Diabetes Self-Management Blog

This week wraps up our look at protein supplements. As we’ve seen, whey and casein supplements are the top contenders out there. Soy protein supplements are another option, especially for those who prefer something that’s plant-based. There’s one other plant-based protein supplement that isn’t as widely known as the others, and that’s hemp.

What Is Hemp?
Hemp is a crop that is thousands of years old. The stalk of the plant is extremely strong, making it suitable for use in rope, fabric, and paper. Hemp oil has been used for food, for lamp oil, and to make soap and paint.

Hemp is part of the cannabis species but does not contain psychoactive compounds (as are found in marijuana); this species is grown specifically for food, personal care products, textiles, and building materials.

Hemp Nutrition
Hemp seeds and hemp oil are obviously plant products, making them suitable for vegetarians. Hemp is also gluten-free, and allergies to hemp are not common. Hemp oil contains a fatty acid called gamma linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid that may help ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy, improve blood glucose control, and possibly help ease the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Hemp seeds are low in carbohydrate and rich in protein and fat. Like flax seeds, they can be added to just about anything, such as salads, cereal, soup, or yogurt. One tablespoon of hemp seeds contains 80 calories, 5 grams of fat, 3.5 grams of carbohydrate, and 5.5 grams of protein.

Hemp oil is a polyunsaturated fat that, like flaxseed oil, has a nutty taste and can be used in and on foods. It’s not meant to be used as a cooking oil, however. One tablespoon of hemp oil has 126 calories, 14 grams of fat, and only 1.5 grams of saturated fat.

Hemp Protein
Like soybeans, hemp protein is considered to be a plant source of high-quality (or complete) protein, containing 10 essential amino acids. Some people may find hemp protein to be more easily digested than soy, thanks to a type of protein called edestin. People who are vegetarians or who may be allergic or intolerant to soy, tree nuts, or dairy might decide to use hemp protein. A 30-gram serving of hemp protein powder (which is about 4 tablespoons) provides 11 grams of protein and 6 grams of fiber. Hemp protein powder also contains vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, and iron.

A drawback to hemp protein is that it contains less protein than other protein supplements, such as whey. Bodybuilders may find that hemp protein powder doesn’t contain enough protein to actually build muscle. However, as a general protein supplement, hemp protein is certainly an option.

Side Effects of Hemp Protein
Hemp protein is highly nutritious and has relatively few side effects. However, it may initially cause gastrointestinal distress, such as cramping, bloating, or diarrhea, in some people. This is generally temporary. People taking blood-thinning medicines should be careful about hemp protein, as it may increase the risk of bleeding.

Summing It Up
The decision to use a protein supplement is (ideally) one to make with your health-care provider or dietitian. People who are in relatively good health don’t need to take in additional protein. But in the event that you or your provider believes that your diet isn’t giving you the amount of protein that you need, consider taking a protein supplement.

Protein powders, in general, provide at least 20 grams of protein per 3 tablespoon serving (usually a standard serving size), as well as 100 to 130 calories. You likely don’t need more than one serving of the protein supplement during the day as long as you are eating other sources of protein in your diet. The carbohydrate content of protein powders can vary, so check the label and don’t forget to count it if it’s more than 5 grams per serving. Also, consider what you’re mixing your protein powder with. If you mix your powder with skim milk or juice, don’t forget to figure in the carbohydrate and calories, as well.

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Nutrition & Meal Planning
Eating to Lower Insulin Needs (12/09/14)
Sugar-Free Labels Can Be Deceptive (12/02/14)
My Battle With the Glycemic Index (11/25/14)
A Short Fast for the Holidays (11/18/14)

 

 

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