter breakfast stacks

Updated

Who says you have to eat traditional “breakfast foods” for breakfast? These easy-to-assemble pear, peanut butter, and graham cracker “stacks” make a hearty breakfast filled with fiber and healthful monounsaturated fat. For other creative breakfast ideas, see Amy Campbell’s blog entry this week.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Preventing Coronary Heart Disease

Updated

It’s important to know what steps you can take to guard against heart disease, especially in light of the news this week that Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) may increase the risk of heart attack and death from cardiovascular causes. This article focuses on risk factors that can be modified and questions you can ask your health-care provider to make sure that you are taking all the right preventive steps.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Psychological Technique Helps Women With Diabetes Lose Weight

Updated

A new study of overweight women with Type 2 diabetes showed that the addition of a technique called “motivational interviewing” to a weight-loss program helped women lose more weight and keep it off more successfully. The study was published in the May 2007 issue of the journal Diabetes Care.

What We’re Reading: Special Workstation Burns Extra Calories

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this story at www.medlineplus.gov at, a Web site run by the National Institutes of Health, about a workstation that combines a treadmill with a computer. This special desk, which was developed at the Mayo Clinic, helped obese people burn extra calories compared to sitting at a regular desk in a recent study.

You can also learn more about the study and see a picture of the workstation in this article at the Canadian news Web site cbc.ca.

Recipe of the Week: Banana nut bran muffins

Updated

Think you don’t have time for breakfast? Think again! You can whip up a batch of these fiber-rich muffins in less than an hour on the weekend, then freeze the leftovers for a delicious, microwave-and-go breakfast on busy weekday mornings. For more information on the benefits of breakfast, check out Amy Campbell’s blog entry this week.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Selecting an Insulin Program for Type 1 Diabetes

Updated

In their blog entries this week, Andy Stuckey talks about trying a new insulin pen for his mealtime insulin and Amy Campbell discusses basal, or background, insulin rates and morning blood glucose levels. This article from the archives delves further into different insulin delivery options and regimens, including multiple daily injection programs and insulin pump therapy.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Good and Bad News About Diabetes and Cancer

Updated

Two studies published in the past few weeks have examined ways in which diabetes, cancer, and their treatments affect one another. While one study found that having diabetes is associated with a worse cancer outcome, another found that a class of diabetes drugs may lower the risk of one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

Recipe of the Week: Savory spinach scramble

Updated

Whether you’re looking for a quick, low-carbohydrate breakfast or dinner option, this scrambled spinach-and-egg dish could hardly be easier. This recipe jazzes things up with a few bacon bits; look for lower-sodium canned spinach (or use thawed frozen spinach) to cut down on the sodium content.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Carbohydrate Factors

Updated

While this week’s blog entry “Low Blood Glucose Doesn’t Affect Brain Function” shares the good news that severe hypoglycemia does not appear to do any lasting damage to the brain, it is still a situation that is best avoided if at all possible. If you use insulin, one way to avoid hypoglycemia is to match your premeal doses to your food intake as accurately as possible. This article can teach both people who use insulin and those who don’t how to use a gram scale and a food’s “carbohydrate factor” to figure out the precise amount of carbohydrate in any portion of food.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Recipe of the Week: Two-minute turkey wrap

Updated

As the weather gets warmer, it’s a great time to brown-bag it and enjoy your lunch outdoors in a nearby park or green space. This wrap, which features protein-rich turkey and cheese and the pungent taste of horseradish sauce, is a cinch to assemble and travels easily. Choose a whole-grain tortilla for extra fiber.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Getting a Hand from Social Agencies

Updated

If you find yourself in need of help from a volunteer or government agency, this article by nurse and health educator David Spero can help guide you through the process. Its advice and resources can assist you if you need to go on disability, apply for monetary aid, or qualify for reduced-cost drugs from a pharmaceutical company, for example.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Low Testosterone Levels and Type 2 Diabetes

Updated

A new study has found that a significant number of men who have Type 2 diabetes may have low testosterone levels, a condition that can trigger erectile dysfunction but can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy.

