Thyroid Awareness Month

Last week we reviewed several glaucoma resources in honor of Glaucoma Awareness Month. This week, we’d like to take a look at some resources related to Thyroid Awareness Month, which also takes place in January.

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that plays an important role in various functions in the body, such as metabolism and bone growth. It is a part of the endocrine system, a network of hormone-producing glands and organs, of which the pancreas is also a part.


Thyroid disorders are more common in people with diabetes: Roughly one-third of those with Type 1 diabetes have a thyroid condition, and thyroid disorders are also common in people with Type 2.

The Patient Information Site of the American Thyroid Association includes frequently asked questions, Web brochures, and summaries of clinical research on thyroid disorders. A search feature is also available to find a thyroid specialist in your area.

The thyroid section of the Hormone Foundation’s Web site includes information on a variety of thyroid conditions, such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroid nodules. The section also covers strategies for maintaining thyroid health.

The Web site of the National Institutes of Health includes a thyroid resources section, which has information about screening and prevention, symptoms and diagnosis, and specific thyroid conditions. The site also features photos and videos related to thyroid health, as well as certain resources in Spanish. also features a variety of pieces on thyroid health, including diabetes dietitian Amy Campbell’s piece on eating for a healthy thyroid, endocrinologist Patricia Wu’s article on thyroid conditions and diabetes, and blogger Eric Lagergren’s chronicle of his experiences being treated for thyroid cancer while managing his Type 1 diabetes. (His first entry on the topic can be found here.)

This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell.

  • Ada Ryan

    I have just been told I have a “sluggish” thyroid. I have also started on a medicine for it. I don’t know what this means but I have never felt bad and still feel fine.

  • zubair

    very nice post i really like that stuff.

  • health500

    change your diet if you are not able to control thyroid levels…u can only control it