Diabetes Self-Management VideosHypoglycemia: Part 2

Click here to watch Hypoglycemia: Part 1

Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, is one of the most feared consequences of diabetes treatment in people who use certain diabetes medicines. Part 2 of this video interview series with Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, the AADE’s 2014 Educator of the Year, addresses strategies for preventing lows.

 

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More about Hypoglycemia: Part 2

Take a Bite Out of Hypoglycemia

Is it really possible to have too much of a good thing? Take my own “good things” list as an example. I really enjoy taking my kids to ballgames, eating popcorn at the movies, and lying on the beach. Good things, yes, but only in moderation. If left unchecked, I might become broke, obese, and badly sunburned.

For millions of people with diabetes, insulin and oral medicines that stimulate the pancreas to release more of its own insulin are good things. Without them, blood glucose levels would become wildly out of control. But when taken in too great a quantity, they can produce the opposite extreme: low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia.

Exorcising the Specter of Overnight Hypoglycemia

Is it really possible to have too much of a good thing? Take my own “good things” list as an example. I really enjoy taking my kids to ballgames, eating popcorn at the movies, and lying on the beach. Good things, yes, but only in moderation. If left unchecked, I might become broke, obese, and badly sunburned.

Treating Hypoglycemia

For millions of people with diabetes who take insulin or medicines that stimulate the pancreas to release more insulin, hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) is an ever-present threat lurking in the shadows. And few things instill more fear in parents of children with diabetes and partners of adults with diabetes – not to mention people with diabetes themselves – than hypoglycemia that occurs in the middle of the night.