Diabetes Self-Management Blog

On March 25, 2013, LifeScan, Inc., voluntarily issued a recall of all OneTouch VerioIQ blood glucose meters in the United States because the meter malfunctions at extremely high blood glucose levels.

At blood glucose levels of 1024 mg/dl or above, the meter will not provide a warning and will shut off, potentially delaying proper treatment. According to a press release from LifeScan, the likelihood of experiencing such a high blood glucose level is remote, but possible. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not received any reports of adverse events related to this issue.

Those who are using the OneTouch VerioIQ are advised to contact LifeScan customer service at (800) 717-0276 to arrange for a free replacement meter. (Representatives are available daily from 8 AM to 10 PM EDT.) Customers can continue to use their OneTouch VerioIQ until the replacement meter arrives, but they should immediately contact a health-care professional if the meter unexpectedly turns itself off. LifeScan is in the process of implementing an update to the meter to address the issue but has not decided on a timeline for resuming shipments.The OneTouch Ultra meters, OneTouch Select meters, and OneTouch Verio test strips are not affected by the recall and can continue to be used.

Outside the United States, three OneTouch Verio brand meters are being recalled due to incorrect glucose value display or record storage at extremely high glucose levels. The affected meters include the OneTouch VerioIQ, the OneTouch Verio Pro, and the OneTouch Verio Pro+.

LifeScan has notified the FDA and health-care authorities around the world of the voluntary recall.

For additional information, visit the OneTouch Web site.

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Comments
  1. You people got to be crazy. Malfuntion at 1024? I don’t think the meter is going to be a problem!!!

    Posted by Gerald Bryant |
  2. I have never seen a reading above 560. I am told one with anything higher would result in coma almost right away. I do commend One Touch for doing this all and voluntarily. I have very much enjoyed the One Touch products and use them to this day. They are a great company.

    Carl L

    Posted by Carl L |
  3. Wouldn’t someone be dead or in a coma long before such a high reading, and it would be impossible for that person to check their blood glucose?

    Posted by Jan P |
  4. GB is correct. If your BG is at 1024 then you have a much larger problem than your meter shutting off. BTW, a reading of 1024 doesn’t just happen overnight.

    I love my Verio IQ.

    Posted by WeAre TheFoods |
  5. Really? over 1000? And I would be doing what? Ignoring it?

    Posted by Gillie Waddington |
  6. When I first found out i had diabetes my reading was 749.I was fine and alert.I know God was keeping me safe though!

    Posted by Joey |
  7. I had a reading above that because I was undiagnosed at the time. After being admitted to the hospital, the admitting physician had never treated someone above 600. God was with me.

    Posted by Lorraine P |
  8. I have developed a procedure to control my Diabetes and thus have maintaned it well within the required level as specified by the Doc. I can not understand how anyone could handle that level !

    Posted by Mitch Mans |
  9. Anyone who experiences a blood glucose level
    exceeding 1024 is near death. Their problem
    is not the meter!

    Posted by Richard Kidd |
  10. Had to read about this, glad I did. I’ve used the OneTouch UltraSmart for several years now, and it works like a charm. In fact, I refused to change brands when my testing provider tried to (sort of) make me.

    Whoa! I thought 350 was a high reading, sure does feel bad even there….so heaven help anyone with a reading over 1000!

    Posted by Barbara Hogan |
  11. After reading past coments I concur that if I had reading that high, my last rites would be next step. My gloclouse level is controlled by byetta and proper food portion. My glucometer is a accu-check recomended by my endocologist at the time.Philip

    Posted by Philip |
  12. At 35yrs old I went into convulsions and had my 5 year old son dial 911. I am told I had been in a diabetic coma with over 950/1000 bg. When I woke up, a doctor was telling me he was giving me a shot of insulin, which I would take for the rest of my life. I spent a week in the hospital and was still not “with it” when I left.

    Before this happened, I was going to doctor after doctor telling them how sick I felt all the time. Yet I was being diagnosed as depressed (all I could do was cry), and drink can after can after can of any soda/liquid (nonalcoholic)…I was so sick in so many ways (physical), and none of it had to do with mental illness.

    Do not be so judgmental! If any ONE of those “doctors” had put together my thirst and a few other symptoms I continued to tell them, they should have immediately thought DIABETES.

    Posted by Yvonne R |
  13. WHAT? I didn’t even know that a person could have a reading that high and still be alive! Is this possible?

