Diabetes Self-Management Articles

Foot problems are one of the most notorious potential consequences of diabetes. Developing good foot-care habits, inspecting your feet regularly, and wearing properly fitted footwear can help you prevent foot problems. The articles in this section tell you how.


Caring for Your Feet by Rita Weinstein

When you have diabetes, your feet need extra-careful attention. That’s because diabetes places you at a higher risk of getting foot infections. There are several reasons for this, and they are all related to high blood glucose levels…

Also inside: Foot-Care Checklist, For More Information

Common Foot Problems and Their Solutions by David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD

People with diabetes are often told to pay close attention to their feet — and for good reason. While having diabetes doesn’t make it more likely that you’ll injure your feet in the first place, having certain common diabetes complications raises the risk of minor foot problems becoming major foot problems if not treated promptly…


Coping With Painful Neuropathy by Wendy J. Meyeroff

One of the most prevalent complications of diabetes is neuropathy, or damage to the nerves. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, up to 70% of people with diabetes develop neuropathy, particularly the longer they live with diabetes…

Also inside: For Further Reading

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Laura Hieronymus, MSEd, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE, and James Borders, MD

Neuropathy is an abnormality anywhere in a nerve pathway that disrupts nerve signals, causing the brain to misinterpret feelings or sensations. Different types of neuropathy go by different names, depending on the number of nerves affected, their function, and where in the body they are located…


Foot Care by J. C. Tanenbaum, DPM

Even with diabetes, your feet can last a lifetime, and they stand a better chance of doing so if you treat them with tender, loving care. That includes giving them a daily inspection for cuts and abrasions as well as asking your doctor to examine them…


Foot Care Q&A: Part 1 by Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN

People with diabetes often have questions about how best to care for their feet and what to do when problems occur. To help answer these questions, Diabetes Self-Management interviewed several foot-care experts who regularly work with people with diabetes…


Foot Care Q&A: Part 2 by Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN

Earlier in the year we brought you Part 1 of this article, in which five foot-care experts — including four podiatrists and one pedorthist — gave advice on basic foot care, dry skin, discolored toenails, athlete’s foot, hammertoes, bunions, and peripheral neuropathy. In this installment our experts take on shoes, socks, insoles and orthotics, home remedies, and pedicures…


How to Choose Footwear by Roy H. Lidtke, DPM, CPed

Ask 10 people what they look for in a pair of shoes, and you may well get 10 different answers. But ask 10 podiatrists what they recommend in shoes for people with diabetes, and you’ll probably get about the same answer 10 times…

Also inside: Medicare Therapeutic Shoe Program, Anatomy of a Shoe, Lacing Patterns

Improving Blood Flow to the Feet by Birgitta I. Rice, MS, RPh, CHES

Many people with diabetes experience discomfort in their legs and feet, with symptoms such as cramping, numbness, tingling, and pain. Find how the WarmFeet technique can help…


Keeping Feet Healthy by Tara Dairman

As you may know, people with diabetes have good reason to take good care of their feet. Having diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels that serve the feet and legs, which can lead to loss of sensation and reduced blood circulation, raising the risk of foot ulcers and even the need for amputation…


Keeping Your Feet Healthy

Foot care is a major priority for people with diabetes. The following books, organizations, and Web sites offer information on keeping your feet healthy, and resources for how to heal them if complications arise…


Taking Steps Toward Healthy Feet by Laura Hieronymus, MSEd, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE, and Belinda O'Connell, MS, RD, CDE

Diabetes is notorious for causing foot problems. In fact, it is the number one cause of lower limb amputations in the United States. More than half of the amputations performed each year are caused by diabetes. But it doesn’t have to be this way…

Also inside: For More Information, How Can I Get My Doctor to Help Me Take Care of My Feet?, What Can I Do to Take Care of My Feet?

Treating Foot Ulcers by William J. Ennis, DO, MBA, and Patricio Meneses, PhD

No one wants to get a foot ulcer, but unfortunately, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, people with diabetes have a 15% chance of developing one at some point in their lives. Ulcers and other wounds are often the by-product of sensory neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that causes people to lose sensation on the bottoms of their feet…


What’s New in Foot Care? by Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN

It’s well known that people with diabetes are more susceptible to developing certain foot problems, including nerve damage in the feet and reduced blood circulation to the feet, than people who don’t have diabetes. Nerve damage, reduced blood circulation, and high blood glucose can make wounds slower to heal, and they also make them more likely to become infected…

Also inside: Daily Foot Care, To Learn More…

Your Annual Comprehensive Foot Exam by Timothy K. Fisher, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MD, PhD

People with diabetes face the possibility of developing a variety of diabetic complications, with the risk of each dependent on a number of factors including, first and foremost, blood glucose control. One area in which complications can occur is the feet. There is good news, however. Through early identification, diagnosis, and treatment of potential problems, the vast majority of foot-related complications can be avoided…


Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

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