Recipe of the Week: Chicken, broccoli, and rice bake

Updated

If you’re looking for a hearty meal that’s simple to assemble and easy to freeze, look no further than this layered casserole. It can be thrown together easily with convenience foods, including frozen broccoli, canned soup, and precooked chicken. Feel free to substitute leftover or precooked brown rice for the white rice to up the fiber and nutrients even more.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Go Ahead, Pick Your Pump

Updated

Does this week’s news about a new insulin pump model have you interesting in pumping? Whether you’re a long-time pump user or in the market for your first insulin pump, you should check out this article from the archives by diabetes educator Gary Scheiner. It covers features a person should consider when choosing a pump and includes analysis of many of the latest models to hit the market.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What We’re Reading: Arthritis Drug Researched for Treating Diabetes

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to the following articles at www.medlineplus.gov, a Web site run by the National Institutes of Health, and diabetes.about.com, a diabetes blog written by practicing nurse Debra Manzella. The articles are about a recent clinical trial of anakinra, an injected drug that is used to treat juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The trial found that it also holds some promise for helping to manage Type 2 diabetes.

The study was published in The New England Journal of Medicine on April 12.

Recipe of the Week: Berries with brown sugar cream

Updated

You may have noticed more fresh strawberries for sale at your local market recently since they’re starting to come into season around the United States. This simple dessert tops fresh berries with a dollop of sweetened, reduced-fat cream. Feel free to vary the proportions of the different berries according to your liking and their availability.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Boning Up on Bone Health

Updated

In addition to the functions of potassium that Amy Campbell mentions in her blog entry this week, getting enough of this mineral in your diet can also help maintain bone health. What other factors can help your bones stay strong? This article from the archives covers the effect of diabetes on the bones, risk factors for osteoporosis (degenerative bone disease), and steps you can take to prevent and treat the condition.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What We’re Reading: Hypoglycemia Mix-Up Leads to Arrest

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this article at www.sfgate.com, the Web site of the San Francisco Chronicle, about bodybuilder and current “Mr. Universe” Doug Burns. Last week, Mr. Burns, who has Type 1 diabetes, became involved in an altercation with police and was arrested after being mistaken for intoxicated when he was actually experiencing hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose.

You can also read reactions to this story by diabetes bloggers at www.sixuntilme.com, and www.diabetesmine.com.

Recipe of the Week: Carrot oat bran muffins

Updated

In her blog entry this week, Amy Campbell points out that substituting whole grains for refined grains in your diet can help lower triglyceride levels. Breakfast is an easy time to eat foods rich in whole grains such as these muffins, which feature whole wheat flour and oat bran (in addition to nutrient-rich carrots and zingy spices). And if you have whole-wheat pastry flour handy, you can substitute it for the all-purpose flour in the recipe to make these muffins 100% whole grain, a substitution that also adds an extra gram of fiber per muffin.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Diabetes and Your Marriage

Updated

How can diabetes affect an intimate relationship…and vice versa? This article explores this important subject and offers insight, based on interviews with 42 people with diabetes and their partners, about which kinds of behaviors are helpful and which aren’t.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

New Combination Diabetes Drug Janumet Approved

Updated

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Janumet, a pill that combines the two previously approved Type 2 diabetes drugs sitagliptin (brand name Januvia) and metformin (Glucophage and other names). Janumet is manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc., and is expected to be available in pharmacies nationwide soon.

What Were Reading: Diabetes Research

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.diabetesmine.com entitled “Clinical Studies 101A.” It provides information about how to get involved with the many clinical trials underway to improve diabetes treatment and search for a cure. The blog entry is written by Amy Tenderich, a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

Recipe of the Week: Mixed melon salad

Updated

As Jan Chait mentions in her blog entry this week, the produce section is a great place to find snacks that are kosher for Passover. When made with fresh pineapple, this juicy melon salad with a tangy homemade dressing fits the bill. It would also make a colorful and healthful addition to an Easter meal!

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Teaming Up for Better Diabetes Control

Updated

In two recent blog entries (”Get Thee to a Doctor’s Office!” and ”Regular Doctor Visits?”) Andy Stuckey reveals that he needs to make more frequent visits to his endocrinologist, who can be one important member of a diabetes care team. Do you know who the other members might be? This article from the archives explains who makes up a diabetes care team and what roles the members can play in helping you manage your diabetes.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What We’re Reading: Adam Morrison Receives AACE Award

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this article at www.aace.com, the Web site of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). The article is about Adam Morrison, an NBA basketball player with Type 1 diabetes, who just received the AACE’s Eugene T. Davidson, MD, Award for Public Service. The award honors his public appearances and outreach efforts to raise awareness about diabetes and its management.

