Resources

June 18, 2012 4:31 pm

To read more about making personal changes – and get help making them – have a look at these resources.

Books
SWITCH
How to Change Things When Change is Hard
Chip Heath and Dan Heath
Broadway Books
New York City, 2010

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MINDLESS EATING
Why We Eat More Than We Think
Brian Wansink, PhD
Bantam Books
New York City, 2010

DIABETES BURNOUT
What to Do When You Can’t Take It Anymore
William H. Polonsky, PhD
American Diabetes Association
Alexandria, Virginia, 1999

Internet Sites
FITDAY
www.fitday.com[1]
Keeping an accurate record of the foods you eat and the activities you engage in can be very helpful for maintaining healthy habits. FitDay offers a free, online diet journal in which you can track your food intake, activity levels, mood, and more. Extra features are available for a fee.

SPARKPEOPLE
www.SparkPeople.com[2]
This site also offers ways to track your food intake and physical activities. In addition, it has information on health and diet, blogs, and online chat groups for peer support.

BEHAVIORAL DIABETES INSTITUTE
http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org[3]
The mission of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute is to address the psychological needs of people with diabetes. It offers workshops and lectures for adults and teens with diabetes in San Diego, California, as well as online videos on a variety of topics.

HELPGUIDE.ORG
www.helpguide.org[4]
Helpguide.org provides information on a variety of mental and emotional health topics, as well as tips for healthy living.

Endnotes:
  1. www.fitday.com: http://www.fitday.com
  2. www.SparkPeople.com: http://www.SparkPeople.com
  3. http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org: http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org
  4. www.helpguide.org: http://www.helpguide.org

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/general-health-issues/adopting-healthier-habits/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

July 28, 2011 4:47 pm

For recipes and more information on healthy vegetarian eating, try these resources.

Books

THE NEW BECOMING VEGETARIAN
The Essential Guide to a Healthy Vegetarian Diet
Vesanto Melina, MS, RD, and Brenda Davis, RD
Healthy Living Publications
Summertown, TN 2003

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BEING VEGETARIAN FOR DUMMIES
Suzanne Havala, MS, RD
Hungry Minds, Inc.
New York, 2001

THE VEGETARIAN WAY
Total Health for You and Your Family
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD, and Mark Messina, PhD
Three Rivers Press
New York, 1996

Web sites

The Vegetarian Resource Group
www.vrg.org[1]

Vegetarian Times
www.vegetariantimes.com[2]

Go Veg
www.goveg.com[3]

American Diabetes Association
www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/[4]

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
www.pcrm.org[5]

National Agriculture Library USDA
Vegetarian Nutrition Resource List
www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/gen/vegetarian.pdf[6]

Restaurant listings

VegGuide.org
www.vegguide.org[7]

HappyCow Compassionate Eating Guide
www.happycow.net[8]

Endnotes:
  1. www.vrg.org: http://www.vrg.org
  2. www.vegetariantimes.com: http://www.vegetariantimes.com
  3. www.goveg.com: http://www.goveg.com
  4. www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/
  5. www.pcrm.org: http://www.pcrm.org
  6. www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/gen/vegetarian.pdf: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/gen/vegetarian.pdf
  7. www.vegguide.org: http://www.vegguide.org
  8. www.happycow.net: http://www.happycow.net

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/nutrition-exercise/meal-planning/adopting-a-vegetarian-meal-plan/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

April 26, 2011 10:55 am

The Internet has numerous sites for adults living with Type 1 diabetes to find community with others and to locate helpful resources.

Online Forums and Information
AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION
http://community.diabetes.org/n/forumIndex.aspx?webtag=adaindex[1]
Message boards specifically for adults with Type 1 diabetes, as well as for people with common interests such as using an insulin pump.

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CHILDREN WITH DIABETES
www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0c_000.htm[2]
Essays by adults with Type 1 diabetes and links to other relevant Web pages.

DIABETES DAILY
www.diabetesdaily.com/forum[3]
Numerous forums, including one specifically for people with Type 1 diabetes.

JUVENILE DIABETES RESEARCH FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL
www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=106124[4]
Articles by, for, and about adults with Type 1 diabetes.

JUVENATION
http://juvenation.org/groups/adults/default.aspx[5]
Message board for adults with Type 1 diabetes.

REALITY CHECK
www.realitycheck.org.au[6]
Web site of the Australian-based nonprofit organization Type 1 Diabetes Network, Inc. Has articles, forum, free e-mail newsletter, and “Laugh” page.

