Diabetes Self-Management Blog

We’ve heard that diabetes is a chronic progressive illness. You can’t get better, you have to get worse. The best you can do is slow it down. But at least five approaches now claim to “reverse” Type 2. What does that mean?

The official expert line on Type 2 has long been that people start by controlling the condition with diet and exercise. But they move fairly quickly to pills (like metformin), then to insulin or insulin plus pills. In recent years, insulin has been started more quickly, and new drugs like the incretin mimetics are changing the progression of treatment. But it is still thought that the disease progresses and can’t be stopped.

Being told you are “chronic progressive” is like having a curse put on you. It can sap your confidence and destroy your hope. But is it true? Dozens of Diabetes Self-Management readers say no. On a blog post by Diane Fennell about a study of low-carb diets in Sweden, people commented eloquently on how they have gotten better by reducing carbohydrate intake.

Bob wrote: “By limiting carbs, my A1c dropped from an 8.6 to a most recent reading of 4.9. I also know people who eat whole-grain pasta, bread and have oatmeal every morning, because a doctor told them so, bemoaning their numbers.”

Following a different (acid/alkaline) diet, Dan wrote that his A1C dropped, and his cholesterol and blood pressure are normal. He’s off nearly all his statins, blood pressure medicines, and insulin.

Terri wrote: “I am a diabetic who eats a low carb vegan diet. I am far healthier now at 53 than ever before and maintain perfect glucose control.”

And on and on. It’s worth reading the whole thread, and there are scores of similar discussions all over the Internet. The reality is that people with Type 2 get better all the time. They reduce their medicines or get off them completely. Their glucose levels, cholesterol, and blood pressure come down and their symptoms improve.

So how do they do it? Low-carb eating is one major way. Dr Richard K. Bernstein discovered and promoted this approach in his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. Many others have followed. The British Web site Low Carb Diabetic asks, “Would you treat an alcoholic with more booze, or a drug addict with more heroin? Starchy carbs are poison to all diabetics.” The site’s authors (a mix of both Type 1s and Type 2s) claim they all have normal glucose numbers and that it wasn’t hard to accomplish.

Other diets have also enabled people to get off their diabetes medicines. Vegetarian diets and vegan diets — no meat, no eggs, no dairy, no honey — are known to help prevent diabetes. One two-year study of 25,000 people in the US and Canada, found that vegans had only one fourth the risk of developing diabetes as non-vegetarians.

Many people report their diabetes greatly improved or disappeared on a vegan diet. You can see some “success stories” here. One former police officer reports that his “A1c dropped from over 9 percent to 5.3 percent, his cholesterol dropped from 221 to 148 points, and he has lost 74 pounds” over a seven-year period.

You might notice that a vegan diet is about as far as you can get from a typical low-carb diet, which is often heavy in animal products. How could they both be effective against diabetes? Both approaches are very low in sugar and processed grains. Vegans eat a lot of carbs, but they’re typically vegetables, fruits, beans, and nuts, not breads and sugars.

Bariatric (“weight-loss”) surgery such as gastric bypass and gastric banding frequently put Type 2 diabetes “into remission.” The diabetes often stops within days, before any significant weight is lost.

How? We don’t know whether the remission is due to restructuring the intestinal plumbing. Could be, but a British study last year showed that a 600-calorie-a-day diet completely reversed Type 2 in less than two months. I was very skeptical about this finding, as I wrote here, because such a starvation diet cannot be maintained, and so diabetes returned in many of the subjects.

But I missed the point that people’s insulin sensitivity and signaling did improve in just a couple of weeks. It wasn’t just that their numbers came down, but that their bodies recovered normal function, at least temporarily. So perhaps a more sustainable diet could do the same thing over the long term.

That’s what Dr. Mark Hyman, author of the The Blood Sugar Solution believes. He writes that you don’t need an extreme diet. You don’t necessarily need weight loss and you don’t need surgery. He says that just cutting out (or way down) starches and sugars, and exercising more will reverse Type 2 diabetes in about 80% of people. (He says others may have nutritional deficiencies or fungal infections that require other treatment. But he claims they can get off diabetes medicines too, with proper help.)

Critics of the “reversal” idea say there have been few studies, and that it’s too early to tell if people’s reversal will reverse itself again. But nobody’s funding large studies. We have small ones, and we have hundreds of thousands of testimonials like the ones on our blog.

To me that’s a lot of evidence that eating well and exercising can greatly improve Type 2 diabetes, maybe even eliminate it in many cases. Does that sound believable to you? Do you have a story to share about getting better? Please share it. It’s time to get this epidemic under control.

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Comments
  1. I believe that modern medical science has completely over looked the glucose saturation of the skeletal muscle cells from constant overloading from diet plus excess liver leaks.

    The reason for the change is really understandable.

    Reduce the glucose generation from input by large amount and exercise - this gets the skeletal muscles off loaded from excess glucose so they have room to absorb more an now regulate BG. No room, no regulation.

    Once saturation removed, diet can be improved back up to 1200 to 1500 calories to energy balance.

    I have written to Dr. Roy Taylor at Newcastle University upon Tyne MRI center where they watched pancreas come back and report excellent results and reported at a ADA meeting that no one wanted to hear.

    The steep reduction in diet glucose generation needed to get saturation of skeletal muscles pulled back. Once done, then up diet to keep energy balance in check.

    Medical science is peddling a infinite energy glucose absorption machine -just shove in more glucose or ram in with actos when in fact glucose storage sites of the skeletal muscles are finite.

    It took me longer on 1200 calorie careful diet; but one week I was suddenly and unexpectedly after 30 years of pancreas shutdown; yanking starlix, 26 units of 75/25 insulin . In addition I was stringing more low doses - 500 mg of metformin over more of the clock.

    Today I use 1.5 units of humalog lispro at each meal and no more lantus.

    Posted by jim snell |
  2. I misspoke in enthusiasm:

    Medical science is peddling a infinite energy glucose absorption machine -just shove in more insulin or ram in with actos when in fact glucose storage sites of the skeletal muscles are finite.

    MRI studies have been done on this as well.

    Posted by jim snell |
  3. Well if veggan = no grains then I am all for it. I guess you can get enough calories from beans. Not sure about essential fatty acids and a complete set of proteins.

    I lost 85 lb down to skinny high school weight but it did not help the diabetes once I had to stop loosing weight I had to go on insulin. I was eating boiled rye mostly and lean ham for a bit more protein. I always wonder if a low carb or very low carb diet would have been much better. But that is NOT the dogma that was preached then or now.

    Insulin started a 10 year period of near constant weight gain. Presently trying victoza in addition to insulin. It has cut the insulin dose from 120 to less than 50 per day a near miracle. This makes weight loss possible.

    The present approach to treatment with more carbs and more insulin and drugs is falty.

    Posted by calgarydiabetic |
  4. Having decided to take my diabetes to war last year, with no medical advice. I followed a 600-700 daily calerie intake, protein, mass amounts of veg. Cooked with additional gravy for flavour. No conscious carbs except for things like gravy powder etc. within 7 days, I came off 50 (split into 25 x 2)dose of insulin. I now manage on metformin and Januvier alone. Coupled with 6-8 daily bike ride, 20 miles on Mondays. I lost 20 pounds.
    No big pat on the back. Anyone can do it if they focus.
    The point is maintaining this especially through winter. Most people find the warm cosy Gym an odd silicone existence.
    I confess that maintaining the strict calorie intake has now fallen by the way side, although just cutting bread out alone, leaves my blood sugar on the manageable side. Just not the amazing results I was getting last year. I’d be interested in any advice, or drug (safe) that could control the crave for carbs. Let’s face it. Most of us just find it pretty hard.

    Posted by Helen |
  5. Helen: Congratulations.

    Unbelievabley, ADA in their latest April 2012 statement; they recognize that the blood glucose level is a result of Liver glucose release and ingested carbs. On top of that Metformin’ sbasic role is to slow - reduce liver glucose relase.

    Well, here you are with data baking this up.
    Metformin, carbs control and hearty exercise.

    I do the same on 1200 calorie diet.

    Most of the clucking chickens totaly miss the point and get lost arguing that one cannot stay on 600 calorie diet.

    The fact is the tight diet, metformin and exercise get the glucose saturation stopped so that skeletal muscles get the glucose overload removed and have room to go back regulating.

    Then one can adjust diet back up and exercise down abit to the energy balance for ones body. The key is to keep the skeletal muscles from being overfilled up again. Insulin resistance is a standard operating feature of a distributed glucose storage system needed to prevent overfilling/overloading glucose sites on skeletal muscle cells and once whole body overloaded, insulin resistance as a whole appears turne don hard. That something ois broken and defective is inane stupidity.

    This T2 is fed up with this myoptic stonehenge view ignoring liver leaks, liver role and carbs control on an ancient Hunter gatherer gene/digestion system.

    Posted by jim snell |
  6. Hey Jim, you sound like you have great advice. I am a new diabetic and my mom is now on her death bed because of diabetes. She’s blind, she’s had a stroke and is now in the last stages of kidney failure. I have been pre-diabetic for a number of years and it finally hit me. Just seeing her like this REALLY hit home. I see what has happened and what can happen. Nothing can help her. She just had a heart attack and is not a candidate for a kidney transplant. Cant have dialysis because of the weak heart. My doctor has said that she and I have very similar blood chemistry….and it really scares me. SO..
    Now I am on a quest to really get it together and not be stupid or ignorant about it all like my mom was. I have been on the internet looking up all I can about this disease. The doc gave no real diet just metformin and cut out all white food products. Bread, potatoes,etc… Im looking up beans and fiber and if that is good. If your trying to cut the carbs, you would think beans and things like oatmeal would be way out of line. 40 or 50 carbs. I need some real help not just a fly by diet book of the month. I understand the fiber/slow absorption deal and actually really love all beans, just want to make sure I am doing all I can to reverse this. Ya know?
    Can you help or give some advise?
    thanks Mishelle

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  7. OH and how do you get the glucose saturation stopped??

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  8. I am from India, a Type-2 case. Being from other end of the globe, perhaps I can share some information which might be useful to some of you..

    a. In morning, take fenugreek seeds (1/2 tbsp) soaked in a cup of water overnight.. U shud take the water as well as chew the seeds in the morning empty stomatch. This helps. Look for Indian stores for these items else ping me if i can be of any help..

    b. There is one Jamun tree whose seeds and fruits are said to be good.

    c. Neem tree ( i don’t have seen this tree in US though) concentrate is good.

    d. Bitter guard is said to be helpful..

    e. Above all Yoga, Kapal-Bhati is specially good and certain other asanas are good..

    Above all good diet and exercise along with less stress will make things good..

    PLEASE NOTE I am not a doctor or a expert myself.. This is based on widespread recommendations in Ayurveda (ancient medical system of india based on herbs) etc.. IF you follow it surely eating these stuff won’t be harmful to anyone as they are just normal plants hundreds of millions of indians used in daily life..

    Keep Smiling this is also a very good medicine of its own :)

    Posted by Krishna |
  9. Krishna, thank you for information.
    I will look up these items to get more info on them. I have read about Ayurvedic medicine many years ago and found it very interesting. Not during my blood sugar event but will heed your advice. Hope ur doing well on the other side of the planet!!
    .Thank you!

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  10. Mishelle, try checking through this web site for other articles about keeping glucose down. It’s not rocket science — you mainly have to cut way, way down on starches and sugars, and move your body more.

    As Jim said, that will clear out the glucose-soaked, insulin-resistant muscle cells so they can go back to using glucose normally.

    But many other things, including the ones Krishna recommended, and vinegar, and other herbs can also help.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  11. My read on glucose saturation while hard to measure but really is:

    liver released glucose plus glucose from food less energy burned (process +exercise) should balance out at zero and not a steady overage of loose extra glucose.

    Unfortunately there is no orange/yellow alarm light on our dash. Usally weight loss is under balance - burn exceeds glucose generation. Weight gain and T2 is excess glucose not burnt being stored in the glucose sites of the skeletal muscles.

    As long as room in skeletal muscle glucose stirage sites, body can regulate blood stream by storing the excess.

    This is why hearty regular exercise is needed to keep the skeletal muscle sites off loaded.

    In a distrbuted system of muscles and storage sites, a system is needed to prevent cells being overloaded when full. Some cells not doing much and loaded up while others doing hearty exercise will neeed more glucose. This will be on selective basis. I have seen articles and research about the skeletal muscle cells have capability to downgrade the insulin sensors to reduce response to Blood stream insulin to prevent overloading and damaging those muscle cells already topped off due to too much glucose.

    I believe that insulin resistance is a natural body muscle cell response to control glucose absorption in a distributed system

    SOme believe that if too much glucose in body, it is merely absorbed as fat. I feel that is too simple a response as I believe both fat and muscle cells all have glucose storage sites that when loaded turn off insulin response. As more and more of body gets loaded with glucose, the insulin resistance climbs over all.