Recipe of the Week: Simple beef stir-fry

Updated

Beef tenderloin is a good source of zinc, the benefits of which are highlighted this week in Amy Campbell’s blog entry. This dish featuring beef tenderloin and frozen stir-fry vegetables could hardly be easier to prepare, and it’s low in calories, fat, and carbohydrate to boot.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Approved for Kids

Updated

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new model of the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System for use in children aged 7 to 17 who have Type 1 diabetes. While multiple CGM systems have come onto the market over the past year, they were previously only approved for adults. Now, however, Medtronic’s REAL-Time CGM devices will be available in pediatric models of the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System and Guardian REAL-Time System.

What Were Reading: Symlin and Pregnancy

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.revolutionhealth.com entitled “Symlin—yes or no!?” The post, written by Kelly Close (a writer, editor, and consultant who has Type 1 diabetes), examines her dilemma about whether to use the injectable drug pramlintide (brand name Symlin) to help lower her HbA1c level during pregnancy.

For more information about Symlin, please visit Jan Chait’s blog entry “Symlin: Sometimes the Positives Outweigh the Negatives.”

Recipe of the Week: Country French barley vegetable potage

Updated

As Amy Campbell mentions in her blog entry this week, barley is rich in soluble fiber, which in turn can help lower cholesterol levels. This recipe combines sautéed fresh vegetables with barley, French seasonings, and a beefy broth to make a satisfying and heart-healthy soup.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Getting Down to Basals

Updated

Last week’s blog entry ”Inhaled Insulin Passes Test for Safety” reported on a new study about Exubera, the fast-acting, inhaled insulin product that can be used to cover carbohydrate intake at meals. This article from the archives discusses another kind of insulin: basal, or background, insulin. It answers questions about what basal insulin is, how much a person needs, different options for delivering it, and when it should be taken.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Inhaled Insulin Passes Test for Safety

Updated

Inhaled insulin (brand name Exubera) has been getting some negative press lately, focusing on its high price, large inhaler, slow sales, and concerns about its effects on lung function. While the results of a new study may not be able to do much to address the first three issues, they have shown inhaled insulin to be safe for the lungs and effective for diabetes management over a two-year period of use.

What Were Reading: More on Depression, Diabetes, and Heart Disease

Updated

Recently on The Diabetes Self-Management Blog, psychotherapist Joe Nelson wrote a blog entry about research that linked having depression to a higher risk of developing heart disease. On a related note, we’d like to direct your attention this week to this post at www.thediabetesblog.com entitled “Diabetes, Depression and Heart Disease—A Dangerous Mix.” It discusses another recent study that has shown an increased risk of dying in people who have Type 2 diabetes, depression, and heart disease. This blog entry is written by health writer Chris Sparling.

You can also read more about the study in this story on the American Diabetes Association’s Web site.

For more information about getting help for depression or other mental health issues, please visit the Emotional Health section of our Web site. For more information about preventing and treating heart disease, please visit Heart Health.

Recipe of the Week: Yogurt dip

Updated

Raw garlic may not do much for high cholesterol levels (see Amy Campbell’s blog entry this week), but it still packs a flavorful punch in recipes like this yogurt dip, which you can serve with raw vegetables, pita slices, or gyros. And according to this week’s diabetes news, the dairy calcium in the yogurt may even help you lose weight!

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Urinary Incontinence

Updated

Sometimes diabetes, gynecological issues (such as those Jan Chait writes about in her blog entry this week), and urinary problems go hand in hand. In fact, women with diabetes have a 70% higher chance of developing urinary incontinence (the involuntary loss of urine) than those without. This article describes the different types of incontinence and several methods of treatment, including bladder retraining, drug therapy, and inserted devices.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What’s For Breakfast? Whole Grains and Calcium!

Updated

“What should I eat?” is one of the most common questions asked by people with diabetes, and for good reason. With almost every bite of food there are carbohydrates to count, not to mention calories, fat, vitamins, and minerals to consider. Two new studies may not have all the answers, but their results may help narrow the field down when it comes to breakfast choices for people with diabetes who are trying to lose weight and protect their hearts.

What We’re Reading: Be On Diabetes TV

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.dlife.com/blog entitled “Be a Part of dLife TV.” This blog entry explains that dLife TV, the national weekly television show about diabetes that airs every Sunday evening on CNBC, is looking for people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes—as well as partners, parents, or children of people with diabetes—to participate in “Roundtable Discussions” that will be taped for television. The discussions will be taped in Westport, Connecticut, in April.

For more information about the show and contact information if you’re interested in participating, click here.

Diabetes Drug Linked to Fracture Risk

Updated

Data from multiple studies have shown that taking the Type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) may put women at higher risk for a variety of bone fractures.