Online Videos
YOUTUBE
Mike Lawson’s My Life As A Pin Cushion: “The Diabetes Police”
www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrm7z0owxoc[7]
Other entries in Lawson’s My Life as a Pin Cushion series include “Carb Counting,” “Morning Routine,” and “What is Diabetes?”

Education and Support
BEHAVIORAL DIABETES INSTITUTE
http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org[8]
(858) 336-8693
Adults with Type 1 diabetes living in the San Diego area can take advantage of the program offerings of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute, including workshops, classes, and support groups. Some programs are free, and some have a fee.

Books
GROWING UP AGAIN
Life, Loves and Oh Yeah, Diabetes
Mary Tyler Moore
St. Martin’s Press
New York, 2009

CHILDREN WITH DIABETES
“Books for Parents, Adults, and Older Kids”
www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_06_b00.htm[9]
List includes memoirs by adults with Type 1 diabetes, guides to diabetes management, and tips on getting the most from life when living with Type 1 diabetes.

Endnotes:
  1. http://community.diabetes.org/n/forumIndex.aspx?webtag=adaindex: http://community.diabetes.org/n/forumIndex.aspx?webtag=adaindex
  2. www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0c_000.htm: http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0c_000.htm
  3. www.diabetesdaily.com/forum: http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum
  4. www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=106124: http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=106124
  5. http://juvenation.org/groups/adults/default.aspx: http://juvenation.org/groups/adults/default.aspx
  6. www.realitycheck.org.au: http://www.realitycheck.org.au
  7. www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrm7z0owxoc: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrm7z0owxoc
  8. http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org: http://behavioraldiabetesinstitute.org
  9. www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_06_b00.htm: http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_06_b00.htm

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/about-diabetes/diabetes-basics/a-focus-on-adults-with-type-1-diabetes/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

August 23, 2010 4:14 pm

Contact one of these organizations for more information about hearing loss.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
(800) 241-1044
TTY: (800) 241-1055
www.nidcd.nih.gov[1]
A component of the National Institutes of Health that supports and conducts research on the processes involved in hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language with the goal of helping those who have a communication disorder. The website contains information on hearing disorders as well as links to other organizations and sources of information dealing with hearing impairment. Free publications on hearing impairment and other communication disorders can be ordered by contacting the institute.

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American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
(703) 836-4444
www.entnet.org[2]
The world’s largest academy representing ear, nose, and throat specialists. Their website contains information on a variety of health topics involving the ears, such as noise exposure and hearing aids. Some information is also available in Spanish. There is a “Find an ENT” feature, which can search for a physician by name, location, or subspecialty.

American Academy of Audiology
(800) AAA-2336 (222-2336)
www.audiology.org[3]
The world’s largest professional organization of audiologists. The website has “Consumer Guides” on a number of hearing-related topics, including information about how to purchase hearing aids and how to cope with hearing loss. It also has several guides in Spanish. The website also includes a section of frequently asked questions about audiologists and a “Find an Audiologist” feature that can search for an audiologist by location both within and outside the United States.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
(800) 638-8255
www.asha.org[4]
The professional, scientific, and credentialing association for audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists. The website provides links to a variety of organizations that sponsor self-help groups for people with hearing and balance disorders. It also has information about hearing loss, hearing loss screening, and hearing loss treatment, as well as a “Find a Professional” feature searchable by specialty, location, language of practitioner, and age of the person seeking treatment.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
(800) CDC-INFO (232-4636)
TTY: (888) 232-6348
www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise[5]
The component of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that makes recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness. The Noise and Hearing Loss prevention section of the website gives information on how to protect hearing in the workplace and also provides links to a variety of other resources for hearing health.

Endnotes:
  1. www.nidcd.nih.gov: http://www.nidcd.nih.gov
  2. www.entnet.org: http://www.entnet.org
  3. www.audiology.org: http://www.audiology.org
  4. www.asha.org: http://www.asha.org
  5. www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/general-health-issues/the-ears-have-it/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

March 30, 2009 12:00 am

The following books, Web sites, and software programs have food listings that show the amount of carbohydrate in various foods.

