Diabetes Self-Management Articles

These articles cover a wide range of subjects, from the most basic aspects of diabetes care to the nitty-gritty specifics.

Links not loading properly?

Some of our pages use Portable Document Format (PDF) files, which require Adobe Acrobat Reader. To download Acrobat Reader for free, visit www.adobe.com.

Sign up for our weekly e-mail newsletter and receive a FREE GIFT! Enter your e-mail below.

Learn more

Learn more about diabetes

Links to help you learn more about diabetes.

Ask a diabetes expert
Other diabetes resources
Browse article topics

 

Fibrinogen

A protein produced by the liver that plays an important role in the development of blood clots. High levels of fibrinogen in the blood, which are associated with advancing age, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes, and smoking, appear to raise the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Scientists aren’t certain whether high fibrinogen levels (called hyperfibrinogenemia) are a cause or simply a marker of cardiovascular disease. It’s possible that hyperfibrinogenemia is simply a result of the chronic inflammation that characterizes atherosclerosis, or the buildup of fatty plaques on blood vessel walls that leads to cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, hyperfibrinogenemia may actively increase blood thickness, affect interactions between blood platelets, or trigger other mechanisms that directly promote the formation of atherosclerotic plaques on blood vessel walls.

Doctors measure blood levels of fibrinogen when they suspect blood clotting abnormalities or an inherited fibrinogen abnormality, or, in some cases, to help evaluate a person’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The normal range of fibrinogen in the blood is 200-400 mg/dl.

A number of lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, becoming more physically active, and improving your cholesterol level (lowering LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol and raising HDL, or “good,” cholesterol), may help to lower your fibrinogen level. Even if they don’t, they are of proven benefit in lowering a person’s risk of cardiovascular disease.

 

 

More articles on Diabetes Definitions

 

 


Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information.

 

 

Diabetes Transition Experiences Study
Do you have diabetes and experience transitioning from a pediatric to an ... Blog

Color Me Healthy
When was the last time you gave some thought to color? Maybe it was when yo... Blog

Students With Diabetes Now Accepting 2015 Internship Applications
Are you a college or graduate school student with Type 1 diabetes who's i... Blog

When is the best time to add seasonings to a recipe? Get tip


Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring — Part 3: Smart Monitoring

10 Keys to Long-Term Weight Loss

Take Your Best Shot: Stay Up to Date on Vaccines

Complete table of contents
Get a FREE ISSUE
Subscription questions