    As the hunter gatherer gene/digestion system has never seen a glucose molecule it wont absorb, it is critical for the human to manage energy input carefully to prevent glucose saturation.

    For me, I am on metformin doses to claw back the liver and a diet of 1200 calories and 1.5 to 2 miles walking and I lost weight down from 330 to 240 and seems stable now - 6 foot 2.

    Posted by jim snell |
  12. Dear David,
    As a healthcare provider you should be very careful with speculations without scientific measurement. It has been proven that diabetes is a disease of the pancreas (Beta cell distruction). Once your Beta cell is distroyed there is no regenaration. How then can we explain this scientific notation? We also know with lifestyle changes, meal planning, and exercise we can reduce the effect of diabetes. However, I do believe if we practice lifestyle modification before the activation of the Gene that causes diabetes we can prevent the unset of diabetes.
    Hope this help. I am 15 years old in 11th grade my mom is a diabetes educator. I help her with her work. I have learn many things from her. Hope this help.

    Posted by Marianna |
  13. I think that Jim Snell has presented an interesting analysis regarding glucose usage by fat and muscle cells that may explain an infrequent occurrence in my fasting numbers. Generally, my fasting reading is between 115-119, but after several weeks it may surge to 130 plus. I have come to believe that even if one keeps the blood sugar readings within the normal range before each meal, if excess carbs are consumed, even if apparently utilized, the body has a way of figuring this into an increased fasting reading the next morning.
    I have been thinking about this for a number of years and wondering what could cause this change in my usual pattern. With Mr. Snell’s suggestion I realize that there is a possibility that the fat and muscles have reached storage capacity causing insulin resistance to occur overnight , even if the before bedtime reading appears to be in the appropriate range. In short, monitoring carbs in the diet may require learning what one’s total capacity is, as opposed to monitoring before and after each meal, which may give readings in the normal range, but still may exceed the body’s daily tolerance for carbs.
    Thank you Mr. Snell for your input.

    Posted by Lynne Nelson |
  14. Thank you for your insight, Marianna. You seem a very intelligent and caring person. I don’t agree, though. Type 2 is more a disease of the liver than the pancreas. And even with substantial beta cell damage, partial or complete recovery is possible and frequently happens. I linked to some studies about this; it is measurable and well-documented.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  15. I know that white breads, cookies, starches, etc are bad for you.
    But I was told I need to balance my diet with whole wheat grains. (I am pre-diabetic). Isn’t this correct?

    Posted by Carol Graff |
  16. When I was diagnosed with type 2 almost 15 years ago, my A1C was 9.3. I weighed 250 pounds - and on my short 5′2″ frame that was quite a load! It’s taken all this time, and I still have another 60 pounds to lose - but my A1C is down to 6.6 now. I’m working hard!!!!!!! My diet is nothing like it used to be! I eat fresh fruits and veggies and stay completely away from boxed and canned and processed foods. IT MOST CERTAINLY CAN BE REVERSED!!!!!! I’m still on meds and yes, insulin (10U a day) - but… I believe with all my heart that if I can take off just 20 more pounds I can eliminate the need for the insulin - and perhaps even the oral meds. I have started blogging my journey - it’s part of my “therapy” - lol!!!!! I would LOVE to have people visit me and read about my journey! I’m here to help and encourage every way I possibly can! http://fromonediabetictoanother.blogspot.com/
    Hope to hear from other diabetics there! Thanks!

    Posted by Linda Lou Turner-Palmer |
  17. David,
    Wow! I hope full recovery is really possible!. Just came back from visiting my mom (this is Mishelle from a few comments earlier) and it is horrible what this disease is doing to her. Her heart now has fluid around it and she cant breath. Quick short breaths and its hard to watch. She will be gone within the week and Im just beside myself. Soooo tough.
    Anyhow, I have been watching my blood levels/ at fasting (which in the morning is usually 110 to 123ish) still too high. When I eat breakfast or any meal it seems the 1st hour my level can go above 150 or 160 (without carbs.just meat and veggies) The second hour it will go back under 120. I have done so much research on diabetes and from what I hear ( 5% club and AMA etc.. that so much has been focused on fasting blood sugar when the 2nd hour level is really the most important. That if blood sugar is over 150 the 2ND HOUR that is when most of the damage is done. So now the 150 mark is making me neurotic LOL!! It seems that my issue is the
    1st hour. One morning I had 1/4 cup oat meal with (no sugar) cut up 1/2 small apple and my blood sugar went to 202! I cant take even oatmeal. So I have no breakfast just coffee and cream. I eat advocados with sometimes walnuts and veggies. Meat or chicken. Have cut out all bread, potatoes..no starchy carbs. All I do is watch my numbers. At nite some times I have sugar free jello with sugar free whipped cream. I take 2 metformin 500mg and my fasting BS in the morning is 123?? Still too high. I am up on my feet all day where I work and my feet kill me! The thought of walking or Jogging does not appeal to me. But I like to exercise and come from an active background (singer dancer/ aerialist) Just have to find something that doesnt hurt my feet.
    If anyone can give me info as to why my 1st hour is so high I would love it. I am still learning so much an so appreciate people like all of you… David Spero and Jim, thank you so much.

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  18. Just to give more info, I am 5′2 and weigh 154. I hope just trying to get my numbers under control will bring down the weight. Im not crazy heavy but defiantly can lose about 30 lbs. Maybe if I can do that, things will change for the better. ;-) thanks Mishelle

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  19. I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in December of 2011. It was a shock for me, but why not, I have so many other health issues anyway. I was told that my fibromyalgia was making my diabetes worse. Well, I also have sjorgens, asthma, colitis, and a High anxiety disorder among other things too numerous to mention.
    I have tried all these wheat products and they make me so sick. They just don’t agree with my body.
    My family doctor suggested years ago for me to try Ezekiel Bread. I did and I just loved it, it was so tasty but, it bloated me up so badly that I couldn’t walk around. I told my doctor about it and he said to try 1/2 piece, I did and the same problem. I try not to eat white bread, I eat pumpernickel bread and rye bread. It seems to work out quite well for me.
    Fortunately for me, I love vegetables and fruit and can make a meal on them, but I also need meat so I stick to chicken, salmon, hamburger, pork chops(on occasion) and turkey sausage. I also find that 1/2 hour after I have eaten a meal I am still hungry and I usually eat a small bowl of Kashi shredded wheat that is quite good and very filling. I do drink coffee and I have read that that is supposed to be good for you and can even help you to lose weight.
    I am one of those weird humans that everything seems to work backwards. My doctors have always had to bring out their drug book to see just what medication I might be able to take. I even have problems with the natural vitamins, herbs, and spices. I figure that I will just have to experiment with foods to see just what will work for me. I have had to do that very thing for my fibromyalgia. It is a challenge but, I figure that it will be worth it all when I finally get the pieces of the medical puzzle put together.
    Thanks for the info that you did provide. Every little bit sure does help.

    Posted by Francie |
  20. I had gastric bypass surgery to possibly rid myself of diabetes. For several years just ate lots of protein and veggies, couldn’t tolerate carbs at all, lost 100 pounds. My diabetes did not improve, A1C’s never dropping below 8. Now that I am able to eat more normally, the only thing that has even minimally helped has been Victoza in addition to my regular and Lantus insulin. Nothing works for everyone.

    Posted by Pat Weiser |
  21. The University of Newcastle upon Tyne’s MRI center doing mri spectography on pancreas of T2’s who of varing age and number of years as T2 and watched the pancreas come alive and see insulin generation where previously had given up the ghost.

    Dr. Taylor shared that after the release of their study and reports in England, many folks from all over had written in to advise of most promising results doing the extreme 600/reduced calorie diet and increased hearty exercise.

    my point is that there is most curious data and results from this aspect of bariatric surgery, lap band, intestine liner and staravation diets of T2 field that really needs a serious look into. Given T2 current numbers, not much else is showing curious results in the field of T2 work.

    David: Thank you for sharing your knowledge, experience and data.

    Posted by jim snell |
  22. Lynne Nelson : thank you for your wondering about insulin resistance and speed of it appearing/disappearing.

    So far on my 4 years experience fighting my liver wanting to make me a marachino cherry; I repeatedly noticed that insulin resistance was max in am after the dawn effect ahmmering of my body up to 235.

    At that time 26 units of 75/25 injected seemed like injecting the stuff into a dead post.

    I even increased a small amount as a test to see any reaction. Nope - just like water.

    After I walked my body 6 - 1/4 mile loops; I would see the Blood BG start to come down to 180.

    After the last 2 - 1/4 miles, this would excellerate and drop to 100 fast as body started to pay attention to insulin.

    Once at 100 to 120; insulin and glucose actions bcame fully sensitized again.

    My read still is that as the skeletal muscle cells get their glucose stores shifted down and make more room, these cells upgrade their insulin receptor sites back up to full sensitivity to begin accepting more glucose. This is why I believe insulin resistance is a normal cell reaction and necessary in a distributed glucose in the muscle sites.

    The body was done this way so that the human was always hot to trot immediatly should the saber tooth tiger come sneaking around the corner looking for a quick snack.

    Posted by jim snell |
  23. Looking at the comments, it seems to me that there are more than just 2 types of diabetes. Obviously type I is permanent but type II seems to have so many variables that I would hesitate to lump it into one condition. Both my grandmother and mom died from complications of diabetes. I was prediabetic for years and at 58 they wanted me to start on meds.

    I hsve steadfastly refused meds for mine. At 300 lbs with physical disabilties that make walking difficult, exercise is not the option I would like it to be. I could never get my morning fast levels under 120.

    I also have a nonspecific vasculitis threatening my kidneys. In my quest to get that under control I read that too many calories at any one time will cause an inflamation reaction. So I have embarked on an eating regime that allows 300-400 calories at any one time while eating every 3-4 hrs. I haven’t had my A1C checked yet but my morning fast is consitently under 100. It has not had the effect on the vasculitis that I had hoped for but I am delighted with the blood sugar levels.

    I am hoping to get an exercise bike to see if it will help with the weight loss and will continue my quest against the vasculitis. I cannot take the steroids like some people due to my reaction to them but surely something will work. In the mean time the type II is under control.

    I know thinner people who eat better and exercise yet must take insulin and still can’t get morning fasts under 100. Consequently, I believe that there are more than two variations of this disease. It is probably not quite that simple.

    Posted by Cheri Lundstrom |
  24. Friends and Docs, I cannot take Metformin! Therefore I had to go on insulin. Any suggestions for me besides low to no carbs and excersice? My glucose levels have increased appreciably since I had a kidney stone too, any correlation?

    thanks, Marilyn

    Posted by marilyn |
  25. This all proves that diabetes is more than a blood sugar problem, or a problem of cardiovascular risk factors. It’s a problem of how we live, how we eat and what we eat. If you can reverse ‘back’ to nutrition with lower glycemic index, less processed sugars of starches, no fast food, start cooking fresh meals with all the recommended ingredients, and exercise regularly you will inevitably see that diabetes improves or reverses. Problem is to keep it up longterm, and not give in into the temptations of modern industry… Then there is the issue of etiology of diabetes, and there are sufficient opinions, among others infection, emotional stress, self-loathing etc etc. So, look beyond medicine with tablets and insuline (but don’t neglect it…), look at your life and start thinking!

    Posted by Volker |
  26. excellent thoughts and comments. Thank you Volker.
    Dead on target!

    Posted by jim snell |
  27. Michelle, I’m sorry about your mother’s suffering. I hope she is released soon.

    It’s good that you are paying good attention to your numbers, but don’t make yourself crazy with it. You have time to get this under control; your numbers aren’t that awful.

    If you can’t/don’t want to walk, consider biking, swimming, seated exercise…there are many ways to move. You can find some ideas on our site.

    I will reply to more comments later. Thanks to everyone who has commented.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  28. To Carol, who was told she needed whole grains — that’s the advice that has made ADA very unpopular in some circles. Try doing without grains for a week and see what happens. You will need to eat more vegetables, and beans would be a very good addition.

    Linda Lou — keep it up! I will check out your blog.

    Pat W, if stopping carbs and losing weight and eating veggies didn’t touch your A1C, I’m at a loss. You’re unusual. Please don’t stop looking, though. If you haven’t tried vinegar yet, start there.

    Cheri, the exercise bike is a good idea. You will need some way to make it entertaining, though. Music or TV while riding are good ways to keep you going.

    Marilyn, your kidney stone could be increasing your sugars through inflammation and stress. I hope that is resolved soon. Would recommend vinegar before meals and possibly at bedtime for you, too, if you haven’t tried it.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  29. Hey David and thank you,

    My mother passed today and it was hard. My sons were here beside me and were wonderful. This is something I will NOT go through. I feel like the last 3 years has been trying to motivate her and make her healthier, all the while I was getting worse. All though my numbers are not horrendous, I do have a goal… and that is not to get them over 150 if possible. I know we all have our moments of crazy eating but that is the goal. There are still low carb treats out there that can keep us on the right path. I have lost 3lbs by eating low carb and I will keep on it. I will. No longer is this weightloss for me. It is my life. I never looked at it like this before but this is how I see it now. This is one good thing that came out of her death. Is my life. And what I can do about now to make it better. Otherwise, its all in vein.

