Diabetes Self-Management Blog

Sometimes I’m a ditz-brain. (To be fair, there are those who disagree, asking, "sometimes?")

For example, I needed to call somebody to get some information, but couldn’t find the notebook I’d jotted his number down in. Then I remembered: I’d called him from my cell phone only a week before. Scrolling through the calls, I found one that looked kind of familiar, pressed "send," and got an answer from somebody whose voice I didn’t recognize.

“This is Jan Chait,” I said, hoping the person would introduce herself and jump-start my memory.

“Hi!” she said with a smile in her voice. “How are you?”

“Um, OK…”

“I guess you want to speak to John.”

John, John, John…Hmmm, I pondered. Then decided there was nothing to do but ‘fess up.

“Actually, I was trying to call Dave, and thought this might be his number,” I said. “I have no idea who I called or who I’m talking to.”

Amidst laughter, Kim finally managed to choke out: “Kim? Of Kim and John?” Then I remembered: I’d called John the day after his mother’s funeral.

That was a harmless ditz-brain act. Sometimes, however, not paying attention can lead to consequences that are not so funny. Particularly when it comes to diabetes.

Several years ago, I gave myself my evening injection—and then realized I’d injected Regular, or short-acting insulin, rather than NPH, an intermediate-acting insulin, and had taken about four times the amount of Regular that I normally took at one time.

On the plus side, I realized my mistake. On the minus side, I was new enough at taking insulin not to know what to do to avoid a major case of hypoglycemia.

So I called Sonya, my C.D.E. Who told me to eat something really, really good. At the moment, I couldn’t think of anything that was “really, really gooder” than a fudgy, warm chocolate brownie topped with French vanilla ice cream, hot fudge sauce, and chocolate shavings. It worked, even with me telling the restaurant to hold the whipped cream, which I don’t care for, except for a dollop of fat-free frozen fake stuff to make sugar-free Jell-O more palatable.

Yes, I did have the sense not to drive myself; a friend who was visiting at the time did that…and then, laughing, told practically everybody at the restaurant that I had goofed on an insulin dose. (Actually, that does get dessert brought to you a lot faster than usual.)

One problem I no longer have is seeing my blood glucose level skyrocket because I forgot to take my insulin injection or, worse, plummet because I gave myself an injection, forgot that I’d done that, and gave myself another one. Oh, I still forget, but I can now check the memory on my insulin pump to see if I’ve given insulin to myself.

Another thing I forget on a regular basis is that I’m even wearing an insulin pump. It’s so much a part of me (we’re very attached to each other), that I take my nightshirt off, throw it on the bed—and go flying after it because I’ve forgotten I have a pump in the pocket.

Which reminds me of a related subject. Does anybody out there know who in the world still makes nightshirts with chest pockets? Nordstrom stopped making the ones with the fun prints that are like wearing a long, soft T-shirt. I don’t know how much longer I’ll be able to keep the ones I have together by repairing ripped seams and holes in the pocket. And they’re such nice, big pockets: large enough to keep both an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor within easy reach.

Even before that, Land’s End had stopped putting pockets on its nightshirts, basically saying that pockets were an unnecessary addition.

My opinion? You don’t have to use something that’s there, but you surely can’t use something that isn’t. If you’re like me and just about every other person who utilizes a medical device that is connected to your own, personal body, pockets are not only a convenience, but could be a necessity. So charge an extra quarter and put ‘em back on.

I guess ditz-brains can exist at the corporate level, too.

POST A COMMENT       
  

Comments
  1. Jan, I wear whatever kind of nightshirt or nightgown I want — usually soft and comfy. I use a safety pin to add a small sock or “footy sock” just inside the center front of the shirt/gown, and slide my pump into that. Viola! If I move around in my sleep, my pump goes with me. It’s not very “cool” looking, but it’s inexpensive and effective.

    Posted by Ann |
  2. There’s nothing saying you can’t add your own pocket to any nightshirt! If you can repair ripped seams, you can sew on a pocket, my friend. “Thimk” outside the box.
    ;-D

    Posted by Ephrenia |
  3. Hi Jan You may want to look at these pockets that can be sewn into your night clothes - http://www.pumpwearinc.com/sunshop/index.php?action=category&id=25

    Posted by mtggal |
  4. I have bought several items from Pump Wear Inc. for my daughter and she loves them. They have a nightshirt that zippers and has a really big pocket that i think will hold all the things you mention.
    keri

    Posted by kerigirl |
  5. Put pockets on pocketless nightshirts! Of course! Told you I was a ditz-brain! lol The sock thing is a good idea, Ann, but I must confess that the pocket is only for daytime. I kind of don’t wear stuff to bed. Since I work at home, I can work in my jammies - which is what I do. I want a pocket so ElvisToo and the CGM will be handy. Now I am going to go look for some funky nightshirts - hang the pockets - and put some on separately. What would I do without y’all?

    Posted by Jan Chait |
  6. I have to keep a notebook and write down when and how much insulin and what I have eaten or by night I am lost.
    Ditz brain–sounds right to me.

    Posted by Jude 48 |

Post a Comment

Note: All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to your sources. All commenters are considered to be nonmedical professionals unless explicitly stated otherwise. Promotion of your own or someone else's business or competing site is not allowed: Sharing links to sites that are relevant to the topic at hand is permitted, but advertising is not. Once submitted, comments cannot be modified or deleted by their authors. Comments that don't follow the guidelines above may be deleted without warning. Such actions are at the sole discretion of DiabetesSelfManagement.com. Comments are moderated Monday through Friday by the editors of DiabetesSelfManagement.com. The moderators are employees of R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc., and do not report any conflicts of interest. A privacy policy setting forth our policies regarding the collection, use, and disclosure of certain information relating to you and your use of this Web site can be found here. For more information, please read our Terms and Conditions.


Living With Diabetes
None of Us Is Alone (04/22/14)
Do You Feel Sexy? (04/15/14)
Spring Is Here (04/10/14)
In Sick Mode (04/03/14)

Insulin & Other Injected Drugs
FDA Approves Weekly Type 2 Diabetes Medicine (04/18/14)
Do You Know Your Insulin Level? (10/25/13)
Start With Three Drugs? (07/10/13)
FDA Patient Network Makes Its Debut (06/05/13)

 

 

Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor.


Carbohydrate Restriction: An Option for Diabetes Management
Some people find that decreasing the amount of carbohydrate they eat can help with blood glucose control. Here’s what to know about this approach.

Insulin Patch Pumps: A New Tool for Type 2
Patch pumps are simpler to operate than traditional insulin pumps and may be a good option for some people with Type 2 diabetes who need insulin.

How Much Do You Know About Vitamins?
Learn what these micronutrients can and can’t do for you.

Complete table of contents
Get a FREE ISSUE
Subscription questions