Books
CALORIEKING CALORIE, FAT & CARBOHYDRATE COUNTER
Allan Borushek
Family Health Publications
Costa Mesa, California, 2008

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THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO ACCURATE CARBOHYDRATE COUNTING
Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE
Marlowe & Company
New York, 2006

NUTRITION IN THE FAST LANE
The Fast-Food Dining Guide
Franklin Publishing
Indianapolis, 2008
(800) 634-1993

BOWES AND CHURCH’S FOOD VALUES OF PORTIONS COMMONLY USED
Jean A. T. Pennington and Judith S. Douglass
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
New York, 2004

GUIDE TO HEALTHY RESTAURANT EATING
Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, BC-ADM
American Diabetes Association
Alexandria, Virginia, 2005

Web Sites
www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search[1]

Portal to the US Federal Government’s comprehensive nutrient database.

For restaurants with multiple locations (including fast-food chains), simply type the name of the restaurant into a search engine. Most have their own Web sites with nutrient listings for their current menus.

Software for Computers and PDAs
Diabetes Pilot has a food database containing thousands of items; it can be personalized by marking foods as favorites and adding new foods. The software displays nutrient information for individual foods and can also add up the nutrients in several items grouped by the user as a meal. Three different versions of the software are available as downloads for use with PCs, PDAs using Palm OS, and PDAs using Pocket PC, respectively.
www.diabetespilot.com[2]

NutriGenie is an award-winning nutrition software package for PCs featuring a database with more than 8,000 items.
http://nutrigenie.biz[3]

CalorieKing Nutrition & Exercise Manager has a 50,000-item food database and is available for Macs and PCs on CD-ROM and as a download. The Handheld Diet Diary for Palm OS and the Handheld Food Database for Pocket PC are also available as downloads.
www.calorieking.com[4]

Endnotes:
  1. www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search
  2. www.diabetespilot.com: http://www.diabetespilot.com
  3. http://nutrigenie.biz: http://nutrigenie.biz
  4. www.calorieking.com: http://www.calorieking.com

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/nutrition-exercise/meal-planning/counting-carbohydrates-like-a-pro/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

April 16, 2008 12:00 am

ACCU-CHEK (ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS)
9115 Hague Road
Indianapolis, IN 46250
Phone: (800) 858-8072
Web site: www.accu-chek.com/us[1]
Manufacturer of the Accu-Chek Voicemate System (no longer being shipped to new retailers as of January 2007) and the associated Accu-Chek Comfort Curve strips, as well as a variety of conventional blood glucose meters and other diabetes supplies.

BBI HEALTHCARE
Unit A, Kestrel Way
Garngoch Industrial Estate
Gorseinon
Swansea, UK SA4 9WN
Phone: 011-44-1792-229-333
Web site: www.bbihealthcare.com[2]
Distributor of the SensoCard Plus, which is not yet available in the United States.

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CAPTEK/SCIENCE PRODUCTS
PO Box 888
Southeastern, PA 19399
Phone: (800) 888-7400
Web site: www.captek.net[3]
Produces the Digi-Voice, a voice attachment for the OneTouch Basic blood glucose meter (as well as the discontinued OneTouch Profile and OneTouch SureStep meters), the Sure-Drop, a device that fits over the OneTouch Basic to collect and guide blood to the appropriate spot on the strip, and the Sure Guide, which directs the finger to the appropriate spot on the OneTouch SureStep strip. This company also distributes magnifiers and other talking equipment such as scales and coin counters.

DIAGNOSTIC DEVICES, INC.
9300 Harris Corners Parkway, Suite 450
Charlotte, NC 28269
Phone: (800) 366-5901
Web site: www.prodigymeter.com[4]
Manufactures a line of talking blood glucose meters, including the Prodigy Audio Meter, the Prodigy Duo (which combines a blood glucose meter and blood pressure monitor), the Prodigy Autocode (which features an automatic strip coding function), and the Prodigy Voice (which is completely audible).

LS&S
P.O. Box 673
Northbrook, IL 60065
Phone: (800) 468-4789
Web site: www.lssproducts.com[5]
Sells a wide variety of items for people with visual impairment, including Prodigy meters and the OneTouch Basic meter with a speech box attachment.

PHARMA SUPPLY
3381 Fairlane Farms Road
West Palm Beach, FL 33414
Phone: (866) 373-2824
Web site: www.pharmasupply.com[6]
Carries the Advocate line of talking blood glucose meters, which includes the Advocate, Advocate Duo (a combination talking blood glucose meter and blood pressure monitor), and Advocate Redi-Code (which features an automatic strip coding function), as well as a variety of general diabetes supplies.

