Diabetes Self-Management VideosPeripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, is a condition in which arteries leading to the legs, feet, and sometimes arms become narrowed, blocking blood flow and causing symptoms such as cramping, pain, or tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs. Having diabetes puts a person at increased risk of developing PAD. This video interview with diabetes expert Enrico Cagliero, MD, MPH, addresses common risk factors for and symptoms of PAD, approaches that can be used to reduce the risk of developing PAD, and treatment options that are available for those who are dealing with this painful condition.

 

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More about Peripheral Arterial Disease

Diabetic Leg Pain and Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cramping, pain, or tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs – these may not sound like symptoms of a serious condition. In fact, many people believe that they are normal signs of aging. But they can be signs of peripheral arterial disease, a severe condition that can lead to gangrene and amputation if left untreated. So if you have these symptoms, be sure to tell your doctor.

Have Calf Cramps? Strengthening Your Hip Muscles May Help

If you have peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, you are likely all too familiar with the leg pain and cramping that is characteristic of this condition. But according to new research from Japan, exercises that strengthen the hips may reduce calf cramps for people with PAD.

In PAD, the arteries that lead to the legs, feet, and sometimes arms, become clogged with fatty deposits, which reduce or block blood flow to the affected areas. Causing symptoms such as cramping, pain, or tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs, the condition affects between 8 million and 12 million Americans, with those who have diabetes more likely to develop PAD than the general population.

How Much Do You Know About Peripheral Arterial Disease?

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a condition in which arteries become narrowed, blocking circulation and potentially causing serious damage. This can happen in the arteries that supply blood to the abdominal organs, such as the intestines and kidneys, as well as the arteries of the arms and especially the legs and feet. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing PAD than people who don’t have diabetes.