Diabetes Self-Management Blog

Whew! I’m breathing so much easier! Which, in turn, gives me a bit more energy than I’ve had in ages. It’s kind of like before and after beginning to use insulin.

As I told you in my blog entry last week (“What’s Up, Doc…Doc…Doc…Doc…?”), my family practice doctor sent me to a cardiologist, who found reduced blood flow in a small portion of my heart. He prescribed a drug that dilates blood vessels, which I began taking toward the end of last week. (Just as good, it’s available as a generic.)

Wow! What a difference! I could now walk around with no problems if it weren’t for the snow.

To clarify: I don’t mean walking through the snow. The snow is outside and I am not. I do like snow, but prefer to enjoy it by looking out the window. (On the other hand, I do live in an older house and the windows definitely need to be reglazed — or replaced. I’m surprised I don’t find a little snowdrift in the corner of this room that’s between two windows.)

As I’ve aged, however, my body seems to have morphed into a barometer. It does not like changes in the weather and it most emphatically does not like snow. I knew a couple of nights ago — when I got up to go to the bathroom and had to hold on to everything I could find to creak my way through the bedroom — that something was coming. And I hadn’t even seen or heard a weather forecast.

So the breathing was better, but the arthritic knees were worse. At least the breathing and the knees weren’t both rotten. I’ll take any little advance I can get.

I’ve been thinking lately that we need to get back to doing things to the house. We did when we first moved in, but eventually reached a point where we needed to take a break. Now that we’re nearing retirement age, it seems prudent to start back in, doing a little bit here and a little bit there, from new flooring for the bathrooms and some repainting to a new roof.

But it’s probably even more important to do more to fix up the structure that houses my soul: my body.

It used to be a good body. It was a body that turned cartwheels, ran up and down steps, was in a marching band (flute) for eight years, and danced into the early hours of morning. Not so many years ago, it could even climb the hills of San Francisco and accompany children around Disney World and Disneyland for hours on end.

Where did the time go? How could I have let myself get into a situation where I need pills to breathe and can barely get through my own house?

Losing weight would be a good start. Not so long ago, I vowed not to book another cruise until I’d lost at least 50 pounds. I lost 17. I got myself a bracelet as a reward for losing 10 pounds. I bought a book to reward myself at the 20-pound mark. The book is still unopened. And I’ve kept my promise and not booked a cruise.

Now, however, I’ve gained back some (OK, most) of what I lost and I really need to get back on track. I need to clear my husband’s stuff off the stationary bike. I need to actually unwrap the armchair exercise DVD I bought, put it in the player and follow along. I need to convince my husband he absolutely cannot bring any of my “trigger” foods into the house (chips, potatoes, etc.). I need to tell my grandchildren I cannot have pizza in my house!

And when I get down to 20 pounds lighter than where I started back whenever it was, I’ll have a good book to read. (Now, where did I put that sucker…?)

POST A COMMENT       
  

Comments
  1. Dear Jan.

    What we really need is an appetite suppressing pill. Anybody, anywhere, any thoughts?

    Were the pills: nitro?

    I was actually walking in snow with the dog a real killer much harder than on bare pavement.

    Get new windows as a reno they will save some energy. Get triple glazed if you live somewhere cold. Otherwise you will have a lot of condensation on the new ones when it is very cold outside. This you dont have on the old ones because they leak like a sive.

    Posted by CalgaryDiabetic |

Post a Comment

Note: All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to your sources. All commenters are considered to be nonmedical professionals unless explicitly stated otherwise. Promotion of your own or someone else's business or competing site is not allowed: Sharing links to sites that are relevant to the topic at hand is permitted, but advertising is not. Once submitted, comments cannot be modified or deleted by their authors. Comments that don't follow the guidelines above may be deleted without warning. Such actions are at the sole discretion of DiabetesSelfManagement.com. Comments are moderated Monday through Friday by the editors of DiabetesSelfManagement.com. The moderators are employees of R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc., and do not report any conflicts of interest. A privacy policy setting forth our policies regarding the collection, use, and disclosure of certain information relating to you and your use of this Web site can be found here. For more information, please read our Terms and Conditions.


Weight Loss
Overweight People With Type 2 May Benefit From Gastric Banding (04/11/14)
FDA Panel Votes in Favor of Inhalable Insulin; Diet Drug Recalled (04/09/14)
Unconventional Ways to Lose Weight…Maybe (03/17/14)
Why Are Animals Getting Fat? (01/28/14)

General Diabetes & Health Issues
Will Spring Ever Arrive? (04/08/14)
"We'll All Get Old If We Live Long Enough" (04/02/14)
What Is Your Urine Trying to Tell You? (03/28/14)
No, This Is Not What "Spring Forward" Means (03/18/14)

 

 

Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor.


Carbohydrate Restriction: An Option for Diabetes Management
Some people find that decreasing the amount of carbohydrate they eat can help with blood glucose control. Here’s what to know about this approach.

Insulin Patch Pumps: A New Tool for Type 2
Patch pumps are simpler to operate than traditional insulin pumps and may be a good option for some people with Type 2 diabetes who need insulin.

How Much Do You Know About Vitamins?
Learn what these micronutrients can and can’t do for you.

Complete table of contents
Get a FREE ISSUE
Subscription questions