What We’re Reading: Exubera Floundering?

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to two blog posts about Exubera, the inhaled insulin product that was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and has not yet been as successful as some analysts had predicted.

The first post, found at www.thediabetesblog.com, critiques manufacturer Pfizer’s plan to begin advertising Exubera directly to patients. This blog entry is written by Allie Beatty, a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

The second post, found at www.diabetesmine.com, reports on recent press treatment of Exubera and the opinions of both industry experts and users on the product’s viability. That blog entry is written by Amy Tenderich, a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

Article of the Week: Exercising With an Insulin Pump

Updated

Many people with Type 1 diabetes, and an increasing number of people with Type 2, use an insulin pump to control their diabetes. This article explains how to use a pump’s special features to accommodate an exercise routine. It also addresses the timing of exercise and certain pump-specific exercise issues, such as infusion-site care and controlling the temperature of insulin in hot or cold environments.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

New Guidelines for Lowering Women’s Heart and Stroke Risks

Updated

The American Heart Association released updated guidelines this week for preventing cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke) in women. The guidelines, which were published in a special issue of the journal Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, provide new information on how aspirin, hormone therapy, and supplements should (or should not) be used in women for cardiovascular disease prevention.

What We’re Reading: Splenda vs. Stevia

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.mydiabetescentral.com entitled “Splenda or Stevia?” This blog entry is written by David Mendosa, a medical writer with Type 2 diabetes, and details his reasons for switching back and forth between the two noncaloric sweeteners.

For more information about various sweeteners on the market, check out dietitian Amy Campbell’s blog entries on “Satisfying Your Sweet Tooth With Low-Calorie Sweeteners”: Part 1 and Part 2.

Trans Fat Alternative May Raise Blood Glucose

Updated

Since trans fat labeling became mandatory on Nutrition Facts panels in 2006, food manufacturers have been working to get sources of artificial trans fat (which is created through a chemical process known as “partial hydrogenation”) out of their products.

What Were Reading: Diabetes and Disordered Eating

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at diabetes.about.com entitled “Eating Disorders in Teens with Type 1 Diabetes.” The post examines a new study that shows that eating disorders are twice as common in teenage girls with Type 1 diabetes than in their peers who don’t have diabetes. It includes information on warning signs for eating disorders and the dangers of insulin dose manipulation for weight control.

The About Diabetes blog is written by Debra Manzella, a writer and practicing nurse.

Recipe of the Week: Simple grilled salmon

Updated

The American Heart Association recommends that people with coronary heart disease eat fish (particularly fatty fish, like salmon) at least twice a week. Fatty fish is a good source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. This fast, single-serving salmon recipe can easily help a person up his fish intake. If winter weather doesn’t permit outdoor grilling, you can prepare this recipe on an indoor electric grill or under the broiler in your oven.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Heart Attack

Updated

Do you know the risk factors for a heart attack? The symptoms? If you or a friend or family member were experiencing symptoms, would you know what steps to take? This article is full of essential information on the topic, including what a heart attack is, how to go about preventing one, and why people with diabetes often have atypical heart attack symptoms.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Diabetes and Erectile Dysfunction: Two New Studies

Updated

Two recent studies offer information and hope to men who have diabetes and erectile dysfunction. The studies have indicated that healthy lifestyle changes as well as certain medicines can help men with diabetes improve their sexual function.

What We’re Reading: Diabetes in the Budget

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at http://closeconcerns.typepad.com entitled “Squeezed Again: Political Leadership Needed to Reverse Budget Trends in Diabetes.” It discusses the amount of funding earmarked for diabetes research and wellness programs in President Bush’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2008, and whether diabetes has received its “fair share.”

This post is written by James S. Hirsch, a principal at the diabetes consulting firm Close Concerns who lives with Type 1 diabetes. He is also the author of the book Cheating Destiny: Life With Diabetes, America’s Biggest Epidemic.

Recipe of the Week: Sun-dried tomato hummus wraps

Updated

Homemade hummus (made here with garbanzo beans, sesame seed paste, garlic, lemon juice, sun-dried tomatoes, and spices) livens up these fiber- and protein-rich sandwiches, which also feature smoked turkey and asparagus. To cut down on the sodium content, look for lower-sodium beans, flatbread, and turkey breast, and substitute extra spices for most or all of the salt in the hummus.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Dealing With Meal Plan Blahs

Updated

Interested in spicing up your diabetes meal plan? This article from the archives can give you the tools to adjust your meal plan to best suit your preferences and needs. It contains shopping and meal-planning tips, lists of carbohydrate choices and low-carbohydrate foods, and even advice on handling “splurges.”

