Diabetes Self-Management Blog

I.

Why did it not surprise me? I have a tender spot on the back of my left leg from sitting and from transferring from my mobility scooter to bed, chairs, cars, and whatever else.

I discussed an idea with my primary-care physician when I saw him last week. After checking the spot out, he agreed that a consult with a wound care center about how to stop it from becoming an ulcer (open wound) was in order.

Not according to the wound care center, which is affiliated with one of the hospitals in town. (The other wound care center is affiliated with the other hospital in town.)

“Not unless you have an open wound,” the no-nonsense-sounding nurse said, with the “period” implied, but not spoken. “If you make an appointment and you come in here and don’t have an open wound, you’ll turn around and go right back home.”

I’ve written about this before, in a blog entry that explores the differences between the cost of complications and the cost of prevention. And that’s just the monetary cost: not the physical or psychological costs.

On the other hand, it did say it’s a wound CARE center; not a wound PREVENTION center.

II.

I’m chained (so to speak) to the computer at the moment. My scooter is plugged into a charger and my insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM) are plugged into USB ports on the computer as they suck up some juice of their own.

It reminds me of the days on insulin-pumpers.org. “We are Borg,” we’d say with pride about being part of the collective.

Borg is a fictional alien race that appears now and again in Star Trek movies and television shows. The collective picks from here and there and turns its victims into cyber-humans.

Their goal? To “achieve perfection.”

I’d never thought of the Borg as analogy for “achieving perfection” in diabetes before. My champion more resembled Alice in Wonderland, who ate this and drank that to achieve her own perfection — that of maintaining the proper height.

In fact, I have a small Alice collection consisting primarily of tea sets.

Back to the Borg: It stands to reason that, as diabetes equipment gets more sophisticated, it’s making us more and more a part of the Borg. My insulin pump has a touch screen. My CGM gives me my blood glucose number every five minutes with just the touch of a button. An artificial pancreas is in studies.

Perhaps we’re not achieving perfection now — perhaps we never will — but we’re getting a lot closer than we were in the dark ages (not so long ago) of no meters, a very short list of oral medications and insulin, no nutrition labels to help us keep up with carb consumption, and more.

We may as well just go with the flow. After all…resistance is futile.

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Living With Diabetes
Information at Our Fingertips (09/04/14)
The Outside Like the Inside (08/27/14)
Upcoming "Taking Charge of Your Diabetes" Health Fairs (08/19/14)
Patterned Behaviors (08/14/14)

 

 

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