Diabetes Self-Management Blog

Searching my brain (or what’s left of it) this week, I couldn’t come up with one thing to write about. I could, however, think of several — none of which would make a full blog. Or not that I could determine. So consider this my occasional burst of cleaning out some of the things I have hiding in folders… and in the recesses of my brain.

***

I sometimes joke that I have a doctor for every part of my body. You may, too. Think about it: When you have diabetes, you need to be proactive in your care to make sure all of those body parts prone to diabetes complications are in good health. Or that complications are caught in the beginning and halted or slowed down.

Therefore, the ophthalmologist checks for retinopathy. The podiatrist makes sure your feet are healthy and free of injury. If your kidneys are spilling protein, a nephrologist works with you to slow down the deterioration. You may have a cardiologist for your heart, a neurologist for nerve damage and a rehab doc to get you going after an injury.

Well, I’ve now gone beyond my body: Today, I will see an infectious disease doc to get rid of that blasted MRSA (which, hopefully, hasn’t spread to a bone or anything).

Yep. I now have a doc for my bacteria.

***

Many years ago, I went to a party. While there, I borrowed a book from the host. When I returned it, he cooked dinner for me. It was the beginning of a long-lasting love affair. Actually, more than an affair: We’ll be married 34 years in August.

I got lucky, and I’m especially realizing that now. Each morning, he gets up a bit early so he can prepare lunch and snacks to leave with me while he’s at work. When he gets home, he prepares dinner (although I’ve been doing more of that lately). There are the dressing changes, the visits to the doctors, the special treats, and more.

Looking back, it was always so. For example, when I began taking insulin and it finally hit me that I really had diabetes, I was afraid he would leave me. In my defense, it was in the beginning of adjusting insulin and matching doses to carbohydrate. I was stressed and not in the best of moods, but he hung in — even adjusting his meal times to mine.

Anyway, if you have somebody like that in your life, don’t forget to say “thanks.” And make that person his or her favorite meal or something.

***

I’m curious. If you have Type 2 diabetes, what has your experience been with health-care folks? At diagnosis, did you come away knowing that Type 2 is serious, or was it waved off? Do you feel that you were made to believe having diabetes was your fault? Were you referred to educators to help you with self-management and meal planning? Did those educators tend to tell you what to do, or did they work with you to help you fit your lifestyle into your diabetes care? Were you told to check your blood glucose? How often?

Stuff like that. And yes, I ask a lot of questions. I was fortunate enough to get very good care… er, when I finally got to a good place nine years after diagnosis. (I guess I’ve had it both ways!)

***

And that’s about all that fell out of my brain during my occasional dusting. I think. I may have had something else in mind, but woke up hypoglycemic and drenched in sweat this morning. Again. I can’t wait to see my endocrinologist next week!

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Comments
  1. Hi,

    I am 43 years old male from India. At present I am living in Dubai since January 2009. My weight shot up from 90 to 97 kilos (my height is 178cms) in just two months after coming to Dubai. May be I am eating more I do not know.

    A few days before I bit the edge of my nail a bit too much (I have this habit)and it resulted in puss formation around the nail. I went for check up and the doctor told me that this is a classic symptom of diabetes. I have family history of diabetes. Now it is not proven.

    I will get tested in a day or two to confirm whether I have diabetes or not. In case if I have diabetes how should I manage the same?? Please help me.

    Posted by mohan sequeira |
  2. I can totally identify what Jan Chait says.
    I was diagnozed on the 23rd of December in 2005, the doc gave me a diet to follow that I later found out was not even a diabetic diet, it was a weight loss diet. My legs had swollen to twice their normal size- I was covered in a rash, and my bllod sugar was in the 300’s. The doc put me on metformin and from that point on I felt I was in some sort of hell. I was om the middle of congestive heart failure, so metformin was not a good choice of drugs for me- I am now on a cocktail of glypzide and januvia.

    On the 19th of January 2006 I had open heart and a quad bi pass- since then I have thank god met with people who have been good to me. I am now watched so carfully, but I have had both carotids done and now have a very serious retnopothy issue, and go to the retina specialist every couple of weeks for laser.

    Diabetes is a killer, it took me a good year to finally meet up with someone who could really explain it to me, and yet I still got retnopothy- blood sugar control is the key-

    Posted by marcy |
  3. Jan,
    I was wondering if your adult camp for diabetics was still in existence? I have not seen anything on it since 2006… Do you guys still meet? If not, would there anyone else that would like to join to get one started. I am a Type 1 Diabetic and have been for 22 years. My family is mostly filled with Diabetics from Type 1 to Type 2 and even though I feel at “home” there with them, there is not many other places where I connect with others.

    I have a 2 year old daughter whom is very interested in “Mommy’s blood-n-sugar” as she calls it. :-) I live in San Diego, California– yes Sunny San Diego.

    Please tell me someone is interested. I keep seeing posts about people wanting one…

    Crystal Wilson
    crobin007@yahoo.com

    Posted by Crystal |
  4. Sorry, no camp this year. Some of us have gotten knocked around by the economy and we need to let things settle down some. Maybe next year.

    Jan

    Posted by Jan Chait |

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