    Posted by Pat Buongiorne |
  14. No wonder the machine shuts off at 1000,the patient is already seeing angels and hearing harps

    Posted by Glory |
  15. I can’t imagine EVER having a result of 1024. I would hope the monitor wouldn’t even register that high. One needs a doctor if you’re EVER nearing quadruple digits.

    I don’t like being over 200 and, through 43 years of injections, I haven’t ever experienced a high like that. I don’t understand how anyone could survive that…

    Posted by Debbie Santelli |
  16. Had a diabetic friend end up in the hospital recently with a BG lab result over 1200. Yes, the friend is still living. Could have suffered a seizure. The blood at this high level would surely be very viscous. Could have experienced a stroke, or death. Was not using insulin properly.
    Very insidious disease. So many complications when blood glucose levels are not kept near normal range.

    My meter is the One Touch Ultra Link. I have used it for over two years, and it communicates with muy insulin pump. No problems with the meter.

    Posted by Donna R West |
  17. I have had my blood sugar recorded at 1600. I was in a coma, but only for an hour or so. The first lab I remember from that hospital my blood sugar was 1450. It was a bad experience I wouldn’t wish on anyone.

    Posted by Jennifer |
  18. To get a BG of 1024 don’t you have to be on an IV drip of PURE SUGAR?

    Posted by William L. Hans Sr. |
  19. So sorry Yvonne! Yes, one of your doctors should have suspected diabetes previous to your emergency. I have learned the feeling of high blood sugar when I get very hot, sweaty, and short of breath. And mine is usually only 250-300. I thought that was very high. You were very lucky to have gotten to the hospital. I hope you have good doctors now that help you keep your readings under control. God bless!

    Posted by Linda M. |
  20. When I was diagnosed in 2003 the lab phone me at 10pm and said I need to get to the ER as my blood sugar reading was 755. It was the worst feeling I ever felt. Spent 2 weeks in the hospital before they were able to get it down.

    I would like some one to explain to me how manufactures can charge $1.00 plus on a piece of plastic which is vital for someone with a life threatening disease.

    Posted by BM |
  21. I’ve emailed LifeScan and they provided a specific number to call immediately for advice. They were strongly concerned about the situation & my own case too! They processed an order for replacement meter right away. I encourage anyone in doubt to call LifeScan immediately; they’re Courteous ‘n Kind people. Blessings for you all; and Take care! (P/Me for any typing error)

    Posted by Manny C. |
  22. I have had a level of over 1000 before. I hadn’t had diabetes that long and was not properly educated. It took a bit for it to get to that level but I did not know what was wrong with me. I was urinating very often and drinking a lot of fluids. my vision was deteriorating. Everything became a total blur at last. It is important to be educated. I received much education from of which directed me to the importance of testing and eating as well as much more. Be cautious, learn the symptoms. Eat properly.

    Posted by Robert C |
  23. To those saying a 1000 reading is impossible: when my son was diagnosed with type 1 at age 10, his bg was 1100. He was still going to school, walking around, and joking with the pediatrician.

    Posted by MaryD |
  24. A postscript to my comment above on bgs over 1000: if you use an insulin pump and it malfunctions, your bg can go up extremely fast because you use only short-acting insulin in the pump.

    Posted by MaryD |
  25. You commenters must all be type 2s.

    Posted by MaryD |
  26. MaryD:

    I am a type 2 and would not presume to counter your comments. My liver was reliably shooting the blood glucose up to max on a caveman machine on a liver dump as liver threw the whole liver buffer at the problem.

    The knowlegde on how the body actually works and how things are added to the blood system are grotesquetly inadgequate and stupid. Not all glucose feeds to blood system are orderly and evenly mixed across time. Liver throws it in full strength and lets heart pumping average the stuff out. The blood system is an open highway for things to be dumped on/off and there is no stoichimetric mixing. Human blood system works like ethernet and NOT token ring with fixed size small packets carefully loaded on to even out the load.

    Posted by jim snell |
  27. I can’t even emagine all that I am reading. I am a diabetic type 2 and I do find it very hard to keep it under control. Howwever I have no way ever have had a reading of over 350 and that is because I didn’t check my bg before I had something to eat so I had to do a correction which I do very often. Is it right? NO, but at least I do take my insulin and bring it down. I am 74 years old and somewhat active. I live alone and take care of my house and do my own shopping and yes still drive. I am not a 25mph driver Iget upset at some people who don’t know where their gas petal is. They go 30 mph in a 50mph zone and wonder why they get into an accident. God bless all of you.

