Diabetes Self-Management Blog

One of the many little voices in my head told me, as I contemplated what I should write this week, to not write about exercise again. I often listen to those voices because they’re kind of on the ball and help me to make good decisions. On Monday I decided I’d find something else to write about. Avoid the exercise topic! You see, it’s the time of year when topics aren’t coming to mind as easily as they did during the summer. I don’t know, I can’t explain it. To write about exercise, however, seemed too easy, something to avoid.

Then yesterday I read this article by Quinn Phillips. Good stuff. Highly recommend and recommend you post a comment. I wanted to comment on the piece, but I begged off. Quinn’s article focuses on exercise and Type 2 diabetes, which kept me at bay just enough to hush.

However, the topic went a ways in helping to silence that voice whispering to me what a good topic this week wasn’t.

“Eric,” that voice said, “Eric, maybe I was wrong. You ought to write about exercise.”

So in preparation for this week, I went back to the catalog of my blog entries and discovered this one, and also this: two entries out of over 150 that were about exercise. Oh, wait, I also found these two (1, (2), in which I wrote about embracing a higher HbA1C. I’m sure there are more, because no doubt I’ve mentioned the gym or working out in other blog entries.

But I guess what I’m trying to say is that I misremembered the number of entries in which I wrote about exercise. It hasn’t been all that many.

You know why? (Or at least you want to know what I think?) I think it’s because lately I’ve been doing it — exercise, that is — and thinking a lot about it (again, exercise). I love my workout routines. I look forward to the gym in a way that previously I’ve not experienced. And I’ve found incredible benefits to both diabetes and mental health in the past four months of a steady, dedicated workout routine than I expected.

Therefore, since I haven’t overdone the writing-about-exercise bit, I’m going to put together a series of entries over the next several weeks in which I talk about Eric Lagergren and exercise.

Here, then, is just some of what you can expect to hear about in the coming weeks:

  • Eric Lagergren’s history — his relationship — with physical activity, both before he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and currently.
  • Eric Lagergren’s thought processes and motivation in returning to an exercise routine after eight months of only moderate physical activity.
  • Eric Lagergren’s approach to exercise these days: what he does while at the gym; how he deals with his blood glucose; and how he keeps the negative thoughts about exercise, about body image, and all that sort of unhealthy thinking — which in the past allowed him to easily bypass the gym and head home to the TV — at bay. .

Because I’ve yet to suss out how I want to approach this, today you only get the vague bullet-point teaser. If, in reading this, you have some issues with exercise and would like to share them, please do. My canvas at this point is somewhat blank, even though I’ve many colors ready to splash up there.

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Comments
  1. Before I became totally insulin dependent I was shocked that my BG was higher after 6 Km of X-country skiing than before starting. Other diabetics may go low and that could be a deterrent. I wonder if this can be clarified or is each persons BG response to stress different? Or is it a type 1 vs type 2 difference?

    Posted by calgarydiabetic |
  2. re: calgary diabetic

    there is insufficient data to respond. ie
    - did you bottom out your blood glucose and cause emergency glucose add from liver. if so bs number can be higher than when you started.
    - i have watched this in detail and have watched bs drop. once too far, liver shoves to 268 or higher.
    - in faulty body when emergency liver sugar add in my body is on. i watch liver keep adding glucose when i walk and only shutting down when 500mg metformin is up to strength, and glucose add stops and bs starts dropping on every 1/4 mile lap of exercise loop.

    good luck

    Posted by jim snell |

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Type 1 Diabetes
Students With Diabetes Now Accepting 2015 Internship Applications (09/22/14)
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Exercise
BMX Camp for Kids With Type 1 Diabetes (07/31/14)
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2013 Conference on Diabetes and Exercise Available Online (12/05/13)

 

 

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