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Two Studies Call for Online Participants

Updated

Have you ever felt interested in taking part in a study, but figured that you didn’t have enough time or lived too far from a research center to do it? Well, your opportunity to participate may have arrived. Two Web-based medical studies are looking for participants with diabetes, and all you need is Internet access to be a part of them.

What We’re Reading: The Western Diet

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This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.thediabetesblog.com, entitled “Ignoring the elephant in the room: the Western diet.” The post discusses topics brought up in a recent article in The New York Times, including typical American eating patterns and their effects on health, confusing and conflicting advice from scientists and the media, and how people should overhaul their diets to better combat chronic disease.

This entry is written by health blogger Diane Rixon.

Recipe of the Week: Colorful vegetable casserole

Updated

Getting more colorful vegetables on your plate not only makes food easier to see, but ups your intake of an important variety of vitamins, minerals, and other healthful plant substances. Feel free to vary some of the vegetables and seasonings in this casserole to your liking.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Tools and Techniques for Visual Impairment

Updated

Did you know that changing the color of text to create more contrast with the background—as we’ve recently done on our Web site—makes it easier to read what’s on a computer screen if you have low vision? In fact, that’s just one of many techniques that can help make daily living easier for a person with visual impairment. This article from the archives is full of tips, tricks, and information about products that can help people with low vision carry out their day-to-day tasks, including diabetes tasks.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

How Much of a Risk Factor is Ethnicity?

Updated

Three recent studies have shed some light on why particular ethnic groups seem to be at a higher risk for chronic health conditions such as heart disease and some types of cancer. It appears that certain modifiable lifestyle factors, often involving diet, may be largely responsible for the variations in disease risk factors between different ethnic groups.

What We’re Reading: Interview With an Exubera User

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This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.diabetesmine.com entitled “Followup with a Real, Live Exubera User.” In the post, blogger Amy Tenderich interviews Jennifer Haws, who has been using Exubera inhaled insulin for three months. The blog entry features practical questions about inhaling insulin as well as links to a recent Los Angeles Times article about Exubera and to Amy’s original interview with Jennifer when she first began to use Exubera.

Amy Tenderich is a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

Do you have any experiences with Exubera that you’d like to share? If so, please let us know what you think by leaving a comment on this post.

Recipe of the Week: Roasted garlic-Parmesan cauliflower

Updated

Trying to get more vegetables into your diet, but not sure where to start? Try this simple recipe, which jazzes up a head of cauliflower with a splash of olive oil, a few cloves of fresh garlic, and a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese. While the dish roasts in the oven, you’re free to prepare the rest of your meal.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Healthy Aging With Diabetes

Updated

Do you know how getting older can affect diabetes, and vice versa? This article from the magazine archives explains how the aging process works, how diabetes can contribute to it, how getting older can impact diabetes control, and how to remain vital as the years go by.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What We’re Reading: The O.C. New Me Challenge

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to the new blog http://ocnewme.blogspot.com, home of the “O.C. New Me Challenge.” This challenge, created by Diabetes O.C. blogger Allison Blass, encourages people to challenge themselves to lose weight, lower their HbA1c levels, or both over the coming year by wagering a minimum of $5 on their outcome. Every month, prizes (including a one-year subscription to Diabetes Self-Management magazine) will be raffled off to people who meet incremental goals.

Sign-ups close tomorrow, so click on the link above to visit the blog if you think you may be interested in joining the challenge.

Recipe of the Week: Orange pecan whole wheat scones

Updated

This is the season for citrus fruits, so you may find yourself stocking up on oranges and grapefruits. This recipe puts both the juice and the peel of oranges to good use, infusing these fiber-rich scones with citrus flavor. They’re great for a winter weekend breakfast, warm and fresh out of the oven.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Eight Tips for Managing Diabetes Distress

Updated

Some people call it “diabetes burnout,” others call it “diabetes distress.” Whatever you call it, you’ve probably felt overwhelmed, frustrated, or anxious about diabetes-related tasks at some point. This article from the magazine archives, written by a clinical psychologist and professor, offers eight pieces of advice on how to deal actively with feelings of distress and depression that can be brought on by diabetes and the challenge of managing it.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

DiabetesSelfManagement.com Wins Two Blog Awards!