    Posted by Annette B |
  28. Had to call Lifescan to tell ‘em about recent bad experience with the recalled meter and they offered to send a replacement VerioIQ Kit but I was provided another meter which is not compatible with Software/Records I kept so far. I’ve tried to contact Lifescan again unsuccessfully. Hope they will call back soon.

    Posted by Manuel C. |
  29. How about Pineapple juice to treat thirst syntoms?
    Apparently the RECORD HIGH BG reported in the medical literature is above 5,600 mg/dL !
    The previous record (!) reported in medical journals in 1966 was over 4700 mg/dL

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/13/2/181.full.pdf+html?sid=d6bc30ec-5aa8-4f42-87ba-297b59208f2d

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5924840
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2190771

    http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/110/9887/record-high-blood

    Record high blood glucose
    By Dr. Bill Quick, Health ProMonday, May 28, 2007
    I recently was asked if a blood glucose level of 1300 mg/dl was possible.

    Yes, it is! In fact, it’s nowhere near the record; there’s a Letter to the Editor of Diabetes Care in the February, 1990 issue (1) that seems to set the record:
    5600 mg/dl (311.3 mmol/L)
    The authors describe a 29 year old man, who did not have a diagnosis of diabetes, and who had been previously healthy. The day before admission to the hospital, he was thirsty (attributed to hot weather) and drank 12 liters of Coca-Cola, six cans of pineapple juice with sugar, several liters of orange juice, and sugared water.

    On the day of admission, he was found unconscious in his apartment. “Paramedics infused 50 ml of 50% dextrose” (apparently concerned that he might have hypoglycemia). At the Emergency Room, he was “deeply comatose” and severely dehydrated. After lab tests were drawn, he got another 50 ml of 50% dextrose! After getting back the lab results, he was started on more appropriate therapy (insulin and fluids), and gradually improved, and was discharged with “no neurologic deficits.”

    The authors comment that “given the ease and rapidity of glucose estimation by reagent strips, the practice of indiscriminate administration of dextrose to comatose patients should, in our opinion, be discouraged.” I agree.

    (1) A Soni, SV Rao, R Bajaj, and G Treser
    Extreme hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity
    Diabetes Care 13: 181-182.

    REFERENCES
    . Knowles HC Jr: Syrupy blood (Editorial). Diabetes 15:760-761, 1966

    Posted by T1D |
  30. How about Pineapple juice to treat thirst syntoms?
    Apparently the RECORD HIGH BG reported in the medical literature is above 5,600 mg/dL !
    (THAT’S NOT A TYPO)
    The previous record (!) reported in medical journals in 1966 was over 4,700 mg/dL

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/13/2/181.full.pdf+html?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5924840
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2190771

    http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/110/9887/record-high-blood

    Record high blood glucose
    By Dr. Bill Quick, Health ProMonday, May 28, 2007
    I recently was asked if a blood glucose level of 1300 mg/dl was possible.

    Yes, it is! In fact, it’s nowhere near the record; there’s a Letter to the Editor of Diabetes Care in the February, 1990 issue (1) that seems to set the record:
    5600 mg/dl (311.3 mmol/L)
    The authors describe a 29 year old man, who did not have a diagnosis of diabetes, and who had been previously healthy. The day before admission to the hospital, he was thirsty (attributed to hot weather) and drank 12 liters of Coca-Cola, six cans of pineapple juice with sugar, several liters of orange juice, and sugared water.

    On the day of admission, he was found unconscious in his apartment. “Paramedics infused 50 ml of 50% dextrose” (apparently concerned that he might have hypoglycemia). At the Emergency Room, he was “deeply comatose” and severely dehydrated. After lab tests were drawn, he got another 50 ml of 50% dextrose! After getting back the lab results, he was started on more appropriate therapy (insulin and fluids), and gradually improved, and was discharged with “no neurologic deficits.”

    The authors comment that “given the ease and rapidity of glucose estimation by reagent strips, the practice of indiscriminate administration of dextrose to comatose patients should, in our opinion, be discouraged.” I agree.

    (1) A Soni, SV Rao, R Bajaj, and G Treser
    Extreme hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity
    Diabetes Care 13: 181-182.

    REFERENCES in (1)
    . Knowles HC Jr: Syrupy blood (Editorial). Diabetes 15:760-761, 1966

    Posted by T1D |

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