Diabetes Self-Management Blog

So I checked my mail yesterday and received a package from one of my friends who left New York a while back for a job in Texas. He sent me a few samples of an injection therapy device known as the I-Port. While it sounds like something Apple could have designed, I promise you that it requires no software or technical knowledge to understand.

You simply stick yourself once to insert the I-Port and then, for the next 72 hours, you can inject insulin through the device. Does anyone who reads this blog use this device or know anyone who uses it? If you aren’t on the pump and don’t like sticking yourself a lot, it could be worth checking out. I plan on trying it out in the next couple of weeks and I’ll let you know how it goes.

In other diabetes-related-supplies-in-the-mail news…nothing. Awesome “diabetes-related-supplies-in-the-mail news” joke, right? Seriously, I’m getting my prescriptions refilled today at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at 168th St in NYC, and I’m headed in for my much-blogged-about visit to the doctor. I’ve worked out pretty hard over the last couple of days to make me feel a little more ready for the visit.

In other news, I recently had dinner at Bar Tabac in my neighborhood. It’s one of my favorite places to eat and I typically introduce folks to my neighborhood with this restaurant. The last time I was there, I got up to use the bathroom and ended up giving myself a shot of two units of insulin in bathroom as opposed to at the table. The reason I say this is that in the bathroom I simply pulled my pants down and gave myself a shot in the leg, where at the table it’s typically a stomach hit.

Since it’s still winter in NYC, I often find myself not rotating sites as much as in the summer when I have short sleeves and shorts on. Does everyone find this? I hope one day to take my pants down in a restaurant and, when everyone is looking at me like I’m a freak about to stab a needle into my leg, calmly roll up my short shirt sleeve and inject the insulin into my arm, with my pants down, smiling at the crowd. When folks ask what I’m doing I’ll just say “I have diabetes,” and 98% of the time they will just assume that’s normal.

I’ll let you know when I do that as well.

Finally, this week was boys’ week in the Stuckey house. My friends Patrick, Adam, and Justin were in town playing at B.B. King’s and they all stayed at my place for a couple of nights before hitting the road to Baltimore to open for Taylor Hicks on Tuesday night. My wife was quite a trooper to be in a house full of boys. She prefers to go to bed on the early side while the crew in town and myself are a bit more nocturnal.

The guys opened for Leon Russell Monday night at B.B. King’s and then they tour all over the country. To see when they will be near you, or just to listen to a good Alabama singer/songwriter, check out www.adamhood.com or on myspace.com/adamhood. Also, be on the lookout for the second video by Murray and me on Heavy.com.

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Living With Diabetes
Making Adjustments (12/11/14)
Holiday Highs and Lows (12/15/14)
We All Need Help (A Thank You to Dr. Gottlieb) (12/04/14)
It's Hard Work, But We Can Manage (11/06/14)

Insulin & Other Injected Drugs
New Weekly Type 2 Diabetes Drug Approved (09/26/14)
Dispelling the Myths of Insulin Therapy (08/01/14)
Insulin for Type 2 (07/14/14)
FDA Approves Inhalable Insulin (07/03/14)

 

 

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