Endnotes:
  1. www.accu-chek.com/us: http://www.accu-chek.com/us
  2. www.bbihealthcare.com: http://www.bbihealthcare.com
  3. www.captek.net: http://www.captek.net
  4. www.prodigymeter.com: http://www.prodigymeter.com
  5. www.lssproducts.com: http://www.lssproducts.com
  6. www.pharmasupply.com: http://www.pharmasupply.com

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/diabetes-resources/tools-tech/talking-meters/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

July 21, 2006 12:00 am

The books and other resources listed here can help you learn how to look out for yourself and get the help you need when you need it.

BE PREPARED
The Complete Financial, Legal, and Practical Guide for Living with a Life-Challenging Condition
David S. Landay
St. Martin’s Press
New York, 1998

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LIVING A HEALTHY LIFE WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS
Self-Management of Heart Disease, Arthritis, Diabetes, Asthma, Bronchitis, Emphysema and Others
Kate Lorig, Halsted Holman, et al.
Bull Publishing
Boulder, Colorado, 2000

AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION
(800) DIABETES (342-2383)
www.diabetes.org[1]

BENEFITSCHECKUP
www.benefitscheckup.org[2]
This Web site from the National Council on the Aging provides information on benefits available in all 50 states.

CENTERS FOR MEDICARE AND MEDICAID SERVICES
http://cms.hhs.gov[3]
(877) 267-2323
(410) 786-3000
TTY: (866) 226-1819
TTY: (410) 786-0727

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
(800) 772-1213
TTY: (800) 325-0778
www.ssa.gov[4]
Have your Social Security number at hand when you call.

Endnotes:
  1. www.diabetes.org: http://www.diabetes.org
  2. www.benefitscheckup.org: http://www.benefitscheckup.org
  3. http://cms.hhs.gov: http://cms.hhs.gov
  4. www.ssa.gov: http://www.ssa.gov

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/diabetes-resources/money-matters/getting-a-hand-from-social-agencies/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

Resources

January 30, 2006 12:00 am

The following organizations can be a good place to start if you’d like information on low-vision and blindness rehabilitation or services.

American Association of Diabetes Educators
(800) 338-3633
www.diabeteseducator.org
Contact the AADE to locate a member of the Disabilities/Visual Impairment Specialty Practice Group. The Web site has a “Find An Educator” feature, which locates diabetes educators by name or area.

American Council of the Blind
(800) 424-8666
(202) 467-5081
www.acb.org
Grants scholarship assistance to blind and visually impaired post-secondary students. Also has a toll-free hotline that provides information and referrals. Produces a free monthly magazine, “The Braille Forum,” available on the Web site or via e-mail, as well as in Braille, large print, audiocassette formats.

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American Foundation for the Blind
(800) AFB-LINE (232-5463)
www.afb.org
Publishes evaluations of assistive devices in the bimonthly periodical AccessWorld, located online at www.afb.org/aw. Produces a range of materials with information for the visually impaired and their families. Maintains a list of organizations throughout the United States and Canada that provide assistance to the blind and visually impaired.

Department of Veterans Affairs
(800) 827-1000
www1.va.gov/blindrehab
Provides blindness rehabilitation services to veterans and their dependents, including orientation and mobility training, instruction in communication skills, and group meetings with other visually impaired people.

National Eye Institute
(301) 496-5248
www.nei.nih.gov
This Web site, which is produced in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health, includes a patient information library, photos and illustrations, low-vision information, news and events, clinical studies, and current research. Information is also available in Spanish. The National Eye Health Education Program has a Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program. See www.nei.nih.gov/nehep/ded.asp for program materials or call the National Eye Institute for more information on eye diseases.

National Federation of the Blind
(410) 659-9314
www.nfb.org
Provides a list of diabetes resources for people with impaired vision. Information is available for free at www.nfb.org/nfb/Diabetics.asp or by contacting the organization.

National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
(888) NLS-READ (657-7323)
www.loc.gov/nls
The Talking Book Program is a free service for people who are visually impaired or who have a disability that prevents the use of printed materials. The service provides texts in Braille and audio formats, plus the equipment to play the audio recordings, via postage-free mail. Visit www.loc.gov/nls/find.html to locate a library in your area.

Voice of the Diabetic
(573) 875-8911
https://nfb.org/voice-diabetic
A free quarterly newsletter about diabetes geared toward people who are blind or visually impaired. Available in print, audiocassette, e-mail, and on the Web site.

Source URL: http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/managing-diabetes/complications-prevention/resources/


Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.