    Posted by Mishelle Whitmire |
  30. Great information from David, Jim and all the others.

    Mishelle, so sorry about your mother. But don’t let it make you paranoid about yourself. You are completely on the right track to take care of your own health by getting good information. You’ll find some things on this blog to help you alot.

    Linda Lou, I checked out your blog and it is great! Love the Award you gave to Cracker Barrel–one of my fav restaurant. Wish all others would take this info seriously and use it to give us all healthy places to eat out.

    Well, David, you are really popular. More responses here than I’ve seen. Looks like there’s a lot of diabetics hunting good information. Keep up the good work.

    Posted by Linda Martin |
  31. Hi David, I am T2 for 20 years(A1C usually 6.2-6.8. Last November I weighed 288 with A1C=7.1 and diabetic complications had set in. Today after hundreds of hours of reading from different sources and a very low carbohydrate diet, my A1C is 5.6! I have subsequently lost 35 lbs so far. My target weight is around 170-180 with and a target A1C of 4.5. If it takes a year, I can wait. My sugars are now under control and all my symptoms are gone! Now that’s Reversal! I can be confident, that if I keep my blood sugars the same as a non diabetic, non obese person, I will not have any diabetic complications ever. I can thank Dr Bernstein’s book for my clarity. So Can Type II be reversed? For me yes. I have an A1c goal. Supporting that goal is a treatment plan whose low Carb diet sets blood sugars in a very narrow range along with medication and exercise and I monitor as many as 5 to 6 times a day. For everyone else with Type II in this country, I would love to say that you can do this as well!

    Posted by DennisW |
  32. I was going through a bad time with newly diagnosed Fibromyalgia ten years ago. At that time, I could not walk and eventually started having blood sugar issues. I was diagnosed with no blood tests and given serious diabetic medication right off which made me feel like I would be better off dead. I immediately changed my diet to a low carb diet with meals of organic eggs, organic meat and poultry and wild caught fish, organic low glycemic vegetables and a little fruit, nuts, seeds and limited organic dairy. I included good fats but did not cut out fat. My blood sugar returned to normal in one week and was dropping too low on the drug so I called a nurse hotline for help and she suggested that I take some glucose tablets to raise my blood sugar. At that point I just stopped my medication and said no to the glucose tablets. My blood sugar never went back up but continued to remain in the normal range of 70s and 80s.
    I also made sure to ride a bike every day. I slowly made my way back to walking which took about 4 years. Today, my blood sugar levels remain normal and all my blood work is great. I am, in fact, doing top level Zumba and am in better shape than I was when I was younger. It can be done and it actually, can be done quite easily. You will have to give up the center aisles of the supermarket and all the fast food joints and be super selective at better restaurants and in fact limit your visits to restaurants and you will never be able to lounge on a sofa popping bonbons but you will also not have to be a prisoner to drugs and symptoms and worry over a future consumed by illness and clueless doctors more than willing to send you over the cliff with their outdated ideas and their drive to push damaging medications on you.

    Posted by Anna |
  33. I want to know whether using gluten-free pasta can silently help my father-in-law’s Type II diabetes. I know he needs to make a lot of changes, but I’m trying to poke around while I am helping his wife, my mother-in-law, recuperate from surgery. I will be cooking for them for about a month and want to help in any small way I can.

    Posted by Pattie Newgent |
  34. Pattie,

    To me gluten-free pasta is still pasta and won’t make much of a difference, UNLESS your father-in-law has some gluten intolerance. He might, and could be checked for it. Maybe Amy Campbell or some of our readers know more about the effect of gluten-free foods.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  35. One step at a time, one day at a time. The key to success is having acheivable goals. Lifestyle changes become lifestyle. Check out awakeningtohealth.org The Integrative Medical Clinic of Santa Rosa has created an individualized program of living well with Diabetes. A skilled team of various modalities to help create a winning health plan for you. Very cool!

    Posted by Amy Schiff, L.Ac. |
  36. I was newly diagnosed in Feb of this year. My A1C was 10.5 I was put on Metformin and Glipizide luckily I was .5% away from having to take insulin. It has been 6 months and with a complete lifestyle change which included a low carb diet and daily excersise I was just taken off ALL of my meds and my latest A1C results are a 5.8. I truly believe with dedication to changing your eating habits and your lifestyle that it clearly can be reversed. The key for me was understanding it was not going on a “diet” because the changes are for LIFE….. I am happy and healthy. Not only are my A1C’s in line my cholesterol - triglicerides my blood pressure my kidney and liver functions are all normal! : )

    Posted by Teresa |
  37. Congratulations Teresa.

    Your experiences seem to support the fact that as one gets back to energy balance managing carbs consumption, and adding regular energy burn; it is possible to stop the rot and run body in a better operating range arresting the type 2.

    The hunter gatherer body/gene/digestion system does not manage excess energy consumption /lack of calorie burn in body. Its focus is to prevent starvation and grab all excess energy in case of brown out.

    The human in restrospect needs to manage the input cycle and energy burn to prevent constant excess energy/glucose left over in body ( diabetes T2).

    I agree with your comments and wish you best of good health and success.

    My own success and your comments suggest to me it is possible to stop/reverse the nasty type 2 process.

    Posted by jim snell |
  38. David:

    I believe that there is a small missed point about these super tight diets.

    My read is that if you are full type2 and have been for a while, ones body muscles get saturated with glucose.

    From my persepctive the super tight diet is not needed for long term - only as long as necessary to get the levels of glucose saturation in the temporary glucose storage of the skeletal muscles dropped. Once that is done and insulin control returns and insulin resistance goes down; one can return to a larger diet calorie amount consistent of not gaining weight.

    For pre-diabetes I would assume that simple diet control and small reductions with increase exercise ( modet)may all be that is necessary.

    My read was that it took me 6 months on a 1200 calorie/2miles walking and liver restrained under metformin to wring out the excess glucose in my body. I know this from watching blood glucose numbers go sub 70 and watch no dump from liver - clearly showing excess glucose lurking around my body and brain. ” we are going low - Brain obviously didn’t care”

    Today, reliably each time BG drops sub 70 brain and liver jump into action to do dump.

    So in summary; tight diets are more of a temporary de-saturation tactic.

    I was surprised to learn that people on RouY gastric bypass start out at 600 calories after surgery and then gradually increased. Even after the increase, calorie input must be carefully monitored adn controlled or the good effects of the surgery disappear and one is back to same ole problem.

    Posted by jim snell |
  39. Thank you, Jim, for sharing the details of your story, which explains a lot about what is happening for many people. I wish we could get you written up as a case study for some journal.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  40. David:

    Many special thanks for all your works and writing that for me have been great emotional support and assistance working thru this mess that simply put takes consistency, tight discipline and worst off - lots of time.

    Regarding your comments; I would be pleased to work/share with you any details and help any way I can, with info that could assist in putting together a case study or some follow on report to help others. Please advise how I can help!

    My only goal is to help others and share the message that it is super critical to get these issues worked out and if no immediate answer, one needs to keep searching and not give up nor pray it will simply go away and do nothing.

    Not a chance, or you will end up walking my path, stroke, etc. It really is critical to follow great web sites like Diabetes Self-Management and their excellent bloggers such as your self, Jan Chait, Dianne Fennell and the full team learning as much as possible from them.

    Diabetes is such a stinker of a problem that simply going to Doctor and dumping in his hands and hoping all will be fixed is not possible today and unfair to Doctor and ones self.

    Best wishes and prayers for good health ( at least under control).

    Posted by jim snell |
  41. I missed to mention the excellent work and blogs by Amy Campbell on food and diets - a most important/critical aspect as well and any body else I missed.

    Posted by jim snell |
  42. I have been a type 2 since 2004. i have lost nearlly 4o kilos in that time and am on medication it still has not made a difference to my readings. which is so frustrating. my mother has type2 and my brother had it as well he passed away two years ago/ . i beleive that it affects every ones body different and what works for one doesnt work for all. which is why we have such different out comes from the same advice. which makes it harder to combat. its a horrid illness to have. i hate it with passion, you can do all the right things and it still not be right. for your sugar levels.

    Posted by caroline davis |
  43. Caroline: Thank you for sharing.

    I agree and have following comment:

    Many times the underlying control really is straighforward but what hamstrings the understanding is all the extra intermediate waltzing and steps needed by body to control and manage all the external events, issues and chemistry and other oddities such that once that done ; then the real control can begin.

    I was involved in complec digital electronics , design and battle fixing such stuff and what stood out was:

    a) actual control at lowest level could be starightforward and simple.

    b) if the design failed to protect itself against all the other real world bumps and issues, the simple design would be trashed for failing to protect against all the extra waltzing and spurious events and what seem as trivial issues (NOT).

    I believe the body is like that and when on full manual - T2 diabetes, one ends up learning all the other waltzing and dancing ones body is doing to manage all the other non obvious events an dissues that must be managed to allow the sugar control systems to work properly as well.

    Bumps and dips in glucose production from gut, disease and intestional pests, variability of the food and energy content, leakage and age - etc.
    These events were all invisibly managed as the buffers and working automatic control systems of the body hid these processes and paved over the holes, bumps, etc.

    Training in T2 diabetes management seem from my perspective like to simplfy and hide the complexities from the patient and thusly tie hands of patient and allows tough surpises to show up unannounced and make the whole process seem random, illogical and uncontrollable.

    That messes up a person emotionally and their lives with the normal folks - who are well.

    Best wishes and good luck on your health.

    Posted by jim snell |
  44. I’ve gone from being T2 diabetic to pre-diabetic. I exercise as best I can, given advanced osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, some kind of disorder that generates too much bone, and spine/disc problems. I eat a vegetarian diet but include dairy products and eggs. I eat walnuts and almonds every day, along with home-made muesli and yogurt, bean/brown rice soup with lots of greens and other veggies. My most recent A1c was 5.9. I try to do everything right for my health. My doctor says that I will eventually need to be on meds. I find that very discouraging. What can I do differently to better my chances of not going into remission? I have episodes of low blood sugar where I sweat and shake, so I eat every 3-4 hours to try to keep my blood sugar stable. I don’t think that I could do a low-calorie diet.

    Posted by Callie Reed |
  45. Callie, if you’ve “gone from Type 2 to pre-diabetic” it seems you are moving in the right direction. I don’t see why the doctor says you will need to be on meds. Your diet sounds great. Have you considered water exercise?

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  46. I have a recumbent exercycle that I use almost daily. The only times I don’t use it are during fibromyalgia flares and I need to conserve my energy to simply get through the day. I also am able to walk some for exercise. Many years ago, I attended a water exercise class for people with arthritis and have been thinking about doing so again.

    I appreciate your words of encouragement. I need to read and study the explanation about muscles and glucose so that I can fully understand it and then try to implement it as much as I can. I’m grateful that I stumbled across this blog.

    Callie

    Posted by Callie Reed |
  47. I’m a 55 year old male that got very overweight in my 40’s to 275 lbs and a height of 5′10″.

    I did a 1 1/2 year veg and caloric reduction diet strategy of eating 1/2 portions at meals, reducing carbs and sweets, vegetarian meals with lots of fruit, vegetables, and nuts. Stopped drinking sodas and drank ultra chilled ice water, lemon juice, and grapefruit juice. For exercise I walked 1 to 2 miles every day and did lots of step climbing.

    I successfully went from 275 lbs down to a slim and trim 155 lbs (my high school weight range). Normal weight for my height is about 175 lbs, so I wanted to have 20 lbs below that to have a cushion zone for when I would begin insulin which I’d read could cause weight gain. The doctor did say 155 lbs was too skinny though and the 160’s would look better which I agreed with and went to.

    My Diabetes treatment timing strategy of course was risky because I made the decision to get my weight under control before being treated for T2 Diabetes. When I was heavy my glucose levels were in the 300 mg/dl to 450 range. I also had started to develop neuropathy (numbness and extreme nerve pains) in my feet and calves back in February (and at that time not even having heard of the condition neuropathy or knowing the hell like pain and mobility debilitation it was about to do to me).

    I went on Metformin (1000 mg) and Insulin (24 units) in March and my body responded remarkably quickly, just 30 days to get down to the 100 mg/dl to 120 range.

    I stopped Metformin after 60 days as I found it was worsening the neuropathy as were some statins the doctor had recommended to improve my cholesterol. My glucose levels stayed stabilized without the Metformin. This gave me hope that I would be able to eventually reverse my Diabetes.

    After 7 months I had been able to reduce my Insulin to 10 units daily and I decided to see what would happen if I stopped the Insulin completely.