Updated

We are pleased to announce that The Diabetes Self-Management Blog has won two 2007 Diabetes O.C. Blog Awards: “Best Blog,” and “Best Diabetes News Blog.” These distinctions are especially meaningful to us because they have been awarded by the very people we exist to serve: our readers. Many thanks to all who took the time to vote.

More Counterfeit OneTouch Test Strips Found

Updated

As we reported in a previous post, several lots of fake test strips meant for use with LifeScan’s OneTouch blood glucose meters were found in October 2006. Recently, LifeScan and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have updated their alerts to include two more counterfeit lot numbers.

What We’re Reading: Obesity Arguments

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at http://closeconcerns.typepad.com entitled “Better Fit or Fat? The New Republic’s argument for obesity.” The post examines the controversial argument that it isn’t body fat per se, but a lifestyle that includes little physical activity, that is the real threat to Americans’ health.

The Close Concerns weblog is written by the team at Close Concerns, a diabetes consulting firm founded and run by Kelly Close, who lives with Type 1 diabetes.

Diabetes Reversed in Mice Through Nervous System Treatment

Updated

Studies of mice performed by a Canadian-led research team have shown that the body’s nervous system appears to play an important, but previously unrecognized, role in triggering diabetes. This discovery led the researchers to develop a treatment protocol that reversed diabetes in mice and may have potential for treating humans.

What We’re Reading: Diabetes Year in Review

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.diabetesmine.com entitled “2006: Diabetes Year in Review.” In the post, blogger Amy Tenderich offers a comprehensive recap of the year’s diabetes research, news coverage, and new drugs and technology, complete with links. She also summarizes her own experiences and accomplishments as a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

Recipe of the Week: South African yellow rice with raisins

Updated

This traditional South African side dish is on the Christmas menu in many households in that country. Gaining a bright yellow color from turmeric and a sweet-and-tangy flavor from cinnamon, lemon, raisins, and a touch of sugar, it’s fast and easy to prepare in a single pot. Why not make this dish a striking and flavorful addition to your own holiday table?

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Understanding Insulin

Updated

In his blog entry this week, Andy Stuckey talks about how certain activities affect the action of the insulin he takes. This article from the archives delves further into the topic of insulin. It discusses the role that insulin plays in the body, different types of synthetic insulin that are on the market, available methods of insulin delivery, and challenges of insulin therapy, including hypoglycemia.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Diet vs. Exercise for Weight Loss

Updated

As we reported a few weeks ago, recent research has shown that any kind of exercise can help people with diabetes improve their blood glucose control. Now, a new study has shown that diet and exercise can be equally effective at stimulating weight loss and improving Type 2 diabetes risk factors. However, data from the same study also shows that dieting without exercise can increase a person’s risk of bone loss.

What We’re Reading: Vote for Blog Awards!

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this page at http://diabetesoc.blogspot.com where you can vote for the winners of the 2nd Annual Diabetes O.C. Blog Choice Awards. Thanks to your votes during the nomination period, Diabetes Self-Management has been nominated for “Best Blog” and “Best Professional News Blog”!

Voting for the winners only goes through the end of December, so if you have a moment, please click on the above link, then click on “VOTE NOW” to cast your ballot. We thank you for your continued support!

The Diabetes O.C. (short for Online Community) is a Web site that serves as a gateway to the many other diabetes blogs on the Internet. So if you like reading diabetes blogs, don’t forget to visit The Diabetes O.C.’s directory, which arranges its member blogs into various categories, making it easy to find the kind of blog you are looking for.

Recipe of the Week: Seasoned Brussels sprouts

Updated

This nourishing vegetable dish is spruced up with garlic and ginger and garnished with toasted almonds (the health benefits of which Amy Campbell explains in her blog entry this week). Brussels sprouts are a “cool season” crop related to cabbages and other leafy greens; you should be able to find them fresh or frozen at your grocery store. (Note: If you’re watching your sodium intake, you may want to cut down on the added salt in this dish or replace it with a salt-free spice mixture.)

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Helping Young Children Succeed With Diabetes Care

Updated

This article from the Diabetes Self-Management archives, written by a pediatric specialist from the Joslin Diabetes Center, covers a wide variety of issues having to do with kids and diabetes. The article discusses how children feel about insulin injections and blood glucose monitoring, their psychological reactions to having diabetes, and how to help them build their coping skills.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

What We’re Reading: Rodent Research

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to two blog posts on the topic of rodent research and diabetes. The first post, found at www.thediabetesblog.com, covers the latest development in the ongoing testing of a protocol that reverses Type 1 diabetes in mice. This blog entry is written by Allie Beatty, a writer with Type 1 diabetes.

