Diabetes Self-Management Blog

Each year, more than 15,000 children and 15,000 adults in the United States are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Often times, this diagnosis is not made until the person has been hospitalized with a condition such a diabetic ketoacidosis (in which toxic by-products of fat metabolism known as ketones build up in the blood).

That’s why the charity Diabetes UK and the JDRF have launched a campaign to spread awareness of the symptoms of Type 1. Before World Diabetes Day on November 14, they hope to reach one million viewers with a video that describes the symptoms in straightforward terms and includes interviews with families whose children have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes.

Karen Addington, Chief Executive of JDRF, notes that “If a child is showing any of these symptoms, it’s vital that they get medical attention immediately: even waiting 24 hours can be dangerous. A simple finger prick blood glucose test can diagnose Type 1 diabetes instantly; early diagnosis can prevent a child from becoming very ill, and even save their life.”

To watch the video, click here.

This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell.

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Comments
  1. A simple blood test should be required each and every year, along with all the immunizations, visual and hearing tests required for school age children. My T1D child was diagnosed at age 17 after a horrible 10 years of pain,suffering, many specialists and extensive testing with “nothing found”. A travesty. Our primary care had not tested her for diabetes and it never occured to me to ask. As this epidemic grows, a simple blood test every year is an easy way to go and the very least that could be done.

    Posted by Cindy |
  2. Can I commend you on the campaign to increase awareness of Type 1. As a Type 1 diabetic living in Oz I continue to get frustrated by our media’s constant focus on Type 2.
    If you ever decide to start an international campaign please contact me as Id love to get involved.

    Posted by NiceDiabetes |

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