    To my surprise, my neuropathy immediately started to improve with a significant reduction in the numbness and a dramatic reduction in the frequency and intensity of the nerve pains. Even more fascinating my glucose levels are down in the 90’s now. (I recently read that sometimes the medications for Diabetes can worsen your neuropathy and now think that is the case for me.)

    I also found a remarkable supplement Acetyl L-Carnitine (1000 mg daily) that helped the neuropathy tremendously. (There isn’t an immediate specific medicine fix for neuropathy just lots of non-specific treatments designed for other illness conditions that some physicians believe help neuropathy.)

    I tried many things, and the Acetyl is the only one that worked. So if you have developed neuropathy don’t give up hope because doctors will tell you there is no cure even if you reverse your Diabetes, and that it can take up to 1 to 3 years and sometimes longer for the numbness to fade and the nerves to regenerate. Neuropathy has been the most painful experience in my entire life. It’s non-stop shooting and constant hellacious pains of every type imaginable. It’s caused by having high blood sugar for years and it disinegrates the sheathing on the nerves and basically causes them to short circuit and misfire. It debilitates your ability to walk normally and you feel like you’re walking on broken glass with every step. The nerve pain is indescribable brutal and like prisoner of war style torture. You can’t even sleep at night when the pain gets even more intense and your feet feel so numb like they’re in blocks of ice. Very few obese people even know about this horrendous Diabetes complication. There really needs to be more education in this respect so people understand how Diabetes can really make your life filled with non-stop pain.

    So YES you can reverse Diabetes with Insulin and then by getting your weight under control to normal range with healthy eating, watching your caloric intake, vegetarian meals, moderate daily exercise, and discipline to resist all the unhealthy crap foods that have made half the population so overweight.

    Give yourself time to accomplish your health and weight goals. You can’t get skinny overnight. I tried many diets before I came up with my own system that worked so incredibly well for me. I’m now at a stable 165 lbs!

    Kev

    Posted by Kev |
  48. hello everybody i have found these posts most helpful i now realise after 10 years of diabetes i am at war with diabetes i thank everybody for there useful advice
    cheers paul

    Posted by paul |
  49. Yes, one is at war.

    Can you get off meds - that is very complex question and not easily answered.

    My take is this:

    Meforming for liver - I see no improvement declining needs for meds for the excess glucose production of liver.

    Take meds properly, issue is under control. Stop meds - back in ones face immediately. ( metformin)

    Insulin, glucose control, why yes, there has been incredible improvements and dropping /reduction of meds - insulin, actos, glyburide, starlix as diet, eating, exercise and better control take control.

    So as soon as modern medical scienec gets off the vampire/black magic cures, silver bullets, wood stake in heart, garlic necklesses and accepts the complexity of issue and need for a weave of complex answers, the better we will all be off.

    Posted by jim snell |
  50. Hi everyone,
    Just found out my fasting BG was 105…5 years ago it was 90 and 10 years ago was 80. My dad had diabetes. I too had mild gestational diabetes before my son was born 12 years ago (controlled with diet alone) but BG dropped to normal after he was born.
    My doc says that “in all probability” I will become a diabetic in a few years and the only thing I can do is to delay it by a few years. Is he right?
    I am a vegan, height 5′ 7″, 153lbs. I exercise 5 days a week for an hour (45 min cardio, 15 min weights) and burn an average of 450 calories a day. My diet mostly consists of whole grains, veggies, fruits, milk and yogurt though I do succumb to temptation once a week and stuff myself with a brownie or a cookie. Is there any way I can reduce my BG and avoid getting diabetes? I’m trying to lose some weight now so that I can get down to 135lbs. Will that help? I greatly appreciate any advice!

    Posted by Rhea |
  51. Hi Rhea,

    If you are as athletic and vegan as you describe, you are an unlikely Type 2. Quite possibly you are not producing enough insulin, as in LADA or MODY, which you can find out about by searching this site.

    However, what to do about it is another question. Perhaps readers have some ideas. I would consider starting out with vinegar before meals or at bedtime &mdsah; read our articles on vinegar first.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  52. Thank you, David! I read the articles on vinegar, LADA and MODY…eye-openers, I must say. I’ll get started on vinegar right away. I’m supposed to go back for a Glucose Tolerence Test in 2 months. Hopefully the vinegar plus some weight loss will reward me with positive results.

    Posted by Rhea |
  53. Here again; while you are trying some of the suggested helpful tactics, I would be checking with Doctor and Lab tests to ensure there are no medical misfires that are part of the issue requiring medical fixes as well.

    Posted by jim snell |
  54. Rhea,

    Make sure you check out some of the comments on the vinegar thread about protecting your teeth by rinsing and/or brushing after vinegar. Jim’s advice is also good — at least ask your doctor about LADA and MODY.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  55. after 2 weeks sensible eating i have cut my insulin by 20% the war has started good luck everyone

    Posted by paul |
  56. Help! I have just been diagnosed with T2. I am having a terrible time getting my blood sugar down in the mornings. My average is about 145. Today my doctor increased my metformin to 4 times a day. Diet? Such an awful word. Any suggestions of what’s a really good diet that works? I need to loose 40 pounds and for me that might as well be a 100.

    I have been really depressed and reading all your comments is encouraging.

    Thanks a bunch ! Carla

    Posted by Carla Anne |
  57. Don’t panic, Carla. You can do this, and you probably don’t need to lose weight — try looking at one of the books I mentioned in the blog. In various ways, they all agree — replace most starches and sugars with protein/fruits/nuts/vegetables/oils.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  58. hello after nearly 4 weeks the insulin is down by 30% is there any links to why we need vinegar cheers paul

    Posted by paul |
  59. hie im vivian and i was diagnosed with diabetes jan 2012 and i get so scared sometimes i am overweight but i am losing the weight but its coming off slowly i am trying to eat right but it is so hard i just cry and i blame myself for this curse that has fell on me i pray that i get better with this thing lord i prayso hard for a better me i am on the metformin now but i get so sick when i take them do anyone know what i can do to take the sick feeling away that always messes my days up please tell me .

    Posted by vb |
  60. Vivian, read the comments section of the blog entry I wrote on metformin to get some ideas how to deal with the side effects. If they don’t work, tell your doctor you need to be on a different medicine.

    Stop blaming yourself and stop focusing on weight. Read some of the articles we’ve had recently on reversing Type 2 diabetes to get some ideas for a food plan you can live with.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  61. I followed the advice of the diabetic dieticians. I ate from the list of foods I was given and I counted every gram of carb. Over the course of two years doing so, I became very sick and was told I would have to go on increasing amounts of medication, including insulin. January of 2012, one year ago, my A1c was 8.7, I felt horrible. I decided to adopt a grain free lifestyle and read everything I could find on “Paleo” eating. In three months my A1c dropped to 6.0. I eat all day and am satiated. There are many cookbooks now, and no suffering or craving at all. Energy back, no more fatigue and feel like I have my life back. BP is 102/76, blood fat good, glucose excellent. Had I continued to follow the advice I was given, especially to continue to eat grain I think I may have died. In my opinion the diet advice I was given was dangerous to me.

    Posted by Beverly |
  62. Very interesting feedback from Beverly:

    Drop grain and go on Paleo diet. My goodness - eat the foods the Hunter gaterer gene digestion system were optimized over time for,

    Great feedback!

    Posted by jim snell |
  63. I HAVE TY2 DIABETES , JUST DIAGNOSED. THIS HAPPEN IN DECEMBER 1ST WK. I IMMEDIATELY WAS GIVEN METFORMIN, I JUST HATE USING IT. SO AS A VEGETARIAN AND VERY GOOD IN CONTROLLING WHAT EAT, I STOPPED THE PILL ATER TWO DAYS AND STICK WITH MY VEGETARIAN DIET OF BEANS/PEAS/BROCCLI/CAULIFL/16BEANS SOUP/GREEN LEAF VEGETABLES SALAD. NOW MY BL SU IS COMPLETELY UNDER CONTROL WITH NO MEDS.
    I AM MUCH HEALTHIER NOW THAN EVER AND AM NOT GOING BACK TO MAN MADE FOODS LIKE COFEE, BAGELS
    DOUGHNUTS, SODAS, WHITE FLOUR PRODUCTS ,WHITE RICE
    ETC . ONLY FOODS THAT ARE FROM THE LAND.

    BRAM

    Posted by ray |
  64. Hi everyone,

    So glad to read everyones comments. I was told 2 yrs ago about pre diabetes and didtn take it serious. I had surgeries to lower back and was in serious walking pain. I wsnt eating good and as many was on the junk food band wagon..soads and high carb foods. This yr was was alarmed and went to ER for hea dizziness after drink a glass of apple juice. To my surprise my a1c was 10.5 and at the time my sugar levels over 300. I was given insulin shots that day and given metformin twice a day. I am quite familier with type II from my moms complications who died from it. Never understood it or the process but Im sure the meds is what killed her. I did some research on suppliments, its been 2months since ive been taking tumeric, golden seal, cinnamon, vitamin d, and potassuim. After close monitoring it looks like my sugar levels are down from a morning of 170-180 to 105-110 wih out the use of metformin. I have the lap band but not restricted yet. I weigh 300lbs and adjusted my eating to no sugars, pasta, milk and any of the other things mentioned. I do however eat lots of almonds, mexican pico with chips which is cilantro,onions, tomatos, hot peppers and lime juice. Its mt way of eating fresh veggies daily. I still eat meat but cooked with olive oil. NO SODAS! tried coke zero. I’ll add this, there is no room for metformin here. Im own testing with these suppliments shows tumeric to drop my sugars 20 plus in 30mins, however it does gradually rise back but the addition of cinnamon and golden seal seem to have lowered an kept the level steady at around the numbers of 105-115 in the morning. Like I said i dont take metformin because like someone here metionned it gave side effects cramping in my legs and skin bruises showed up from wearing my belt an leaned over or sitting. I do believe i have revereses type II in me but I still have a long way to go in loosing weight and becoming healthier. Summary, I believe my body was taking in to much sugar than what it could handle and shut down. The eye doctor examination reported to me no damage visible in eyes so that was a plus and hope i am still in the early stages of my problem and have hope it will remove its self by going back to good health eating and not following the band wagon for boxed high fructose everything that is put in just about everything you pick at the local “WAl” mrt sotres.
    All I know is that my body is responding quickly to theses suppliments and i havent even began to loose any weight yet. Being over weight is a problem to many but loosing weight the unhealthy way isnt the answer to curing type II either.

    Posted by Paul H. |
  65. I regards to my previous post about taking supplements & lap band journey/ progress instead of meds I could start a blog if anyone is interested.

    Posted by Paul H. |
  66. Hi Paul,

    It sounds like you are doing very well, so keep it up. You might shoot to bring the morning numbers down even farther — you’re still in the prediabetic range. Based on what our readers are posting, some vinegar at bedtime might help — and staying off the artificial foods like you’re doing.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  67. My husband was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes four months ago. At that time he was diagnosed, he had a blood glucose reading of 370. Doctor put him on Metforim - 1,000 mg a day which brought his blood glucose down to the low 200’s. So the doctor upped his meds to 2,000 mg a day which brought his blood glucose reading down to normal range.

    Someone mentioned that drinking bitter melon tea works on lowering blood glucose so we bought some to try. It’s bery inexpensive. Only $4 a box for 50 tea bags from an Asian grocery store.

    The first day of trying the tea, my husband took 1,000 mg of Metforim in the morning, skipped his evening dose and drank one cup of tea. Next morning BG was 80. He skipped his Metforim the following day and just drank cup of tea in the morning and one cup of tea in the evening. Next morning blood glucose was 90 something. It’s been three weeks now without taking any Metforim and fasting glucose in morning has been under 100 except for two of the days it was around 114 due to one of those days consuming pizza for dinner and the other day consuming cookies in the evening.

    I tried the tea also as bitter melon tea has many other health benefits. First I was afraid it would taste bitter. We sweeten our tea with Agave and the tea doesn’t taste bad at all.

    My husband is so happy to not have to take his Metforim any more. He did try drinking apple cider vinegar in the beginning but that his hard to swallow and doesn’t come close to producing the results that bitter melon tea does and the results were immediate.

    Posted by Debbie |
  68. Hey Debbie,

    Thanks for sharing this story of your husband and bitter melon. I have written about that herb here, but most of the studies hadn’t shown such a strong response. Glad it’s working for your husband — good for you for researching and trying new things.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  69. David,

    I am in agreement with you that any use of herbal remedies should be used with caution although it’s worth a try.

    Alot of info on the internet suggests eating bitter melon but problem with that is that is tastes awful as a cooked dish and takes preparation to make. They also sell bitter melon capsules but these are very expensive. The tea is the most convenient and least inexpensive.

    It may not work as well for others but I can see it definitely works for my husband. He had BG readings in the morning so far this week of 86, 83, 80, 94, 88 and 94.