The second post, found at http://blogs.healthcentral.com/diabetes, discusses a new study of insulin resistance in rats and reminds people to be wary of how the media can exaggerate the applicability of rodent research to humans. That blog entry is written by Dr. Bill Quick, a physician who also has diabetes.

Recipe of the Week: Holiday turkey noodle soup mix

Updated

Looking for a homemade holiday gift? This low-sodium, high-flavor soup mix will come in handy in anyone’s kitchen; in fact, you may want to keep some on hand for your own cupboard! Combined with fresh vegetables and some leftover turkey or chicken, it makes a warming first course or light meal. Look for whole-wheat egg noodles to up the fiber content.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Generic Drugs

Updated

This article from the Diabetes Self-Management archives explains how generic drugs come to market, how they can save you money, and which diabetes drugs are currently available in generic form.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Statin Studies Show Important Benefits for People With Diabetes

Updated

Two recent studies have confirmed the benefits of therapy with statins, a class of prescription drugs also known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that lowers cholesterol levels. The studies demonstrated that statins can help prevent cardiovascular “events,” such as heart attacks, both in people with diabetes who don’t have cardiovascular disease and in those who have already had a heart attack or episode of severe angina (chest pain associated with heart disease).

What We’re Reading: “His First Syringe”

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.sixuntilme.com. In it, blogger Kerri relates the story of teaching her partner, Chris, how to give her an insulin injection. This blog is written by Kerri Morrone, a writer and editor with Type 1 diabetes.

And as a reminder, today is the final day during which you can nominate The Diabetes Self-Managment Blog for “Best Blog” and “Best Professional News Blog” over at The Diabetes O.C.. You can go straight to the nominating page, or read more about the awards in this previous “What We’re Reading” post.

Antioxidant ALA Eases Pain From Diabetic Neuropathy

Updated

In a new study published in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care, the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (or ALA), taken in pill form, lessened pain in people with diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage resulting from diabetes. Previous research has shown that intravenous ALA therapy can help to reduce pain and numbness due to diabetic neuropathy, but treatment with ALA in pill form has not been widely studied.

Recipe of the Week: Creamy Pumpkin Pie

Updated

Need a last-minute dessert for Thanksgiving? Don’t stress: This easy, no-bake pumpkin pie requires little more than a mixing bowl and some refrigerator space to prepare. Relying on items such as canned pumpkin, pudding mix, and a store-bought graham cracker crust, the pie can be assembled in a flash—just leave enough time (at least 3 hours) for it to chill!

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

What We’re Reading: Diabetes and Gum Disease

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at http://blogs.healthcentral.com/diabetes about the connections between diabetes and gum disease. This blog entry is written by David Mendosa, a medical writer with Type 2 diabetes, and discusses a new study on the subject as well as David’s personal experiences controlling gum disease and diabetes.

Speaking of oral health (and health in general!), today is the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout. Click here for more information about smoking less, quitting for the day, or quitting for good.

Recipe of the Week: Fresh Cranberry Relish

Updated

If you’ve only ever had cranberry sauce from a can, this no-cook combination of fresh oranges, apples, and cranberries will be a Thanksgiving revelation. Sweetened with sucralose (brand name Splenda), this relish weighs in at only one carbohydrate choice for a generous half-cup serving.

Click here for the recipe.

And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section!

Article of the Week: Avoiding Eye Complications

Updated

This article from the Diabetes Self-Management archives lays out prevention strategies and explains how blood glucose control, blood pressure control, and other steps can help a person with diabetes avoid eye complications.

Click here to read the article.

And remember that articles on a wide variety of diabetes topics are always available in our magazine archives section!

Joslin Launches Free Online Diabetes Videos

Updated

Just in time for American Diabetes Month, Joslin Diabetes Center has added a series of six free, short videos to its Web site. The series, entitled Staying Healthy with Diabetes, features expert physicians from Joslin Clinic and presents information about six important medical tests that people with diabetes should have done regularly to keep tabs on their health. These tests are the HbA1c test (or A1C test, which indicates blood glucose control over time), blood pressure test, eye exam, foot exam, kidney function test, and lipid profile (which includes cholesterol and triglycerides).

What We’re Reading: Nominate us for “Best Blog”!

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at http://diabetesoc.blogspot.com about the 2nd Annual Diabetes O.C. Blog Choice Awards. The Diabetes O.C. (short for Online Community) is a Web site that serves as a gateway to the many other diabetes blogs on the Internet.