    He said he rather drink two cups of tea each day instead of 2,000 mg of Metforim.

    I checked the box of tea for ingredients and there is nothing else in the tea except for 100% dried bitter melon.

    Posted by Debbie |
  70. David:
    This was so helpful! Thanks for posting. I am prediabetic with fasting blood glucose ranging from 95-125. My post pranials are always good and I could not figure out what the heck was going on. I tried paleo, vegan, vegetarian diets and still had the same outcomes. I need to lose about 50 lbs. and am pulling my hair out because I cannot figure it out! Still don’t know what or how to eat, but the idea that I have saturation of glucose resonates with me. Do you have any suggestions on an eating plan to follow?
    Thanks.

    Posted by Michele |
  71. Hi Everyone,

    Wanted to also mention that in conjunction with the outstanding results my husband got from drinking bitter melon tea, we also follow the eating advice in the book entitled “The New Glucose Revolution” by Dr. Jennie Brand-Miller. This way of eating will keep your blood glucose stable, enable you to control your weight and learn to eat in a way that is not as restrictive.

    For example, your body needs carbs. Therefore, if you lower your carb intake so low, you will start feeling really tired and start losing muscle mass. From “The New Glucose Revolution” we learned that there is one type of white rice that is low glycemic and that is basamati rice. So for some of you that hate the taste of brown rice, try basamati. My husband eats this type of rice now and tests his blood glucose regularly and there doesn’t seem to be any spikes in blood glucose. He still eats spaghetti but only uses thin spaghetti noodles cooked al dente and sauce is put on top of pasta right before consuming. Also, we learned from the book that cheese tortellini is low glycemic. A small slice of angel food cake is also low glycemic. All these things mentioned above, who would have thought that these foods would be okay to eat by diabetics.

    When my husband was first diagnosed with Type 2, it scared him so bad that all he would eat is vegetable soups, salads, grilled chicken or fish and hardly anything as he was trying to cut out everything that he preceived was not okay to eat. It was a boring, restrictive and depressing diet until we started following the advice in the book. In the beginning, we thought we could never eat out at a restaurant again. Now after reading the book, we now have knowledge of what foods or combinations of foods help balance your glycemic load.

    Hope all of you will consider getting a copy of this book.

    Posted by Debbie |
  72. I discussed with my doctor. Was told that diabetes is chronic and that recent studies have shown that people who are diagnosed can significantly improve the symptoms but that the study shows they can only stave off further progression for 3-4 years at best. She advised completely an altered diet and exercise and so on BUT stated that once you have it, medical science still firmly believes that it is chronic and will get worse over time no matter what. How much time is the question… depends on the person and many other factors. Anyway - that’s what I was told. There are a lot of people making a lot of money selling books and hope. It’s all good for those who want to believe because in the end they will most likely have improved their health.

    Posted by IMan |
  73. IMan, I think your doctor is wrong. The studies she refers to defined “good control” as an A1C of 7% or better, which is not tight control at all. It means you will have high blood glucose levels much of the day (after meals). With really tight control, which is possible on the diets I mention, progression is avoidable, and major improvement is possible. In my opinion, but also in many others’. See the full-length article I wrote called “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: Can It Be Done?”.

    David

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  74. It seems to me, having read half way through Gary Taubes book Diet dilusion that the research has been done as far back as the 1920s regarding the benefits of a low carb high fat high protein diet and the toxicity of refined sugars/flours and processed foods but this information has not been passed on to the diabetic patients for them to make an informed choice of which diet. I was advised to eat more carbs, brown rice, sweet potatoes and fruit! and to exercise. On the advised diet I have kept the diabetes under control and last year was told I was out of the diabetic range. But having read this book I think my blood sugar level is even more stable. I haven’t had a great deal of success with weight loss but on this low carb diet I think the “fat” is disappearing round my waist and abdomen. Have only been on the low carb diet for a few weeks so will see how it goes in a few months. The great thing about this low carb diet is I don’t feel hungry and I don’t crave sweet stuff. Before being diagnosed as having Type 2 I did used to eat a lot of chocolate and like a nice bottle of wine! I do believe there is hope to avoid this illness deteriorating if you are determined enough to change the bad eating habits.

    Posted by Chaddy |
  75. I do believe that the medical profession are too quick to put diabetics on medication. When I was first diagnosed I was automatically put on statins which I wasn’t at all happy about but you take advice from the so called experts. Later I developed an allergic reaction and it wasn’t clear whether or not is was the statins so I was taken off of these. It turned out the allergy was to penicillin but I chose not to go back onto the statins having read up about them. At one point my annual diabetic test showed my blood sugar level was 7.1 (should have been between 4 and 7) and for that 0.1 the medical profession wanted to put me on metformin which I refused and said I would be more strict with the diet. which I was and, like I said in the earlier comment, I am now out of the diabetic range, although the diabetic nurse still insisted I was diabetic. I don’t mind being classed as diabetic as I get to get all the tests done annually in case it creeps up.

    Posted by Chaddy |
  76. Thanks David, for your inspiring article. More diabetics need to hear your message.

    I am an over-the-road truck driver, and was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, after a couple of years of struggling with extremely high blood sugar (for the record let me say I was totally at fault.) I indulged and enjoyed everything that even looked sweet.

    I finally went to the doctor, after suffering several months with dangerous weight loss, blurred vision, and an embarrassing need to urinated constantly. My doctor prescribed meds and sent me on my way until the following month. All the literature he gave me to read was all about managing the disease.

    Years ago, I managed a sports nutrition store and taught and coached our customers and clients the importance of nutrition. I had strayed so far from the reality of the message.

    Fast forward 13 years later, now diagnosed with Diabetes, I reverted back to what I learned and taught others, and needed to re-apply in my life.

    Long story short, I was able to stabilize my blood sugar in 21 days. My Diabetes disappeared and I have remained Diabetes Free, and feel healthier than ever.

    Nutrition plays a major role in our health and wellbeing. I eat mostly plant-based and whole grain foods. I still eat meat, just not nearly as much. I snack on fruits and nuts, and avoid obvious and hidden sugars.

    Most definitely, Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. I am living proof.

    Keep up the great work!

    Posted by Dino |
  77. i my story but i am not understand english very well but i have my story may be it will help any person in diabetes so i want write it in urdu language but may be many of people cant understand about urdu.

    Posted by wseem uddin |
  78. i think diabetes is the cause of use of antibiotic medicen because when i was fell in throat infection and i use frequently antibiotic medicen meanwhile i feel the thirst and thirst too much and after three days when i went to hospital than my blood test shows that i am suffering in diabetes this first time when i know so pls don’t use antibiotic medicen although it is necessary

    Posted by wseem uddin |
  79. Hi all…
    very late here in colorado. I woke up with extremely low blood sugar.. very uncomfortable.. had to eat something, then found this web page. very interesting and encouraging stuff. Would like some commentary on my situation.
    been t2 for about 5-7 years. A1c at worst was 11.5.. best has been 7.5… a short time ago, i got sick of the idea of not being around for my kids. I decided to make a change. regular, sometimes torturous, rigorous excercise and closely watching my diet where I send in my nutrition to a nutritionist daily. I take metformin 1000mg/twice daily and 5mg glyburide in the morning and at night. Now I am finding that my readings can dip down to 40-60 at night and it is very uncomfortable. is this a sign that my lifestyle change is working? should i be talking with my doctor about possibly reducing some meds? and.. could this path reverse me? I am 6-2 and 248 lbs. 48 yrs old. replies are appreciated. love this site.

    Posted by Tony Maggio |
  80. Tony, I am not a doctor, but it seems highly likely to be that you need to stop the glyburide. That is what is causing the lows. Ask your doctor about that today.

    As far as whether your lifestyle changes are working, you can easily test that by checking your blood glucose levels frequently and getting an A1C test every couple of months.

    Thanks for writing, and keep us posted.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  81. I wanted to follow up on my post from February 7, 2013 in which I wrote that my husband was keeping his blood glucose in check by drinking a cup of bittermelon tea once after breakfast and once after dinner. He is not taking any Metforim anymore. Two days ago he had a complete physical and got the results of his blood tests. Amazingly not only is his blood glucose normal, his trygliceride level went from 800+ last year to 139. His bad cholestrol went down to normal range and his good cholestrol went up to where it’s supposed to be. He has not had results like this in over ten years. I’m telling all of you that this is what drinking bittermelon tea has done for him. He hasn’t even been exercising much but he is going to start.

    Posted by Debbie |
  82. How To Reverse Diabetes Starting On Day One

    There are two “rules” to follow for those who want to know how without having to hear my story and all the particulars.

    1. Eat only when hungry.

    2. Eat oatmeal for the first meal of the day and then healthy food thereafter.

    I am a 71 year old guy diagnosed as a diabetic probably 15 years ago. My health provider has prescribed Metformin, Glyburide, and Glipizide for my diabetes. She has been talking about putting me on insulin. She has also has me on four different blood pressure medicines plus one for cholesterol.

    I no longer take any of these awful medicines with sickening side effects. I can’t. My numbers are all now too low. Each morning I check my blood glucose and my blood pressure. So should you.

    For the past week my blood pressure readings were:

    116/75
    109/77
    122/84
    112/73
    104/71
    126/88
    133/79

    My glucose readings were 114, 104, 90, 98, 97, 116, 97. These are all normal healthy readings. As long as I can keep my readings in these healthy ranges, I would be foolish to take those pills. I have no intention of following doctors’ orders to eat and take my meds ever.

    Mothers, doctors, nutritionists, and cereal makers all keep repeating the same old nonsense: “You must eat!” This is so not true. Humans have evolved to eat now and then. Not eating when not hungry will not make you sick. Even fasting is actually healthful.

    So, how to beat diabetes. Day 1. Check your blood sugar. If it is 80 or less. You have an appetite. You are ready to eat the first meal of the day which should be oatmeal. Why oatmeal? It’s the number one healthy food.

    Of course, your blood sugar (and mine) is much, maybe much much, higher than 80. My number 1 rule is eat only when hungry. If you eat when your blood sugar is over 80, you aren’t really hungry. You are eating when you aren’t hungry which raises your blood sugar and then you are a fat diabetic. So what to do? Nothing. You wait and keep checking your BG with your meter until it drops to at least 80. If you’re tough and really serious about kicking diabetes, refrain from eating until your sugar hits 70. What if by 8:00 PM rolls around and your meter still shows a reading of 100+? I met a really fat dude like that once. He had to sleep sitting up. He said he didn’t get hungry for three days when he didn’t eat. Not eating for 24 hours will not harm you. Go to bed and check your BG in the morning, repeat day 1.

    OK, so when you are hungry (a reading of 80), eat a bowl of oatmeal with whatever you like (fruit, nuts, etc). Oatmeal takes away your hunger for hours. When your hunger returns (don’t eat if you aren’t hungry) eat a moderate portion of healthy food like salads, veggies, yogurt, etc. Try not to gorge. Your goal is to keep your blood sugar in the sweet spot of 70-100. If you don’t eat until you are hungry, then when you do eat, your BG will always remain below 100 and you will have beaten diabetes from day 1. If your reading the next morning is over 100, you ate too much the night before. Day 2: see day one.

    Trying to deal with diabetes while gorging every time you have a slight appetite won’t work. Eating five times a day and taking pills won’t work. What I have explained does work. No longer do I have nerve pains in my legs, night cramps, gout, prostate problems, and all the horrible side effects of diabetes drugs. My weight is dropping rapidly. I am extremely pleased with my progress and amazed at how easy it is to follow this simple regimen. It’s not a tummy; it’s a big fat belly! Don’t pamper it by feeding it when it really isn’t hungry!

    Posted by Raymond W. Ware |
  83. A Blood Pressure Scare

    Since I began eating only when hungry and having oatmeal for the first meal of the day, I have been checking my blood pressure and blood sugar every morning. This morning–oh no! My BP is 148/91! Am I going to have to go back on blood pressure medicine? Yikes! What has happened?

    My morning BP yesterday was 120/72. My blood glucose was 91. Both excellent numbers. Oatmeal was my first meal of the day at 2:00 PM. 7:00 PM I had a large salad. So far so good. The salad was lettuce, tomatoes, onions, avocado, some cream cheese, Italian salad dressing, and black olives. Hm, black olives–over half a can. Let’s take a look at that can. Serving size: 4 olives. Servings per container: about 11. I ate over half a can, so I ate like 6 servings. Checking the sodium content per serving: 115mg. My 6 servings x 115 mg = 690mg. Wow! No wonder my blood pressure was way up! I had no idea. I thought black olives were good for a body. I always ate them a lot. And to think that I used to add black olives to my pizza! Talk about a double whammy!

    I used to never check my blood pressure. I figured I couldn’t do much about it; it is what it is. Now I realize that a high BP reading is a big clue about eating the wrong thing and that taking charge of diabetes means monitoring blood pressure.

    One of my toes was very sore when I woke up this morning. Is it connected to the bolus of salt I ingested? I think so. It certainly wasn’t caused by high blood sugar: my blood glucose reading this morning was 78. Happily, eating only when hungry with the first meal of oatmeal has reversed my diabetes.

    Posted by Raymond W. Ware |
  84. I am 69 yoa and have type 2 diabetes. my PC phy. put me on lantus 2 days ago because my erratic bg numbers and A1c from 7.3 to 8.4. this morning woke up with a reading of 202 and starving. what does one eat to lower bg or just get something in their stomach. I wish their was a cure for diabetes because you get more sypmtoms of other diseases that come from diabetes. if someone is reading this blog can you respond, thank you. Ben

    Posted by ben marino |
  85. dear all,
    please advise me and write your idea on my diabet situation,
    my age is 24 and from last 5 months i am suffering from diabetes,
    last 2 month i was in a very bad situation my Glucose of FBS was 300 and i met so many doctors and finally they referred me to take insulin and i also did injection for 15 days and the insulin was also not suitable for me, afterward i me found a person, he gave me some type of honey and advised my to eat barley floor bread, and now my Glucose level is between 90 to 105 (FBS) with out taking insulin and tablets, please share your respected ideas about my current situation, do you think i treated and healthy now??????????? and or it is just for some time??????? please help me

    Posted by naqeeb |
  86. HI Naqeeb,

    I’m glad your glucose has come down so fast. I know nothing about this honey and barley flour treatment. It’s hard to believe it could be that effective that fast. Tell us more about it.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  87. I am a t2 diabetic, who has had diabetes for 8 years, who is just recently become insunlin dependent.I’ve been reading books by Dr. Neal Barnards Program for Reversing Diabetes and also Dr.
    Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. They give such differnt advice. It is very confusing.

    I currently take 1000mg of metforming in the morning and nuvalog at breakfast, lunch, and dinner according to a sliding scale–ranging from 17-24 units At bedtime I take 80 units of levemir. I want to lose weight desperately and see if I can normalize my glucose readings and perhaps get off at least some of my medicine. I feel like Dr. Barnards’s program makes more sense for me,

    Just curious to find out what the rest of you might think.

    Posted by Karen M |
  88. Following are my fasting and post prandial blood sugar readings during 2013:

    9th March 169.5/315.3
    23rd March 117.3/209
    6th April 103.1/183.2
    23rd April 113.9/230.9

    I resumed doing Kapalbathi Pranayam for 15 mgs both
    morning and evening from 10th March and I could see the results in the readings on 23rd and 6th. I had cataract surgery on 12th April and I was advised not to do any exercises for 6 weeks. And the result on 23rd April showed a rise in the readings.

    I am confused. Should I consider myself to be prediabetes or diabetic and take the advice of an endocrninologist about starting on medication. The physician who checked me before the surgery found that my Random Blood Sugar level was 156 and said not to bother about diabetes as I was control the sugar levels with diet and Pranayama.

    But some doctors say that once the readings are in the levels for diabetes, there is no other go except to start on life long medication. According to them the only proof of one not having diabetes is that even after eating normal sugar containing items, it should not reflect in blood sugar levels. I am 70 years and for the past 20 years my blood sugar has been mostly in the normal range except for occasional drift into prediabetes level. Can someone throw light?

    Posted by Josepth P |
  89. Hi Karen,

    My vote is for you to pick a diet that makes sense to you and do it, hard. You’re on a lot of insulin. Dr. Barnard’s diet works, as do Bernstein’s, and many others. Pick one and go for it. Don’t worry about the weight; that will follow. Just check your blood glucose levels.

    Joseph, your numbers say you are prediabetic. I don’t think you need medicine for that. But your postprandials are too high. Try getting them down by dietary changes you can live with, perhaps some of the suggestions in this blog.

    But possibly some medicine would help. You don’t say what your A1c is. That would be the best way to know if you medicines would help or not. And it’s absolutely NOT true that “once on medications, on them for life.” Hundreds or thousands of our readers could testify that they have reduced or discontinued medicines.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  90. Being told i was diabetic was a strange experience, i wasn’t scared of my nerves, eyes, veins, feet or Kidneys or anything else. I just felt happy i had an answer to why i felt so bad…. I walk 30 minutes a day and I’ve pretty much gone vegan, legumes, fruit and vegetables both steamed and fresh, helathy fats omega threes nuts and a spoon full of chia seeds, coconut oil (cold pressed and virgin) one table spoon a day. I hoped i could stomach oats but i seem to spike so i’ve put them to the side for the time being. And i have to say i love salt but i’ve noticed the less salt a food has the less i eat so for that reason i’m cutting back. And i have to be careful at breakfast for some reason i’m more prone to spiking. i can handle two to three pieces of fruit a day spread out of course and that to me brings me the greatest joy. I’m on metformin and the numbers are fine so i’m happy.

    I read about intermittent fasting so i tried it this weekend ate two small meals about three hours apart and by the end of the weekend i’d lost weight and my fasting glucose numbers fell below 5. This is all new of course.

    Reading some of these post though does fill me with fear. Fear for so much of my body! My organs and cardiovascular system, my nervous system. Theirs so much that can go wrong… I don’t want to reverse diabetes! I just don’t want to become complacent or give up…. I don’t want to say i had a good year or a bad one and i don’t want to progressively get worse. This is the rest of my life and i just hope i realize i can never indulge on food again. And i hope the answer is as easy as that and not more complex?

    Posted by Pedro M |
  91. I,m 50years old with type 2 diabetes major heart condition 2 major heart attacks bypass surgery 11 stents i was taking 4 to 5 shots of insulin a day finally i said enough is enough i join the gym started walking excercising eating all the right foods my overall health changed went from 4 to 5 shots a day to none lossed 18 pounds the first month ,can you turn diabetes around maybe not but you sure can make a difference if your willing to try .feeling better still working out the kinks .

    Posted by steve |
  92. Steve provides excellent experience data.

    As a 30 year type 2 my read is that one can and should modify diet, exercise and any required meds to stop the rot.

    Part B is: now that the numbers under control, how much healing goes on as a result ( the reversing part)

    My take is my retina’s healed, my pancreas came back and did more, my weight came down, got off actos, glyburide/starlix, got off 75/25 insulin, kidneys stopped going south and stabalized. Am down to small amounts of humalog lispro and metformin. Was using lantus as well and found I did not need any more at this time.

    So in summary - stop rot - yes for sure. How much healing goes on is unclear once numbers back to more normal range. As ole goat I am pleasantly surprised.

    Posted by jim snell |
  93. I reversed my diabetes 2 when all the world and my doctor was against me - did it by exercise and diet in 2009. Life changes and ill health for other reasons meant my weight came back and the diabetes. My doctor put me on Metformin this year. Awful psychological changes and physical and I was even more depressed than before.
    I was very glad to see this article and other posts as it has re-instated my hope of returning my sugar levels to normal. With great difficulty I am increasing my fitness level, slowly but surely. This week I ran out of the metformin and did not get any on time because of some problem at the surgery. So I have not taken any - feel 100% better without it - BUT I know that I have to find the alternative. On an Ayruvedic diet and trying to exercise at least every other day, if not every day.
    Look at the processed food - and if I miss it I remind myself it is poison.
    Thank You for helping me regain some of my confidence to do it again!

    Posted by suki |
  94. I was diagnosed with type 2diabetes and put on insulin - after one week the dosage caused low blood sugar levels and I was put on a pill to use twice daily, still caused the lower blood sugar levels and I ended up with one pill per day - regular exercise, low carbs, vegan, whole grain meals, lean meats in small proportions like lean pork/veal/chicken and some fruits - I recently noted that my levels are in the NORMAL RANGE for an entire two weeks without the treatment, I continue to monitor my levels which are between 70 and 140 - while I continue to monitor my LEVELS, I am hopeful that [diabetes is reversed]

    Posted by Pria |
  95. SO SORRY FOR LONG POST, MIDDLE OF NIGHT AND I’M NUMB, DEVASTATED, HEARTBROKEN, CONFUSED, LOOKING FOR SUPPORT. Husband shot himself this morn after being diabetic for 16 yrs, just went on insulin, along w/previous oral meds glyburide, glucophage, metformin, on and off Actos, mostly on. His ACL was only within safe range occasionally, sugar levels spiked and dropped constantly. He was former athlete, lost 15 lbs ate ext healthy, no refined sugars, oatmeal with coconut oil or eggs w/no meat or toast for breakfast, mostly salads and chicken, occasional lo-carb yogurts, drank nothing except water & coffee. Couple of weeks ago was informed that weight loss and oral meds were never going to work, pancreas not secreting, dr’s concerned about kidney,bladder,damage, brain damage from circulation, he had horrible varicose veins, constant mouth/dental infections/antibotics, not abscesses, but flare ups and sore spots, extreme fatigue, esp after meals, frequent headaches,. Dr’s assured us kidney bladder pancreas, brain function were being closely monitored at 3 month checkups. What he didn’t tell me was that he was to begin dialysis immediately. There were NO signs, signals, threats, etc, ever of suicide. We had even discussed how stupid it was because we’re all going to die anyway. nobody who knows/knew him can believe it ‘cos he was totally not the type, I buried my father one month ago after death from kidney damage from alcoholism. It was a horrible, demeaning ordeal with him dying at home. My father also had behavioral frontotemporal dementia from kidney damage and was mean, hostile, totally narcissistic, with no considerations or compassion for anyone but himself. My sweet beautiful husband thought I was going to have to do it all again for him.
    I feel like the Actos is prob to blame for added organ damage, along with diabetes, of course. He was a worrier, like his father, with pretty high stress level naturally and was only given Xanax a week ago when he started insulin shots, had been on Lexapro for maybe a year, which didn’t do much for depression, but maybe stopped it from progressing. Lexapro causes suicidal thoughts in some ppl. I tried to get him to change dr.’s when sugar levels never normalized, wanting him to see endriconoligist, but he liked his dr, who was g.p. When I went to bed last night, he was watching basketball game, as usual. He always got up at 5 or 6 a.m., and was always up & out of bed when I awakened. I didn’t tell him I loved him last night, which I always did, but I was still exhausted from father’s death and was taking him for granted and being short & snappy with him., but apologizing, & he knew how I felt about him and I know he loved me, would never do thing to hurt me or himself. Next think I knew, cops whew knocking on my doors & windows waking me up this morn. LONG DAY, had to make them pump him full of max legal dose of pain meds & unplug & unhook, organ donor ppl holding me hostage. Held his hand, talked to him, told him it was ok. Go on, follow the light and that I knew he loved me & I would always adore him. His hands were already cold, no response, reaction, to voice or touch, was dead except for machines, which he should not have been on, no brain activity, took me 4 hrs to make them do it. Please remember we are at mercy of medical, insurance, funeral home, big pharma system/rackets. God bless us all and give me/us strength to accept his will. If I can forgive him for suicide, so can God. I would give anything for any more time with him, even sick. Maybe I don’t know everything dr.’s told him, maybe malignancies or something.
    Anybody reading, I need thoughts, ideas, guidance , and I send you peace, love and compassion.

    Posted by Terri Kimble |
  96. Dear Terri,

    Don’t know what to tell you right now except that you are loved. Don’t forget that. Only advice I can give is to get as much help as you can. Call in all your markers.
    Hope our readers have other help for you. I’m touched that you considered us a source of support. Please do it again if it will help.

    Love,
    David Spero RN

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  97. I was diagnosed with diabetes in February 2013. I had gotten extremely sick one night after having three pieces of pizza and an Italian pasty. I woke up the next morning dizzy and slightly confused. My neighbor came over and said she wanted to check my blood sugar. I immediately went to the doctor when I found out that I had a fasting glucose of 279.

    The doctor put me on medformin. I was on high blood pressure medicine as well. My total cholesterol was high, HDL, LDL, triglycerides were all out of whack. Additionally, I had very elevated liver enzymes. I was a mess.

    I decided at this time that I needed to take control of my life. Against my doctors advice, I went off the medformin. I started going to the gym and doing about 40 minutes of cardo and some light weights. I went to a nutritionist and changed my eating habits. I did not eliminate any food group at all. I decreased my carbs, no more than 45g with each meal and 15g of carbs for 2 snacks a day.

    Four months later my blood work is completely normal. Cholesterol, HDL, LDL, Triglycerides all in normal range. Liver enzymes normal. I’m no longer on high blood pressure medicine. My blood pressure is actually low now. Last blood pressure check was 92/62. My A1C was 10 when I was diagnosed. It is now 5.8. BTW….I lost 23 lbs. without even trying.

    As strange as this may sound, diabetes SAVED my life. I think about what I eat and do every day. I still eat fast food due to my extensive work travel. I’ve learned what to eat and make better choices when I do decide to have fast food. I’ve been a little lax with the gym but working through that.

    Is it possible to reverse diabetes? ABSOLUTELY YES, I don’t know how long it will last but I now believe that if you take care of your body, it will take care of you.