This month, The Diabetes O.C. is opening the floor for nominations for their “best blog” awards, and The Diabetes Self-Management Blog is eligible in the “Best Blog” and “Best Professional News Blog” categories! So if you like what you’ve been reading here over the past few months, please take a minute to click on the above link, then click on “Select your favorite blogs as nominees!” and choose Diabetes Self-Management from the choices listed. Nominations close on November 30.

And if you like reading diabetes blogs, don’t forget to visit The Diabetes O.C.’s directory, which arranges its member blogs into various categories, making it easy to find the kind of blog you are looking for.

Proposed Trans Fat Ban and Calorie Listing Sparks Debate

Updated

The New York City Board of Health and Mental Hygiene has proposed plans to require the phasing out of heart-damaging, artificial trans fats in all of the city’s 24,000 restaurants, and also to require some of those restaurants to post calorie counts for their products on menus and menu boards. The proposals have excited supporters and detractors and triggered national debate.

What We’re Reading: Thanksgiving

Updated

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at www.diabetesdaily.com about handling Thanksgiving (yes, it’s almost that time already!) when you have diabetes. It contains several tips and also links to a forum where people can discuss their holiday plans. This blog entry is written by David Edelman.

(“What We’re Reading” is a new feature on The Diabetes Self-Management Blog in which we highlight interesting posts on other diabetes blogs out there on the Web.)

What We’re Reading

Updated

“What We’re Reading” is a new feature on The Diabetes Self-Management Blog in which we highlight interesting posts on other diabetes blogs out there on the Web.

(What’s a blog, you ask? It’s short for “weblog,” and you’re reading one right now! Learn more about blogs from our earlier post on the topic.)

This week, we’d like to direct your attention to this post at diabetes.about.com about Wal-Mart’s new generic drug program, which will offer month-long supplies of 314 of the most commonly prescribed generic drugs for $4.00 apiece. This blog is written by Debra Manzella, a writer and practicing nurse.

Public Warned About Fake OneTouch Test Strips

Updated

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting people with diabetes to watch out for counterfeit blood glucose test strips intended for use with various models of LifeScan’s OneTouch blood glucose meters. While this announcement was originally made last Friday, October 13, additional lots of counterfeit test strips have been discovered over the past few days.

New Diabetes Drug Januvia Approved by FDA

Updated

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new oral diabetes drug on Tuesday, October 17. The drug, sitagliptin (brand name Januvia), is manufactured by the pharmaceutical company Merck & Co., Inc., and is meant for use in people with Type 2 diabetes. Januvia is the first drug in a new class called dipeptidyl peptidase IV (or DPP-4) inhibitors to be approved.

Accu-Chek Insulin Pump Hits U.S. Market

Updated

The Accu-Chek Spirit insulin pump, manufactured in Switzerland by Disetronic Medical Systems (a subsidiary of Roche Diagnostics Corp.), is now available in the United States. The pump “system,” which includes the Spirit insulin pump, a Palm PDA with Accu-Chek Pocket Compass software, a choice of one of three Accu-Chek blood glucose meters, and a choice of carrying case, will begin shipping on October 30.

Not Taking Prescribed Drugs Linked with Death in People with Diabetes

Updated

A recently published study of over 11,500 people with diabetes showed that a significant number—21%—do not take their blood-pressure–lowering, cholesterol-lowering, or blood-glucose–lowering pills regularly. Not surprisingly, the study found that these people have higher blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and HbA1c levels (a measure of blood glucose over time). They also have a much higher chance of being hospitalized or dying than people who take their medicines regularly.

Mixed Results in Islet Transplantation Study

Updated

For years, the transplantation of insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells has held promise as a potential cure for Type 1 diabetes. Now, a new study has shown that while transplantation can help recipients improve their blood glucose control, the transplanted cells tend to lose function progressively, requiring most recipients to resume insulin injections within two years.

BD Blood Glucose Meter Discontinued

Updated

The medical technology company BD announced yesterday that it has decided to exit the blood glucose monitoring market and will stop distribution of its BD Logic Blood Glucose Monitor immediately.

Flu Shot Especially Important for People with Cardiovascular Disease

Updated

Believe it or not, flu season is approaching, and it’s not too early to start thinking about getting your annual vaccination. The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology are advising all people with cardiovascular disease to get a flu shot because their risk of dying from influenza (“the flu”) is higher than that of any other group. Cardiovascular disease (which includes heart disease and stroke) is the most common long-term complication of diabetes.

 

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