    Posted by Patrick |
  98. can some please tell me if I have a high level in diabetes, it read as 7.2 or am I borderline…please help ..so confused.. Dr wanted to put me on meds, but I said I wanted to try and lose weight and excise.. I asked my friend who has a monitor for diabetes and she done it and it is now 6.2..i
    m so confused..

    Posted by emma walker |
  99. Hi Emma,

    If we’re talking about fasting blood glucose levels, 6.2 would be called “prediabetic” (112 in the USA system). I would say continue the diet and exercise; it’s working. 7.2 (130 US) is near the low end of the diabetic range, so putting you on metformin was not a terrible idea. But if you can do it with lifestyle, go for it! Many of our readers have.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  100. I’m prediabetic, but according to my cardiologist, either yourare diabetic or not. Anyway, great article and comments. Some doctors, and I don’t care who they are want to shove the latest, trendy pill down your throat. Years ago I was going through a stressful period at work. My BP was hovering about 140/90 not quite but close. Right away my doctor wanted to put me on the latest “hip” drug for BP. Didn’t even mention the exercise or diet thing. But of course, the same day I was sitting in his office, there was a representative from one of the many drug companies pushing free samples. Pills aren’t always the answer.

    Posted by Robert |
  101. I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic about 2 or 3 years ago, at least. Last summer, I was actually diagnosed with Type II diabetes but was told it could be easily reversed if I would take the proper steps to do so. Dec. 1, 2012, I started the Atkins Diet. I have not exercised but cut out all sugar, breads, most carbs, fried foods, processed foods, soft drinks, juices, sweet tea, etc. I only have meat, fresh and frozen veggies, lots of sweet potatoes (w/added cinnamon for lower blood sugar), Greek yogurt w/fruit, salads, one cup of coffee w/non-dairy creamer and the rest is WATER! I use Stevia instead of sugar. I suffer with chronic headaches/migraines and have been on disability for over 9 years; that’s why I have not done the walking I should. I will be doing that VERY soon. That should really help burn more calories and get my weight down further. I have only lost 17 lbs. in over 6 months, just a little discouraging. BUT, my triglycerides have gone from 301 to 200, my AIC has dropped from 6.6 to 5.9, and my hemoglobin is 14.1 (with 15 being the highest)!! I have lost 4 sizes in the past 2 1/2 years and finally see light at the end of the tunnel. I have approx. 45 more lbs. to go. I am very encouraged and not on any diabetic meds!!

    Posted by Paula Montenegro |
  102. 30 yrs old …newly diagnosed with type 2….my sugars were 300 on admission…today I had a fasting of 150…..random sugars after lunch was 240. Started on glucophage 500mg twice daily….wth exercise andright diet I believe I can lower ths to normal values with no medication.

    Posted by ernest |
  103. At age 71 I have been diagnosed with Diabetes Type II.

    I want to do the best for myself with this disease. I understand that if I don’t take care - eating right and exercising - I might suffer many things.

    I am retired and volunteer. I feel that I should give the volunteering up and take care of myself!!

    Is this correct thinking?

    Thanks for your ideas.

    Posted by Dee |
  104. Hi Dee,

    Volunteering is generally good for you, if it’s something you feel good about doing. If you’re not happy about it, then maybe you should find something else. You don’t need that much exercise — most experts say 30 minutes a day is enough, along with keeping active (moving around) throughout the day.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  105. I was diagnosed with T2 diabetes in Dec 2011. This after being diagnosed with RA in 2002 and Bipolar Disorder in 2009. I also have thyroid nodules and require bi-annual biopsies. I progressed from Metformin (which caused itchy hives) to Diamicron with Januvia, then to Lantus with Humilin R. Recently I was put on Insulin 70/30 30 units a day. My fasting glucose is between 180 and 280 every day. I NEED HELP. I’m 38 years old, weigh 148lbs and am 5′8″. It’s a struggle for me to keep the weight on, I tend to lose too much weight to quickly. BP is usually low also. Help please

    Posted by Donnette |
  106. I moved my A1c from about 7.2 to 6.2, because of determination not to take meds. I had tried just one day of Metformin at my dr’s request & found myself hit with such awful diarrhea that I spent the day in the restroom. I was pretty angry about it & vowed to my dr that I’d take no meds.

    I began trial & error with my diet & exercise. I consulted everything I could absorb on the internet. Initially I lost about 20 pounds, then plateaued. That’s when I visited a reg. dietician specializing in diabetes. She mapped out a plan of even distribution of carbs. What a darn nuisance that was! But I stuck with it for a couple of months until I discovered Dr. Fuhrman’s Eat to Live program.

    Except that I love having an egg with about 2 cups of sauteed kale in the morning, I’ve pretty much eliminated animal products from my diet. I feel better, but the scale isn’t moving, so I’ve now cut wheat products with the occasional single slice a day of bread. Of course I avoid all starchy vegetables. Frequently I use green smoothies with a base of unsweetened almond milk. I even indulge 1/3 of a banana in the smoothie for sweetness, with no ill effect. My blood glucose is fairly steady & when it does go up, I can always identify the dietary reason.

    How long can I go this way? Well, I’ve been at the Fuhrman piece of it for just over 4 months. I’ve come to enjoy eating this way almost entirely.

    The hardest parts for me: keeping daily accurate written track of food intake with all its components; sticking to the regimen when away from home; exercising daily; & every so often wanting a hot dog.

    I hope this helps someone.

    Posted by Vera |
  107. Oh yes…..I’m 80 years old, take only levoxyl 112 & the lowest possible dose of hydrochlorothiazide.

    Posted by Vera |
  108. Here is what I believe about developing diabetes in later
    years. And here is by I believe it absolutely can be reversed.
    1. I was an avid jogger from age 35 to 50. I ran about
    12 to 15 miles a week.
    2. At age 50 I broke my foot, shoulder and jaw by a ladder
    sliding out from under me. Two things happened and this
    I’m convinced happens to many people in a rehab mode
    First of all, during the time you should allow youtself
    to hurt, you resist being helped and not only
    stress everyone around you out, you remain
    In a constant state of angry stress and an
    early stage of depression. I know you can’t
    be healthy or heal properly in this state
    Of mind. But, you go through the physical
    therapy, trying not to take pain meds or
    allow yourself to hurt. Fractures heal.
    This attitude doesn’t. I had a reversal
    and a several years setback. Instead of
    getting up and developing my muscles
    at the proper time, I withdrew and gave in
    to the pain and was depressed because
    Mentally I wasn’t ready to begin a healthy
    rehab because I never really relaxed and
    allowed myself to be cared for when I should
    have. I felt guilty about being in bed etc.
    in the early rehab stages. I felt I should
    be working but I couldn’t physically do
    much of anything. So, guess what. I began
    allowing myself to hurt later and I did hurt
    but I didn’t push myself to get going when
    I should have. As a result, I did not establish
    my daily exercise routine. I did start working
    and pushing myself( driving, stressing) much
    harder than necessary. I was tired and depressed
    because I didn’t have the stamina I had
    and I couldn’t jog anymore. So, I gave in to
    the pain and rested more when I should have
    been reestablishing some kind of routine
    exercise. I do have chronic pain and I was
    taking pain meds legit, I still am. But, I was
    also allowing my depressed attitude, sleepy
    side effects, and feeling sorry for myself
    when I shouldn’t have been hurting any more.
    But I was hurting and I was eating good.
    I went from 190 lb 5′12″ healthy guy to
    a weight between 220 to 250. Not really
    eating a poor diet. Eating large portions and
    not exercising. I had started running at 35
    to treat high BP and I was on a low cal
    diet. Not necessarily lo sugar or lo carb.
    Well I finally snapped out of my dilemma
    at about 55. But I could not re establish
    exercising. I had blood tests frequently
    because I take BP meds. And, I had taken
    cholesterol meds too. Never had high sugar
    or trglycetides. About 2 or 3 years ago,
    My sugar was elevated. My doc put me on
    meds and I lost about 35 pounds. I couldn’t
    tolerate the meds at that time. But after
    staying with nutrisystem and walking
    and swimming, my sugar level dropped
    to normal as well as tri and chol. Well about
    6 months ago, tris were sky high about600
    and blood sugar anout 8.6/ maybe 210 or so
    fasting. I have just begun metformin and
    a little green pill, and gemfibrozil for tri.
    I have been testing my blood/gluc level
    at differen times and first day just beginning
    a locarb/ losugar diet and metformin 500mg
    to 2000 mg depending on nausea, my
    first reading was 245 and has been as low
    as 159. I’m a believer in the resilience of
    the human body. I don’t think my pancreas
    is secreting less insulin. I think I’m overloading
    it’s capacity from my inscribe slow metabolism.
    I’ll keep you guys posted. How many carbs
    are too many over a 24 hr period

    Posted by R beall |
  109. I’m a 10 stone 6oz, 51 year old type 2 diabetic.
    I’ve cycled virtually all my life and complete around 80 to 100 miles in an average week as well as playing football.
    When I visit my doctor, he always seems puzzled and always refers me at first to the nurse. She always says to me that I look like a type 1 patient as she has never seen a patient who looks so fit who is type 2.
    After reading some of this web page is there anything safely I could do to help me manage my condition .
    I am taking 3 metphormine and one glizocide.(Not sure about the spelling)

    Posted by Greg |
  110. Greg,

    It sounds like you may not be producing enough insulin. I would ask to be checked for insulin production (a C-peptide test) and for anti-insulin antibodies to see if your immune system is attacking your pancreas.

    You might benefit from insulin or some other drug. I might also suggest bitter melon tea, as we have discussed on this site. It sometimes works as a substitute for insulin.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  111. I know that my ex-wife (age 47) was a type 2 diabetic for years and took insulin daily. Eventually she became so tired of taking the insulin that she went on a very low carb diet and began exercising vigorously on a daily basis.

    Now she no longer requires insulin and travels around the country running half-marathons.

    I’ve modeled my own diet after hers, and have found that once I broke the “carb death spiral” I had more control of eating habits than I ever imagined possible (for me the secret to kicking carbs was switching from refined carbos to fresh fruits and the occasional spoonful of peanut butter, and then tapering that down a bit over time).

    So far I’m down 80 pounds over the past 18 months, and am looking foward to dropping another 80 in the months to come. Hopefully I’ll never have to deal with insulin.

    Posted by Rich Bryant |
  112. Dear David,

    I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes June 28, 2013 and it hit me like a ton of bricks..I was so angry..in denial and very down..and worse of all in doubt..I doubted myself that I didn’t have anything and told myself that
    nothing was wrong with me and that I was okay..

    but I wasn’t..my bld sugar reading was very high up to 300 that day so my doctor put me on metformin and glipizide. Its so hard for me to adjust eating differently..I mean I like fruits and vegetables..I just get depressed overall cus I feel like I can’t eat just anything anymore..it an upsetting feeling for me..I’m still trying to adjust and I feel tired..no energy..I feel like a senior citizen..lol..I feel cranky too..my emotions are all mixed up..I don’t want to feel this way anymore..I want to feel like my old self again. The energetic woman I use to be..!

    My mom..grandma and aunt have type 2 diabetes and I want this sickness out of my life for good..and I donot want to follow in their footsteps. Please help me..I want to be happy and not depressed because of this sickness..I don’t want to be miserable anymore..I want a long happy life ahead of me..I’m sorry and I apoligize that this letter is so long. I gladly appreciate it that you took the time in reading my letter. Thank you. :)

    Posted by Christine L. |
  113. Hi Christine,

    I’d like to hear what other readers have to say, but I can assure you that you don’t have to feel like a low-energy, cranky senior citizen. You can feel younger and better than you have in years, but you will have to change some of the foods you eat.

    Your body can no longer tolerate much starch or sugar; that’s why your numbers are high. That’s what diabetes is. Replace most breads, pastas, sweets, etc. with other foods that you might like better. There are many ideas on this site and others.

    The fact that you like fruits and vegetables is a good start. It’s also good that you’re angry about it — use that energy to motivate change. And ask your doctor what it would take to get off the glipizide. That drug might be contributing to your bad mood.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  114. I’m glad there’s other people who I can relate to who have type 2 diabetes..because I felt so alone and depressed i’m trying my hardest n hanging in there. If there’s anyone else that can help me in giving me sum tips..on how they first handled diabetes would be gladly appreciatied. Thank you :)

    Posted by Christine L. |
  115. Hi Guys,
    The first thing I want to say is Type 2 Diabetes is reversible. Just think how u got Diabetes - by eating lot of carbs and fats and not exercising and being overweight. i.e., your body will have excess cholesterol. If u can change your diet, and lifestyle, Diabetes will reverse, but not at the speed you expect. Diabetes develops over years and it needs at least few months to go away. If u stick on low calorie/high nutrition raw veggie diet (For ex: prescribed by Dr. Gabriel Cousens) for few months (duration depends on your disease severity) and exercise to lose weight then Diabetes will disappear once the lipid profile becomes normal. Because It has happened to me. Taking Metformin will never cure the disease since it is not attacking the root cause, it is only attacking the symptoms.

    I have almost got rid of Diabetes by sticking to low calorie, low glycemic index food and exercising a lot. I have lost 36 pounds in 8 months. If u r obese u can do juice feasting to come to normal weight. Also, I drink Cinnamon tea after each meal. I also take Fish Oil supplement.

    Also, drugs like statin’s and other drugs given for reducing cholesterol have lot of side effects (even heart attack) and I suggest not to take any of those drugs. Taking Insulin will not solve the problem either. My father is diabetic and he takes Insulin from 20 years. He already had one heart By-pass surgery and one stunt angioplasty till now. Also he had both of his eyes operated for cataract. I suggest to cure the disease naturally and not to take medications for ever and end up in severe problem one day.

    Posted by Daya |
  116. Daya makes many interesting comments along with some short cut comments.

    Having got my own mess arrested there are some important aspects of what was said namely:

    a) the type 2 disease takes time to fully blossom. That means a constant over supply of glucose causes the muscles to become overloaded and saturated. Medical science has not yet grasped the concept that muscles are not infinte storage buffers of glucose and can be constantly overloaded. Glucose control in the human body is done by storage techniques withe the hormone Insulin signalling all the skeletal muscles of available glucose to absorb
    b) correcting the mess requires literally unsaturating the excess gkucose stored everywhere and as indicated it takes time to acjieve that,
    c) pancreas islets stop making sufficient insulin when constantly exposed to excess levels of gluocse and oxidation products in blood. Get those numbers back to normal, and for many the islets come back of the rip van winkle snooze and start making insulin. University of Newcastle upon Tyne in England and their extensive work watching liver and pancreas islets using MRI spectography real time that under extreme tight diets 600 calories that as fat on islets gets absorbed and in liver, those organs come back to work. This is well before any belly fat burns off.
    d) the key is to get the glucose numbers down in blood stream and stop overloading the glucose storage in all the muscles.
    e) sometimes diet will be overwhelmed by a liver excess glucose release. Metformin can reduce that dramatically so that diet and exercise can get overall glucose reduction . Yes metformin is not a overall cure but can provide dramatic assistance getting to a cure by limiting excess glucose release. I needed to do that in my case.

    Overall these are excellent comments and ideas.

    Posted by jim snell |
  117. I was diagnosed with type 2 in 2008. I was on 2000mg of metformin and 3 diamicron tablets a day. In late 2009 I had a lap band inserted and before I lost any weight my levels dropped. I have kept to a healthy diet and exercise by walking each day and my levels now in 2013 are 4.5 on rising - i still take 750 mg of metformin each day, i think this is because my doctor believes in prevention. I also take aspirin and lipidil also blood pressure meds but i had the high blood pressure for many years before the diabetes.
    I would swear by the lapband. Any thoughts that I may regress?

    Helen

    Posted by Helen |
  118. I went to the hospital for chest pains in july about 2 wks. before my 50th birthday,not considering that forgetting to turn the ac off before going to bed.past summers this causes me to cough alot because of the sleep apnea machine I’ve been using for 7 yrs. a few days before the hospital and each one of those days I drinked several of those green apple slushes that i loved so much.the doctor came In and and asked how long had I been a diabetic,’I said I’m not,he said yes you are,and that my glucose was up to 569 and asked if I was running to the bathroom alot,I was like’ yea, but I take water pills,but a couple of nights ago I was constantly thristy,and I said i had this Intense Itch that I believe that the wipes had caused after a week ago colon follow up.I was given insulin and was being checked In the hospital when suddenly my glucose dropped to 149 then my blood pressure was dropping as we watched,now I am In a panic so was my friend and the nurse saying that my nurse is In with another patient and she don’t know what to do,I was trembling and sweating I said go get the doctor,the nurse and the doctor rushed in and the doctor ordered him(the nurse)to stop the insulin and I asked if I could have water,he said yes,eariler he said I could’nt have anything,the water appeared to help,my blood pressure started to rise and the doctor said that he can cancel the room,I hurriedly agreed,they was going to give me a heart attack for real.he prescribed me 2 mg.of glimepiride,and follow up with my doctor,I had just quit my doctor,and had this primary nurse practitioner,and she put me 500 mg.metformin twice a day with the glimepiride,and my levels continued to go low,so low that I constantly snacked and was doing this throughout the night every night,afraid to go to sleep,a few days later,I was at this clubhouse I was attended and just starting to eat when,this trembling feeling came over me,I excused myself to the bathroom,and the meter read 45 automatic panic.I rushed out scaring everybody shaking and saying I’m a diabetic give me candy give me tea its reading 45,i could’nt open the candy I threw on the table and said you open It,someone brought me tea,they brought me hot tea,it was crazy,finally got everything settled and I took myself to the hospital and they gave me a shot to calm down,they were thinking at first that I was on drugs,because I could’nt sit or stand,I had to keep moving, the meter was giving me wrong reading and caused me to have panic attacks,I am much better now that I AM NO LONGER ON THE PILLS,my level does not exceed 220 after meals,I eat all my browns breads,pasta’s rice.turkey,fish,chicken,drink splenda tea,and coke zero,cheats just a little bit on a small portion of fried food,my only symptoms Is little pricks In my toes,every now and then.

    Posted by SHELLY KELLY |
  119. In April of 2011 I found out I was a type 2 diabetic. I started eating better and I took Metforman.. Then in July I found out I had pancreatic cancer. And I had the whipple surgers and they got all the cancer and put me on chemo and radiation. Had another couple operations for my intestine and colon blockages. what I’m getting at is I believe the cancer gave me the diabeties. Since the pancreas regulates insulin. I have lost 90 pounds going through all that and I have gotten 10 back. I know whigh 120-124. What I want to know is since I lost so much weight my a1c is now 5.7 which is normal. When I do a blood check before I eat my glucose is around 70. And i’m suppose to take my meds 30 min before meals. I don’t feel like I need to since it is all ready so low. has anyone had any of these problems. When I don’t eat for about 4 hours I get a headache so I know its is low in the 70s. does this mean I have reversed my diabeties or what. I don’t know if I need to take my meds or not. when I do eat though it will go up to around 230.

    Posted by Debra Bates |
  120. I was diagnosed with pre diabetes in 1993.
    I dieted and did aerobic exercises and then got busy with life as my mother was dying of colon cancer.
    My doctor never suggested any form of insulin meds and for years I stopped having blood tests even though my glucose readings were 11- 12% to begin with.
    In 2009, I decided to take my health seriously.
    1. Stevia replaced sugar
    2. Water (filtered) replaced all soda pop,
    fruit juice. I do add with lemon for pH
    balance
    3. I eat very little red meat preferring fish,
    especially wild salmon and free run eggs.
    4. I stumbled upon GMO’s and researched Monsanto
    That means I do not eat soy, corn, or canola
    unless organic but basically I only eat
    organic soy.
    5. I threw out all bad oils and only use organic
    cold pressed coconut oil and non-fake olive
    oil. Other fats are: tahini, flax oil plus
    natural fat from avocados and cacao etc
    6. I eat veggies, fruits, raw almonds and other
    nuts and love raw almond butter.
    Last year, I decided to drop grains for beans.
    Basically I only eat sugar that is
    contained in fruits and will admit to dark
    chocolate 72% cacao and dried figs due to the
    fiber content.
    7. I never eat processed foods unless the
    labels indicate foods I approve of with no
    GMO’s nor additives that to me are not legit
    foods.

    My Hb A1C was .57% last March and hopefully the dropping of grains will lower that a bit more.
    I take supplements: krill oil (omega3), ubiquinol, magnesium, vitamin D3 and combo amino acids plus B6, B12, Folic, niacin flush and choline.

    The extra weight of 10 lb dropped without my counting calories. I do tend to eat more fat from nuts yet, it seems to agree with me. I lost the fear of calories. It actually works for me.

    I am fairly sure my problem is the metabolic disturbances which interferes with my regularity.
    In the last few years, I have been regular and that is what sets me up for decent energy that perpetuates the whole process I have developed for myself. This is the first time in my adult life I have been regular.

    Since 2009 my total cholesterol and HDL increased and LDL has dropped but not enough for my doctor since she thinks it should be below 70 or 1.81 mmol. She thinks I am on the statin but I refuse to fill the prescription. She said she has no choice.
    I used to eat a low fat diet. My trigs in 2009 were .99 mmol but my recent number was .76 mmol even with my ingesting additional fats.

    Perhaps I am deluding myself, but I really believe my diet is right for me. My doctor has no idea the extent of my diet change. I try to tell her, but she does not listen.
    When I mentioned coconut oil, she went ballistic pon me.

    ALL my numbers are in range excepting LDL and that is because she thinks I am high risk. My blood pressure is normal although I do have white coat.

    Since I do not take insulin but noticed when I was lost more then 10 lb for awhile, there was the odd time I was shaky, and had to eat something. Adding back 5 lb made all the difference.

    I am active and it is easy to be active when one has decent energy and is not plugged up.

    Posted by DianneP |
  121. After reading a lot of interesting comments indicating how we are all trying to deal with diabetes, made me think of something I read from Dr Mercola’s site. Most of the glucose is stored in the muscles, something in the nature of 300-400 grams. Obviously this is required for movement especially for active living. The liver stores approx. 60 grams of glucose which is reserved for our brains (requires a constant glucose supply but not a lot).
    Hence when the liver cannot store excess glucose, it is stored as fat elsewhere.
    Everything about our bodies is about balance.
    But how do we get into balance after being so used to the western diet of sugary fatty foods?
    When I first started researching how to reverse diabetes, one thing seemed fairly clear.
    Our livers take a beating. I remember reading, it starts with restoring health to our livers.
    I now watch what I drink (alcohol) and try to think about how my liver will react.
    This is one reason I try to stay hydrated. I also supplement with Milk Thistle drops which includes some dandelion and a few other herbs since a combo seems to work better.
    Someone mentioned cinnamon and turmeric…. yes these are great herbs for glucose clearing and I do those as well.

    Posted by DianneP |
  122. hi Im a female 55 yrs old, and menopausal. Since I became menopausal, I gained 50 lbs and have gotten high blood pressure. The doc sput me on High blood pressure med and a statin oh yeah high cholesterol too. I took the statin for two years and every thing was going well until me two yr later exam and now I have a vitamin d deffecency and am pre diabetic. Diabetes does not run in my family and being one of on I would be the first. I told my doctor that I think the statins brought me to this point and I am coming off them. I joined nutrasystem diabetic plan am taking a natural approach to the cholesterol and am taking a blood optimizer product to regain my sugar levels. Now I should lose weight and hopefully everthing will fall into place . In 1 month ill let you know how I did. I will continue with the blood pressure pill low dose of metoprolol and I also will be exercising for one hour and a half a day. I would love to hear if Im doing the right thing for I do not want to take any drugs for and am hoping all will regulate again. wish me luck

    Posted by christine |
  123. to reverse your diabetes go onto you tube and watch a video of dr.john bergman. who will explain what you have to do,everything he says will make so much sense it will sound easy.

    Posted by steven wood |
  124. Hi, I was diagnosed on 20th December with type 2 diabetes .I was put on Metformin I did a lot of research and came across professor Taylors sight. I followed his articles advice. I lost weight I have come off the medication and my sugars to date are normal blood pressure dropped . I do not know how long I will be able to stay of medication plus not enough is known about the long term successes . I find it very confusing about the carbs some say you need 230 a day some say low carb diets this is all very confusing .

    Posted by Dianne |
  125. Hi.

    I am 27 and got diagnosed with Type 2. I am obese by 60 pounds. I lost hope noticing long term complications of this dieases and mentally exhausted. I feel hopeless. Please help.

    Posted by Bruce |
  126. Hi Bruce,

    Read some of the comments posted here. Look at the approaches listed in the article. Pick one, learn about it, and try it. You can do this. Lots of people do.

    Posted by David Spero RN |
  127. Hi,
    I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes with a BG close to 500. In the two weeks since, I take Metformin (a lower dose, no side effects so far thankfully), have cut out all carbs except very low GI ones (which I still need to consume in some quantity due to a digestive issue I am slowly recovering from), eat lots of meat, fish and veggies, and have ramped up exercise. With these changes my BG stays in the 200-300 range, though it occasionally touches 150.

    I read with great interest Jim Snell’s comments on depleting glucose buffers to start reversing the effects of diabetes. What BG range should I target to trigger the depletion?

    The experiences shared in this forum have been tremendously motivating and the articles very informative and realistic about expectations. I hope to overcome this disease like so many of you have.

    Posted by TK |
  128. Why is diabetes a liver problem? Couldn’t it be an adrenal problem since the liver only makes sugar when the adrenals tell it to?

    Posted by patrick |

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Type 2 Diabetes
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